modular home transport

Discussion in 'Other Repairs' started by solomon, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. solomon

    solomon New Member

    Messages:
    735
    State:
    MS
    I found a great deal on a 1350 sq ft double wide. 9 years old imaculate condition. Was thinking of buying it and living in it while I build a house. It has to be moved though. Anyone ever had to move a double wide? What all does that entail? Wondering if it's worth the trouble.
     
  2. solomon

    solomon New Member

    Messages:
    735
    State:
    MS
    if I put this in the wrong place. I'm sorry. I don't see a general discussion area anymore.
     

  3. Chuckb

    Chuckb New Member

    Messages:
    211
    State:
    Pana Illinois
    I have been in the housing industry for over 12 years and spent nearly 9 of them selling double wides. It can get a little complicated depending on what brand, who put it together originally, etc etc. But an average tear down and move and reset now up here is 7K. Shoot me a PM.
     
  4. fwmud

    fwmud New Member

    Messages:
    693
    State:
    Wilson's Mills,nc
    Sol, check your local codes before buying/moving. here there is a "cut-off" on how old a MH that you can relocate and re-set up.
    Might save you alittle trouble.
     
  5. solomon

    solomon New Member

    Messages:
    735
    State:
    MS
    thanks for the replies guys. I should have already mentioned that I decided against the whole ordeal. Not really what we want to do. I think I'm about ready to build a house.
     
  6. Kittyhunter

    Kittyhunter New Member

    Messages:
    291
    State:
    Princeton, NC
    PLEASE, don't take this personally, but I can't beleive they don't require you to follow codes and inspections to build your own house. They just let you do whatever? So, not saying you did or would, what if somebody builds a house and does a crappy job with the foundation. Now it looks good visibly but is not correctly done, now you buy this house thinking you got a great deal and the guy that built is makes a fortune in profit because he cut corners. You live there 3 months and the foundation crumbles, house collapses and you lose everything. Was it worth it? Here in NC, everything has to be inspected and if the inspector lets something slide and it causes a problem, he could be in trouble even years later. Now I agree, some of the costs of permits and stuff are crazy and are a money maker for the county and state, but some kind of rules should have to be followed. Again, I'm not personally attacking you, but that's just crazy.
     
  7. elphaba7

    elphaba7 New Member

    Messages:
    795
    State:
    Mo'town, WV
    everywhere I've lived, has required code inspection and permits. Especially if you are financed through a lending institution...it's really "their" house, until you make that last payment, and they aren't going to invest in anything that will fall down, leak, or shock you everytime you turn on a light switch.

    Best thing to do is talk to whoever you can about help...your cousin's buddy who is a plumber, brother -in-law does masonry, etc...more often than not, you'll be able to save alot on labor that way. Good luck