Mississippi River advice

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by SkipEye, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Okay, I know this will be moved but really wanted it here where you locals could see it first and offer useful real-life advice based on our local conditions.

    Willie's motor troubles have really got me thinking about putting that trolling motor on a little quicker than planned.

    • Is a 12v model (about 55lb thrust) gonna cut it on a 20 foot jon in the river? I really don't want to have to add a third battery.:eek:oooh: (I keep the start battery by itself nowadays.:embarassed:
    • How about foot control versus hand control for a BOW mounted motor?
    • Do you use yours much catfishin'?
     
  2. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    We use the auto pilot for drift fishing Darryl. Saves on having to re adjust steering all the time. Another good one is the maxxum. Your going to want a 24 volt in 70-80 lb. thrust.
     

  3. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Darryl, I have one of the older Minn Kotta B65's. It is a hand operated, stern mounted style. I rarely use it. It can come in handy for sneaking up on shad in the creeks. As for as using it in the river in an emergency, I wouldn't know. I figure if it will help guide me to the bank, with the current, I'm happy. Anything to get out of the main channel away from barges. That would be nasty and more than likely ruin your whole day.
     
  4. Grumper

    Grumper New Member

    Messages:
    2,277
    State:
    Crystal City MO
    Long story short, I'd be catfish food right now, if it wasn't for a minn kota. Our boat motor locked up a couple years ago at 1 in the morning on the Mississippi. Almost got hit by a northbound loaded barge. We barely missed it thanks to the Minn Kota. I will not own a boat without one, or go out without one for that matter.
     
  5. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Thats what I was afraid of. Guess I'll just spend the extra $$$$$ and be done. My two bank onboard charger can take care of both Deep cycle batts. I'm sure the alternator will keep a good enough charge on the start battery as that is all it is used for any more.

    Troy, does yours have the foot control or what? I'm just not sure if I want that dang thing cluttering up the boat. I mean I ain't bass fishing you know.:crazy::crazy::crazy:

    Plus Cooks Boats cut off the "extra" factory orange wire that SHOULD HAVE been for a 24v motor. Guess I'll have to run another one. Still don't know why they would cut it off.:angry: I could splice into it but not sure I want to do that either.
     
  6. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Thanks Gary, your story is the one that really hit home for me. Talk about a pucker factor.

    I am going to go ahead and get one.

    I have to stop hemorraghing cash getting this new boat outfitted. :eek:oooh::eek:oooh::eek:oooh:
     
  7. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Thats good to hear Kutter. And here I didn't think they could hear you with all that rain beating down on the surface.:smile2:
     
  8. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    The auto pilot is on Jims boat Darryl. It does have the foot control, he used to have a remote that you can wear on your wrist but it quit working. You can get a remote wireless pad to run from any where in the boat though. Other wise yes you will have a lot of wires to trip over.

    Mine is a hand steer model on my boat and for no more than your probably going to be useing it that may be the way to go. It may be better to put it on the back of the boat depending on how your seating is for ease of use? I have mine in the back and bought a extension handle so I can reach it easier.

    Your bank charger will work fine and as long as your not running other things to your starter battery your alternator will keep it up.
    I would take it back and have them re-wire the one they cut. You will be much happier with the 24 volt.
     
  9. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    On a lake like the Mississippi River, it might work. But it'll be worthless on a real river like the Missouri.

    I had a 70 lb 24V motor on my 18 ft boat and could barely make any progress against the Missouri River current. Upgraded to an 80 lb model recently but haven't tried to use it in the current yet. (the upgrade wasn't so I could use it to go upstream on the river, BTW)

    Never used a hand control motor, but did recently switch from a cable-steer model to an electric-steer with Autopilot. Can't imagine how I got along without the Autopilot for so long - makes life *so* much easier when looking for bait - you engage autopilot, the boat keeps going the direction you told it to while you fight with the net or whatever. Sweet. Bought it mostly for drifting on Truman Lake, as I have a knack for showing up on days when there's zero wind...

    Not on the river, except for getting bait. On the lake, I use it all the time to control the direction of my drift. Intend to learn how to drift fish on the river with it but haven't had a chance to do so yet.
     
