Looking to buy a basset hound

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Monsterkat11, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. Monsterkat11

    Monsterkat11 New Member

    Messages:
    297
    State:
    Ohio
    i'm looking to buy a basset hound in ohio, preferably around the dayton area, i'm looking to spend around 250 to 300 if you, or someone you know breeds them or you can maybe find one for a decent price please let me know

    thank you,
    korey
     
  2. FS Driver

    FS Driver New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    swansea,illinoi
    bassetts are comical looking and can be great fun , but they are also head strong their nose can get them into trouble and the bugle bark can be annoying to neighbors .
    just wanted to let you know that they arent the easiest breed to own.
    we have a 2 year old FRANK and he is a big baby . as long as i , or the others in the family are outside he is fine and dandy and will lay around content.
    but as soon as we come inside and he is alone out there the bugleing begins:roll_eyes:.
    he also stinks like an old hound dog. ( not a little but alot )
    their skin has an oil they secreet that is designed to make the scent they are
    following cling to them better.
    his ears need to be cleaned weekly as they get smelly also if not attended to regularly.
    other than that hes an awesome dog .....as awesome as a stinky old dog with elongated body, short stubby legs, and ears that sweep the floor can be.
    :wink:

    any how if you lived closer the people we got ours from have a few litters each year from 3 differant females .
    good luck.
     

  3. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    They also bite. Not only a stranger but you.
     
  4. Cattledogz

    Cattledogz Active Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
    NC
    Korey,
    For what purpose are you wanting a Basset? Strictly as a pet? Looking for a quality hunting dog?

    The reason I ask is you need to do your homework. In other words, educate yourself first. If you are wanting a good pet then you don't want to go to a breeder that breeds for hunting stock. If you want a dog from proven hunt lines you don't want to go to just any back yard breeder that doesn't even know if they are producing pet quality pups. Make sure you know what to look for in a reputable breeder. Know what questions to ask! Look at the parents! Look at the conditions the pups are raised in, the parents are kept in, etc. If Hunting Champions in the line are all more than 3 generations back its useless except as an advertisement ploy to uneducated buyers.


    If you are looking for a pet and good companion why not consider a basset hound rescue group instead of buying one? Save a life that way!

    If you are not truly familiar with the breed, make sure to become familiar with them before buying one. What DRC said is true. They do have an odor, they are prone to ear problems, they don't like being alone.
    Due to so much poor breeding they are also prone to other health problems On the flip side, if you are prepared to responsibly care for one and love it as it loves you, be its companion, spend quality time with it, he or she will repay you with unlimited, unconditional love for as long as you give it the chance to do so.

    Here is a link to the National Basset Hound Club. There is a ton of valuable information on their site about the breed, about breeders, rescue groups, etc. You will find links to breeders and rescue groups for your state as well. Hope it helps.

    Basset Hound Club of America
     
  5. Cattledogz

    Cattledogz Active Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
    NC
    As can all dogs John. :wink:
     
  6. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I have a basset I picked up from animal control. One of the best dogs I have ever been associated with. Poor girl is deaf though. I haven't noticed any odor with her, except when she tied it on with a skunk...not sure who won that one. I have noticed she seems to limp a lot in her front quarter. By doing some research on the web, I found that with the elongated, heavy body, bassets are prone to spinal injury. They say not to let one jump as it will more than likely become injured. I go along with the rescue group...there are some which are dedicated to the basset breed. But, I also would encourage you to study the breeds a little more carefully. I don't think we need any more Vicks in the animal world.
     
  7. FS Driver

    FS Driver New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    swansea,illinoi
    barbs idea about rescue pups is a good idea . if they have them in your area you could save some $ and help a little basset out of a jam.
    the breeder we got ours from has the parents there at the premisis and they have a large climate controlled barn that has their quarters inside with access to outside . they do not have hunting stock so these are strictly couch taters but they are well cared for.
    lawrence came up with a point i forgot to mention and that is the joint pains they tend to get. ours will limp around a bit when he first gets up some days and he is still really young. he does however get up on the couch and they are not supposed to do alot of jumping as it causes joint problems .
    lawrence you are lucky yours dont emit this odor i spoke of. it is bad enough to make the wife say to keep him off the couch .
    he is a loveing pet and has a good tempermant for the most part. he sure will let us know if a stranger is here. between the bostons and him we are well alerted:eek:oooh::tounge_out::roll_eyes:
     
  8. Cattledogz

    Cattledogz Active Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
    NC
    DRC and Awshucks,
    That limping could actually be dysplasia. In the front its elbow dysplasia and in the rear its hip dysplasia.

    Used to be it was heard of only in larger breeds. But again, thanks to irresponsible and indiscriminate breeding, dysplasia has become commonplace in a large majority of breeds regardless of the size of the dogs. It has also progressed from just the hips being affected to often being just as likely that the elbows will be affected as well.

    With the long bodies they are very susceptible to spinal injuries and arthritis.

    There is one product that I swear by for any dog that is prone to joint problems. It is a little pricey but well worth it given the results I have seen time and time again in many dogs with joint problems including all 4 of mine. The product is called Synovi-G3 and comes as granules you can put on their food or as moist chews you can give as a treat. I feed my dogs twice a day and give them one chew at each feeding. A lot of people use Glucosamine-Chondroitin Tabs and while better than nothing the Synovi has all the added essentials that dogs require and the results speak for themselves. The Synovi is available through Veterinarians or through Vet med supply companies with a vet prescription.

    DRC, the best thing I found for the odor is by Lambert Kay called Fresh 'N Clean Dog Shampoo and Cream Rinse. You want the Classic or Original scent, not the flea/tick or baking soda. Use both the shampoo and follow with the conditioner and it works great! The scent does last for a few weeks too.
     
  9. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    I don't know why they love us so much & vice versa...just meant to be I guess. But the best thing bout dogs is the early warning system, an in the house the "Who farted?" scenario. And Darryl, if your anything like me, it may not be the dog. LOL.....take a shower and check again. I'm not a vet but I've always thought people smell worse than any critter this side of a pole cat or badger.

    :crazy:
     
  10. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Ya wanna Bassett, eh? You gonna use it as a scent dog or a tracker like it was originally bred for? Bred to be a dwarf (Achondrodysplastic) and usually in three colors so you could see it easily in the brush. Bred to be a "pack" animal. It likes company and that does not necessarily mean people. Cute cuddly when puppies they grow up to be 60-80 lbs unless you let them become lard butts and then their belly hangs on the ground and their back goes to pot. Unless exercised outdoors routinely and allowed to have air run through their ears, which they use to trap air to hold scent better, they typically have their ears begin to smell like last weeks garbage and you have to clean them routinely. They slobber and bay, not bark. Can get on your or the neighbors nerves.

    Breeders, those low lives that try and make a buck off you have bred so much evil genetics in them that they can be walking disasters medically. Elbow and hip dysplasia, OCD (Osteochondritis dessicans) a disease of the shoulder joint, bad temperament, third eyelid problems, allergy's, usually manifested as seborrheic dermatitis. Pad and nail problems in a house environment, with elbow and hock ulcers not uncommon.

    Barb and DRC are wonderful people. They have told you well. Find out about the breed first, before you go to a breeder. Stay away from them until you have to go. And when you go, go to more than one. I am sure you are an intelligent man. A dog is no better than the environment you see it raised in. If the breeder is a goofball, buy a car instead. But then you have to deal with a car salesman and I don't know which is worse.

    I am not telling you not to get this kind of dog, or any kind of dog for that matter. Just be aware of what you are dealing with. I used to see a lot of them. I had to take care of their problems. In my case I felt bad for the dog, either because the owner was useless or the breeder had screwed up the dogs genetics so bad the dog couldn't cope with what he inherited.

    So good luck to you young feller.

    Barb I am really interested in that product you talked about. We use Chondroitin sulfate now on a young dog my wife got from the pound. She has OCD and I am too cheap to take her to one of those expensive Vets. Heheh

    John
     
  11. Monsterkat11

    Monsterkat11 New Member

    Messages:
    297
    State:
    Ohio
    hey guys' i appreciate all the replies and information! i've done my homework and realized yes, they are stubborn and kind of hard to train, i know that it takes longer than most dogs to get the point across, not to mention notoriously hard to house break.
    as far as the barking goes when you're not around, i've read up and it looks like crate training is the best for that, once your dog knows his crate is his special spot, he's ok with being there alone and won't bark. i know that basset hounds and beagles have separation anxiety.

    when i was growing up we got a beagle. i think the beagle and the basset hound are very similar in their ways. for this reason, i am confident i can help overcome some of the problems you've talked about. our beagle peanut, has learned when it's ok to bark and when not to bark. i used to take her out to the woods to run almost daily, as i am planning to do with this pup, i know how to train them for running rabbits, which i'm planning to do with this dog. i'm not so much training it for a hunting dog, but you could say more of both. i'd like a dog i could take out with the family when we go on our hunts which is very rare anymore. but i'd still like to have him trained for it anyway. i also want just a pet for around the house.
    also, the beagle has problems with her ears as well and they need to be cleaned too, so i realize that portion.
    i live in an apartment for the time being but we are on the hunt for a house to rent. a house with a big back yard that is fenced in.
    the problem i see with rescuing a dog is that the chances of you finding a 6 week old basset hound pup is pretty slim, and i feel once the dog gets older, he'll probably already be set in his ways. i found a good breeder who is willing to sell me a pup, i'm planning on picking him up sometime next week.
    while we're still at the apartment (which shouldn't be long) i plan on walking him everyday and taking him out to the river and the woods three times week.
    my roomate has a boston terrier and they should get along just fine.
    one of my biggest concerns as of right now is the length i've time it takes them to get the point to do their business outside, but if i thought it was going to be too much, i wouldn't consider it. i know i can do this and i know i'll have a good dog!

    i appreciate your information and concerns, i hope this helps maybe narrow down the situation, any other information i would love to hear, any responses to this i would love to hear! if i need corrected please by all means correct me!
    thanks everyone!
     
  12. Monsterkat11

    Monsterkat11 New Member

    Messages:
    297
    State:
    Ohio
    also thanks alot for the basset hound site barb it really helped