molding egg weights - cost effective?

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by team salmon, Apr 29, 2009.

  1. team salmon

    team salmon New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    kansas
    I USE ALOT OF EGG WEIGHTS FROM 1OZ TO AROUND 4OZ - WILL BUYING A MOLD AND DOING MY OWN SAVE ENOUGH TO MAKE IT WORTH THE TIME - ALSO WHERE'S A GOOD PLACE TO PURCHASE A MOLD - POT - AND BULK LEAD? ANY INFO WOULD BE GREAT- THANKS!!!
     
  2. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    If you use a lot of egg weights it will save you a bunch of money if you make your own. You can get a mold from Barlows or Catfish Conection. They will have lead pots also. Get your lead at a scrap yard or get wheel weights for a tire shop.
    Some one in your area may have a pot that you can use. Alot of the guys get together and have a weight pouring party.
     

  3. BIG_D

    BIG_D New Member

    Messages:
    8,107
    State:
    Batchtown IL.
    if you fish a river and loos lots of waits like i do you better beleave its worth it for me anyway i use 6 and 8oz no roll thay get costly quick egg sinkers are not as bad but still save you in the long run its kinda exspensev to get started making your sinkers but it also makes for a good winter past time
     
  4. Plowboy411

    Plowboy411 New Member

    Messages:
    918
    State:
    Georgia
    if you have the time and the money,
    it will be one of the best things you ever did to save some cash as far as fishing goes.
     
  5. Boomer

    Boomer New Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    State:
    Oklahoma
    The last time I bought lead (got it at a recycling center) I paid 19 cents a pound for it (5 years ago), I make bank sinkers, I made 4 oz ones, and made 4 of those, at Wally World, they wanted 1.49 for 3 of them. So I saved myself 1.30, my mold cost me 42 dollars. That is a savings of 43 cents a sinker. So after 97 sinkers I was actually making money. Let me tell you, over the last 10 years I probably have saved myself 4-500 dollars alone on sinkers. I now have an assortment of sinker molds, from 1/8 oz up to 8 oz molds. I even bought one of those crappie 1/32 molds and 1000 hooks. After 10 years I still have about 500 hooks to make jig heads, and all my family and friends are well stocked.

    My wife had a garage sale one time and I had make some 2-6 oz weights and had them on my table, well needless to say she sold them also, 1 dollar a pound, I made 81 cents a pound on them, the problem was, I make lead weights in 50 lbs increments, that will do me at least a year, so after she sold my weights, I had to go and buy some more lead and remake me some.

    The intial investment you put out will be a good chunk of change, depending on how many molds you buy, the pot, and the other accessories, but over the years the investment pays off big time.
     
  6. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Last time I bought lead, probably from the same recycling center as Boomer (if he bought in OKC) it was seventy-five cents a pound. Still a whole lot cheaper than the egg (or whatever) sinker your gonna buy. But you will need to go several years before you recoup your entire investment. LOL
     
  7. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    I agree with this post. You will also enjoy making weights in the off season. It helps with the cabin fever.:0a27:
     
  8. tiny b

    tiny b Active Member

    Messages:
    847
    State:
    TX
    I pour my own weights and would not have it any other way. Not only is it a cost savings but I enjoy doing it myself. Bought 53 pounds of lead yesterday at 45 cents a pound. Tried my new no-roll mold and they look good!
     
  9. canebreaker

    canebreaker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,307
    State:
    Southaven,MS
    Solid sinkers can be molded from most lead mixters.
    Spilt shot and pinch-ons need to be made from pure lead.
    At first I was melting lead with a torch and pouring it onto
    a steel work bench. Making silver dollar shaped pieces.
    Then pouring the scrap out of ladle. Melt the lead again,
    reduce the chance of pouring trash into molds.

    Do-it molds are the best, a few dollars saved from
    one dealer to another.
     
  10. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Obviously, the more sinkers you use of a particular type & weight, and the greater their cost, the more you'll save by pouring your own. As a very rough rule of thumb, you can figure that you'll save about half the cost of buying them off the shelf. How much it costs to get started depends on how fancy you want to get. The one thing you don't want to do is buy a cheap mold. This is where you get what you pay for. A cheap mold will require lots more cleanup on each sinker; after cleaning up a sinker poured in a really cheap mold, you'll probably feel like you carved it out of a block of solid lead. But you can save on other equipment. While an electric pot may be nice, it's certainly not necessary. I've been pouring my own for over 50 years and never felt the need to buy one. And to me, it's a shame to use a good cast iron pot for melting lead. I use a heavy duty saucepan that holds 15#-20# of lead. You can probably find one in the trash, or at least in a thrift shop. A non-stick type that's been discarded because the non-stick has worn off is just great. For heat, I've used everything from the kitchen stove to an electric hotplate. What I use now is the burner & stand for my turkey cooker; works better than anything else I've used, and I can use it outdoors, which is safer. You'll need something to skim off the slag; take an old junky, large spoon and fasten it to a wooden handle with a couple of screws so that you don't have to touch the metal handle of the spoon. While you can buy an old kitchen ladle, make a ladle by screwing half a can to a wooden handle, buying one made for the purpose is probably worth the money. I use one that has the pouring spout down on the side so that the impurities floating on top are skimmed off and stay in the ladle. But when I started out, I used half a can and held it with a pair of vice-grips.
     
  11. Ghosth

    Ghosth New Member

    Messages:
    241
    State:
    North Dakota
    A lot will depend on what price you can find lead at.
    If your good at scavenging, by all means jump on it.

    Wheel weights work fine if you can find a good source of used ones for reasonable. They will be a bit harder than pure lead.

    Be careful when melting them down, well ventilated area, etc.

    I bought my molds long long ago, and use a simple 8" cast iron fry pan to melt with. With any luck I have enough lead put aside to last me for another 5 - 10 years before I have to buy any.

    And as was said above, its one of those off season things you can do to save yourself money and it can be very enjoyable.

    I'd recommend against melting down car battery's, as there is a lot of work for not much lead. And the fumes can be pretty toxic. Mostly the plates tend to be so oxidized you don't get much out of them. So your down to the posts and connections between cells.