Missouri River "Weldon Springs Access"

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by Ranger482V, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. Ranger482V

    Ranger482V New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    Missouri
    Guys, you have a pretty nice site here. 95% of my fishing is for bass, but I would like to catch a few catfish every now and then. I've tried several times using shad and stink bait, fishing in the holes behind the wing dams, but have had very little luck. Biggest fish so far is a 5 pound channel cat. This is only one hole that i've found too. My question is: what should I look for structure wise? What size weights do you all use? What's the best bait? Should I be fishing outside channel bends, or inside. I found a hole behind a wing dam with 40 ft. of water, but never got a bite. Broke off twice after I got hung up on something. I really have no idea how to fish for them. I have a 16ft jon boat with a tiller 25 horse merc. Basically, any way that you guys could help a rookie out would be greatly appreciated. GPS coordinates are always welcome! J/K, but seriously! :0a35:
     
  2. noj77

    noj77 Member

    Messages:
    457
    State:
    Saint Peters, M
    Welcome to the BOC. Not that familiar with the Mighty Mo, but keeping digging around this site and you will come upon some info. I am sure someone will add a few tips.
     

  3. Ranger482V

    Ranger482V New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    Missouri
    Anyone else!!!!????
     
  4. Michael Jake

    Michael Jake New Member

    Messages:
    808
    State:
    Troy, Missouri
    Welcome to the BOC Tyler, it’s a great place that provides us with a platform to share and learn more of this great sport of catfishing. There’s a rush right now, folks here are trying to get as much time on the water as possible because the spawn can begin anytime. During this slow fishing period is a good time to learn the waters as well as research the library here. Catfish relate to some form of structure, currant and food supply. We try to share what bait, cut and size is best at the moment to help others as that changes with the seasons. Catfishing is a driving passion and with time will pay off. Hang in there, keep informed enjoy the waters out there.
     
  5. Ranger482V

    Ranger482V New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks Michael, I'm trying to learn all I can! I've just never really gotten into catfishing. If you guys ever need some info on bass I can help you guys out. :wink:
     
  6. stlcatman

    stlcatman New Member

    Messages:
    2,408
    State:
    Imperial, MO
    Welcome to the BOC Tyler. It looks like you are well on your way from your post. It sounds like you have spent a great deal of time learning how to catch bait (that is step one):smile2: J/K Seriously though bait is very important when looking for the big cats. Fresh shad, mooneye, skipjack, asian carp to name a few. These fish are very selective at times and will only take certain offerings at any given time. Try a different cut on each rod. Try the head, gut pocket, and fillets. When you find what they like switch to that cut. The amount of weight you use is based upon the amount of current in the spot that you are fishing. 8 oz is a good base for what we use on the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers. Blues like current and will usually be found laying in spots in the current behind a current break. The structure that you are looking for can be anything from rocks on the bottom, brush piles, humps or a washboard type bottom. These areas have pockets of water that the fish can sit out of the direct current. As far as inside or outside bends are concerned there are times when the fish are deep and I will look at outside bends only but it is best to check them both out because they could be on one side or the other or both. These river fish will move quite a bit and key in on different types of structure durring different times of day, times of the year and at most times the opposite of what I am trying. The wing dikes are a great area to look around and will usually have several different types of water on or around them.
    For river fishing, a wise man once told me to break each section down into little lakes and try to put the fish on a pattern. You have your inside bends, outside bends, straight aways, flats, deep holes, sand, mud, rock revetments, creek channels, sloughs and all different types of structure. When you find a fish try to figure out the structure he was on and if you find a few try to key in on why they were there. Most importantly when you figure all of that out please shoot me a pm and let me know.
     
  7. Ranger482V

    Ranger482V New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks Ryan, yes, i'm not bad at catching "bait" :smile2: Looks like I need bigger weights though. I've been using some 3 or 4 ouncers. They work ok behind the wing dams, but they like to roll a tad if you cast them out into the current. I try to anchor out of the current for the most part in my little 16ft jon. Better to be safe than sorry. Is there any certain depth you look for on these types of structure?
     
  8. stlcatman

    stlcatman New Member

    Messages:
    2,408
    State:
    Imperial, MO
    Tyler if you fish wing dikes on the Missouri your structure will vary quite a bit behind them. From what I have noticed you want to try the ends of the dike in the deep water on the seam of the current in summer. Also where there is a blow out there will be a hole and that is a great spot to try as well. Look for a hump or a rock pile in that hole and fish the back side of that. There is a lot of structure on that Missouri River and I have definately not figured that river out yet. Here on the Mississippi I will always be looking for humps or structure behind the dikes. A good hump that comes from 40' to 20' and falls back down on the back side is a likely spot. Just remember to key in on the current seam. Fish the water with little tornado swirls and keep that bait on the bottom. On the Missouri I would look for the ones with deeper holes at the front of the inside bend or if you can find one on an outside bend. In the summer those outside bends will have holes in certain places and if you can find a ledge or a hole on one of those it is worth a try. Trail dikes are still a bit of a mystery to me so I can't help you much there.

    As far as the weight issue go's it is very important to use the right amount of weight and heavier is better than too light. I use power pro and it will really let you know if you are on bottom. You can pick up the weight and feel it thump bottom. I use three way rigs and carolina style with no rolls, both seem to catch fish but the carolina style seems to twist up less with trash in the water. I hope this helps Tyler, this sport is addicting and once you get into a big blue or Flathead it will most likely be game over for most other fishing. Good luck and keep us posted.
     
  9. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Tyler, Ryan's right on. Not sure if he mentioned it, but I usually use 8oz weights as a good all-around weight.

    I don't fish behind the wing dams much (during the day that's usually where inactive fish are and at night they've usually moved out of there to feeding areas), but as Ryan said, the scour holes at the tips of the wing dams are pretty productive. As the weather warms up, you might be surprised by how shallow these fish are at night on the sand flats between the wing dams.

    Another likely spot I like is a trail or L dam with a good hole of water behind it. Setting up at the end of the dam and fishing paralell with the river along the seam created by the L dam and placing some baits on the flat inside the L dam is a set up I use quite a bit.

    This time of year steep mud cut banks can produce as fish run them looking for holes to spawn in.

    Good fresh cut bait (Ryan mentioned most of the best) is usually the ticket, although frisky live bluegill, small common carp or suckers (against the law to use live Asian carp) or bullheads are also a good option for baits.

    Fishing is kind of weird right now with the high water, but it also opens up some new types of areas - flooded flats covered with vegetation being one of my favorites.

    I'm not much help for daytime fishing as I'm pretty much nocturnal during the summer, but a good rule of thumb for me during the day is deep water with current.

    You're already ahead of the game if you're used to fishing for striped carp (sorry, couldn't resist:big_smile:) since you most likely have a good understanding of how to use your electronics to good advantage and can probably think well outside the envelope of what I might think of as far as presentation and rigs.

    As Ryan said, hammering a big fish can induce serious addiction to monster chasing. The peace and quiet of the river as compared to a crowded lake can also be habit forming. Good luck with catting as well as bassing and hope you get into a big cat!
     
  10. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Also, forgot to mention, on the MO you're pretty safe in a 16' jon. I know some will disagree with me, but the most important factor in the safety of any boat, whether a 16' jon or an aircraft carrier, is the captain:wink:

    There's much less barge traffic on the MO and while it can seem a bit more treacherous than the Miss, once you learn the nav markers (if you haven't already) and how to "read" the water, you'll be fine. Pay attention, watch out for trash, and use your head and the river is (in my opinion) safer than a lake where you have to worry about what the other 500 people in big boats and jet skis are doing:smile2:
     
  11. theonecatfishbob

    theonecatfishbob New Member

    Messages:
    4,100
    State:
    Wright City, Missouri
    I pulled hoop nets and trammel nets for 2 years out of a 16x48 jon boat. Like Brandon said, it up to you to create the safety.
     
  12. Ranger482V

    Ranger482V New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks Branden and Bob, I don't have a problem navigating the river. Ive been on the Mississippi and Missouri quite a bit, but just have never done that much fishing on them. I guess the only thing that worries me about anchoring up in the current is having something get tangled in the anchor line. I always have a knife handy, but with water flowing as fast as it does on the Missouri it wouldn't take long to get in trouble. I would be going out now, but I don't want to fight the high water and trash. My dad grew up in Quincy, IL, so I learned a lot about the rivers from him. He used to spend his summers in a cabin his grandparents used to own, but it got washed away in 1993. Oh well...thanks again guys, I guess I just need to saturate some bait. After all, I didn't learn to bass "bait" fish from sitting on a computer. I'll figure it out, just give me some time. Maybe a little gas money too! :wink:
     
  13. Ryan 57

    Ryan 57 New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Illinios
    Welcome 2 the BOC Tyler. Ryan is right. One big fish and your hooked. I used to do nothing but bass and crappie fish. Two years ago one of my buddies got me to go out on the river one night and we caught some nice fish. Every since then I can't get enough. When I thought of catfishing I thought of a farm pond and stinkbait, one nice fish changed my thinking real quick, this is a whole new ballgame. Good luck out there and keep us all posted:big_smile: