Making a snare??

Discussion in 'Trapping & Fur Taking' started by lamudslinger76, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. lamudslinger76

    lamudslinger76 New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    Louisiana
    I'm trying to learn about trapping and I'd like to build a snare. Anyone have any suggestions or instructions? Thanks.
     
  2. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Try SOUTHEASTERN OUTDOORS they sell snares and cable,locks ,ferruls etc
     

  3. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    OOPs That should be Southeastern Outdoor Supplies inc. they dont have a web site but if you do a search you will be able to get ph# address and a review
     
  4. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    The simple(est) snare I always used, and free, was a guitar string. The smooth wire 1-3 has a ferrel already spliced on the end and works great for rabbit or squirrel. Got a friend plays guitar, your in business....always kept a few in the kit with the Kabar.
    :smile2:
     
  5. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    you can google trapping supplies or snaring to find instructions on building snares. I would also check your state laws to see if its legal in your state and if it has to be a relaxing type snare or not as it is here in Ohio. 3/32" aircraft cable is about the best all around snare cable for almost all fur bearing animals except beaver, then I would go with 1/8". You want to use the largest size cable you can get by with to prevent fur damage.
     
  6. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    I've made my own for years.
    I use both 3/32 and 1/8 aircraft cable. You can buy both locally . Its used as garage door cable.
    I use several things as cable stops but the easiest is 3/32 nuts. You can buy them at any hardware store or check out menards or lowes.Just hammer them on
    Snare locks are made by drilling 2 holes in a washer 180 degrees from each other. And then bending the washer 90 degrees between the 2 drilled holes.
    I also make my own swivels out of shim washers. drill 1 hole in the washer and bend it 90 degrees so its shaped like an L. Install swivel on before the last cable stop.
    Make the snares 4 feet long and use it twice.It will be twisted beyond use after your first catch but the other end will work fine. Just cut off a stop thread the swivel and snare lock off and turn them around and hammer on another cable stop.
    Fence pliers work just fine for cutting aircraft cable.
    hope this helps
    best of luck
    just

    PS they cost less than a buck apiece
     
  7. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    That's what I do. A guitar string works great and i always have a few dozen around.
     
  8. Tiny

    Tiny New Member

    Messages:
    118
    State:
    Oklahoma
    the most common thing I've seen guys use snares for around here are coyote and beaver. the game wardens cut trappers a little slack on using snares when they're catching coyote and beaver as there's a conflicting law but if they go by the book then you can't use snares in oklahoma ... in order to use them you have to speak with the warden but anyhow ... there's a way to prevent them from getting twisted up too badly on the beaver and that's to set them on drowners with a wire attached to shore and a weight thrown out on the other end of the wire to deep enough water so that the beaver can't move the weight ... it's gotta be pretty big as I've had a 40 lb beaver pull my weight completely out of the water and I was using 3 cinder blocks and a leghold trap. I was removing beaver from a farmer's pond because they were cutting a grove in his dam. that's also a way to get more trapping area available to you as well ... offer your services to the local farmers to get rid of problem animals for hunting and trapping rights. when I was trapping I had more land available to me doin that than I had time to hunt.

    anyhow if you set the snares on drowners they'll last a lot longer as they won't have anything solid to twist against and their natural instinct will make them jump into the water ... coyotes are a little more reluctant but bobcat, coon and beaver will drown themselves pretty quick ... the beaver drown pretty fast I think because they aren't really concerned with taking a breath of air then they get caught usually (it seems that's the reason anyhow). when you attach the drowner to the wire you use one of the L locks like mentioned above in another post and attach it so that the only direction they can go on the wire is down into the water.