  10. Grumper

    Grumper New Member

    Messages:
    2,277
    State:
    Crystal City MO
    I think it is an excellent purchase. Heck just ask Cuz about running out of gas, and using his to get back to the dock. LMAO!!!!:smile2: But seriously, I use mine alot when I'm by myself in a creek or tributary getting bait. I have a foot controlled minn-kota All Terrain. Its a 12V, 50lb, and it get's my little 17 footer around just fine.:wink:
     
  11. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    What extra wire is that? All you need is 2 wires to run the 24V motor, not 3 like I think you're thinking. The batteries are wired in series; that's where the 24V comes from. The trick is in using wire of a big enough gage to carry all that current up to the front of the boat.

    Has Cabela's sent you their special limited-edition hard-cover catalog yet? If not, you haven't spent near enough on your boat... :crazy:
     
  12. Grumper

    Grumper New Member

    Messages:
    2,277
    State:
    Crystal City MO
    Come on now!!!!!!!!! We've got alot of current down here!! Lol!:roll_eyes:
     
  13. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    I know some of the guys that do a controled drift on the river have went to the 36 volt with 100# thrust and better.
    That should get your a catalog Darryl.....
     
  14. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    I think the older trolling motors were 12/24 (selectable) so you wired each battery seperately to the motor and it did the switching internally maybe????

    Anyway, I know how to wire them in series yada yada yada. Not a problem.
     
  15. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    The deed is done anyway.


    Came home with the MotorGuide Wireless Bow Mount Motor - W75, 48" Composite Shaft, 24v, 75lb thrust, wireless foot pedal, no wires to get in the way. Plus a second deep cycle batt for the boat.:eek:oooh::eek:oooh::eek:oooh:



    Hope its enough for the Lake-Like Mississippi River as Marty put it. Man I hope I can be as macho as those MO River boys someday when I grow up. :smile2::smile2::smile2:

    No offense taken Marty.
     
  16. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    That's OK - I'll keep trying...
     
  17. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    Oh - in the spirit of full disclose (and before Josh calls me out once again for being a complete phony), I've never actually been on the Mississippi River, though I did spell it correctly in the 5th grade spelling bee some years ago...

    So my assertion regarding the current or lack of same in that body of water is mostly based on educated guesses and anecdotal evidence gathered here and elsewhere...
     
  18. TN Greg

    TN Greg Member

    Messages:
    627
    State:
    MO
    Gary's and Willie's stories slapped me in the face with a little bit of reality as well. Thanks for the heads up. I would be interested as to some of the other dangers out there I never thought of that now include 1) don't get the anchor roped tangled around the prop or you will be swimming quick and 2) don't be without some power to get out of the way we things go wrong as you may be engulfed by a barge. They same pretty obvious now, but I wonder what else the brotherhood has encountered.....

    I would also be interested to hear about who to call in case of an emergency (obviously 911 is an option), what channels do the barges and other folks monitor on the radio, how do you know if a barge wants to dock where I may be sitting, and the extent a barge will go out of their way to avoid a boat in case of an emergency (if at all).....
     
  19. Grumper

    Grumper New Member

    Messages:
    2,277
    State:
    Crystal City MO
    Actually, the Mississippi above the MO. confluence is pretty much like a lake. Once you get south, below all the locks, the current moves at a pretty good clip. My buddy works for Artco Barge Co. out of St.Louis and he says the swiftest part of the Mississippi is between St.Louis and Ste.Genevieve, due to a drop in elevation. I don't know if there is any truth to it, but he is a barge captain, he should know. I have never measured the current speed, but if you are in the main channel and you aren't on plane, you will be moving backwards, or not moving at all.:wink:
     
  20. Grumper

    Grumper New Member

    Messages:
    2,277
    State:
    Crystal City MO
    First of all, I don't know about all areas, but around here it's pretty much a rural area, so Cell phone reception is limited. My buddies boat blew up last year, and he had to walk through the woods at night to get a signal. Now I run a VHF radio. I usually will keep it on channel 16. This part of the river is full of commercial traffic, so the odds of somebody picking you up are good. Some of your fancier radio's you can actually send your GPS coordinates over the radio when you send a distress call. BTW. A barge usually won't get out of the way at all. Some times they will back off the power if you can get ahold of them on your VHF. But in all reality, you can see em coming for a long way, and if you have a good trolling motor, you can usually get out of the way without a problem. Just make sure your batteries are charged and the motor is actually wired up. I run with too many guys that take things for granted, and will go out all night with dead batteries, just because they are too lazy to throw the batteries on charge. What a gamble!! I have fished places before where I have been in the way. Usually the barge captain will sound a horn or say something over their PA speaker if you are in the way. If all else fails, keep a list of BOCer's that would come help you out in an emergency. All these guys down here know that I would come to their rescue any time, day or night.:wink: