Looking for help selecting an anchor

Discussion in 'Boating' started by JPritch, Nov 7, 2007.

  1. JPritch

    JPritch New Member

    Messages:
    1,852
    State:
    Lynchburg, VA
    Was wondering if there is a noticable difference in performance between a Chene anchor and a Digger anchor. They both look nearly identical with the two flukes and appear to anchor in the same manner. Just looks like the Digger has some extra functionality which makes it cost more, and the Chene is alot lighter. Also looking at a Richter anchor. Kind of torn as to what I should get. I fish a tidal river and the bottom is mostly muddy, but it can vary from spot to spot. My river anchor is not giving me the hold I need, even with chain and a high scope. If you all have any suggestions, I would appreciate them. I'm also upgrading my rope, the twisted nylon I have is coming apart before my eyes. Gonna go with a braid this time.
     
  2. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,447
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Joshua,
    I use an 18lb Richter with seven pounds of chain (25lb total) and it holds great on the Ohio river. I also have another that I came up with myself made from steel angle that will hold even when the river is absolutely cranking along. If you have access to some shop tools and can weld I could send you some pictures...W
     

  3. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    this is my anchor
    I use 4" steel pipe with either 2 or 3 plow sweeps welded on it. it is bulky but weights around 15lbs and holds FANTASTIC. If you need it heavier then fill the pipe with concrete.
     

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  4. willcat

    willcat New Member

    Messages:
    2,463
    State:
    texas
    any ideas as to which one to use on a 21ft pontoon, also when i need to use 2 of them in the wind what is the best way????
     
  5. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    I know to many people that have lost diggers and other types of anchors. I no longer spend money on an anchor that will not hold when you need it too.
    I don't know what the speed of your rivers in VA.. I know ours is one of the faster moving rivers. Average speed is 3mph, when it's cooking it's upwards of 6mph. This style of anchor will hold every time.

    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=54054
     
  6. ncfowler

    ncfowler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,630
    State:
    NC
    Name:
    Jeff
    I have two diffrent anchors on my boat one fluke and one a mushroom river anchor. the rull of thumb for mushroom anchors is 1lb per foot i have a 18' boat but use a 20lb river anchor with 3' of chain on it, i use this one with rockey bottoms when i'm in areas where the bottom is soft i pull out the fluke, I use the type where the anchor line ring can be slid all the way down to the fluke which makes it easy to retrive when pulling up anchor. also i have about 3' of chain on it as well, the chain helps keep the anchor down so it can dig into the bottom, also make sure you let out alot of line before you set yor anchor this will help keep the anchor at the right angle for best secure anchoring. Keep you anchor line as long as possible this will help keep the anchor form losing its grab, in rough water where wave and wakes are a issue i will put out almost 7x the depth of line ie:10' deep 70' of line
    I hope this will give you the answer your looking for.
     
  7. rspd507

    rspd507 New Member

    Messages:
    729
    State:
    Rising Sun,IN
    I have two styles of anchors in my 16ft boat. I use the navy style anchor out of the front, with a river anchor off the back if im going to anchor sideways. I personally believe that the navy anchor is by far the better of the two. However, it can get hung up at times. This happened not long ago with me having to use the motor to break it loose. I say in heavy current, the navy anchor is what id have to go with. But, that just my opinion. rspd507
     
  8. RIVER-RAT

    RIVER-RAT New Member

    Messages:
    3,128
    State:
    MO / MT
    I've used the fluke style, river anchor, mushroom river anchor and wasn't overly impressed on any of them. I fish the Mississippi for the most part and recently made that style of anchor that crazy posted. That by far is the BEST anchor I've used to date! It will hold in very heavy current, sandy bottoms, rocky bottoms, and you don't have to let out a bunch of rope to get the proper holding "angle" like you do with the fluke style. I highly recommend this anchor and best of all, you can make it!!! I will NEVER buy another anchor again!
     
  9. Malichi1970

    Malichi1970 New Member

    Messages:
    1,334
    State:
    Fenton, Missouri
    I've heard nothing but great things about those style of home-made anchors. But, for those of us that don't know how to weld or have the tools or know how on how to pour lead is there a anchor that will hold in most currents that we can make ourselves?
     
  10. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Where there's a will, there's southern engineering. Obviously, the heavier the rebar, the harder it is to bend; smaller rebar definitely needs to have the top 'eye' welded shut. But, use heavy enough rebar, and it doesn't need to be welded shut. For that matter, if you get just the right size rebar and don't weld it shut, that can be a safety factor. If your anchor hangs up and can't be retreived, pulling hard enough with the boat will unbend the 'eye', and all you'll lose is the anchor itself, rather than cutting the line and losing anchor, chain, and line. As for pouring lead, well there's plenty of posts on this board to help you with that. And I'll repeat my question that I made in another place: What about using concrete instead of lead? No, it doesn't weigh as much, size for size, but all you'd have to do is make the anchor a little larger to get the same weight.
     
  11. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Jerry, I have made a couple of these lead anchors with rebar.

    The rebar is brittle, you are not going to be able to bend it sharp enough without heating it up to cherry red, so you might as well weld it too. You need at least a cutting torch setup to bend it. A hand held propane will not get hot enough.
     
  12. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Interesting. I never heard before that rebar is brittle. I had a couple of other types of anchors I was planning to make using rebar, but since my welder is electric, I guess none of them will come to pass.
     
  13. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl

    I think just a straight Acetylene torch would be enough but I had the oxygen tank also. Thats definately enough.

    Or borrow one.

    You could also heat up the rebar if you clamp the electrodes on the rebar from your welder and shoot some current through it. That would be the hard way though but I think it would work.
     
  14. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    You can also use a chunk of 1" black Iron pipe, Cap, eye bolt and a flange ment to attach it to the floor.

    get about a 2' chunk of 1' black iron pipe with both ends threaded. Screw on the floor flange to one end. This will be the end You cast the lead around, and gives the lead something to grab onto.

    Take the Cap and drill a hole large enough to put Your eyebolt through, use nuts on both the insde and outside of the cap and lock the eyebolt into place. Screw this onto the other end of the pipe. Attach Your anchor rode to the eye.

    simple simple simple, most guys have the tools lying around the house and the materials can be had at Your local hardware store for very little money.