Long fishing rods for rivers and brush

Discussion in 'Fishing Rod Review' started by mtrimble, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. mtrimble

    mtrimble New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    oklahoma
    I use an 8 ft croix classic cat for most of my river fishing. However, I've been thinking alot lately about a super long rod in the 15-17 ft range. Im not interested in casting distance as much as I am reaching distance. I scale river banks alot in search of log jams and other spots I might find some flatheads. It would be nice if I had a really long and sensitive rod I could probe logjams with without climbing all over them and creating a bunch of racket. I saw an article on long rods in catfish insider a year or two ago. Some of these rods were homemade.

    These rods are almost like long crappie rods but with a stronger spine. Ive checked every pawn shop in town with no success. I checked bass pro and they carry a rod like this that can take line up to 25 lbs. I also spoke with a custom rod builder but he just had a vague idea of what I wanted. Do you guys know what im talking about? I've been dreaming about fighting a catfish on a really long flexible and sensitive rod. It just sounds like alot of fun in my mind.
     
  2. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I have been using long multi piece,and teliscopic poles for years.Check out the threads under reels,ALVEY,and under rods WHATS SO NEGITIVE ABOUT TWO PIECE RODS?,both peewee-williams.I have bought teliscopic Shooting*Star ss-10S Series flip pole rods up to 20 ft.and rated up to twenty lb.test line,from Catfish Connection.I don;t see the 16 & 20s in the new catolog.Contact them.they may be able to help you.I have a 14ft.preditor rod,and a 16 ft.teliscopic rod from cabelas.I have a 16 ft.3 pcs.Wally Marshall rod from Bass Pro,rated for 25 lb.line.All these rods ae spinning,except the Cabelas preditor and the Wally Marshall,which can be used for both.If your rod is too limber,you cain;t lift a heavy catch over things.Hope this helps.peewee-williams
     

  3. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    I am afraid you will be giving up one of the most important things you need to fight a flathead in a log jam "Leverage". With a long rod like you are talking about you will have no leverage to fight him with. What I am saying is you will not be able to control were he goes, He will control the fight from his end. Shorter rods supply more leverage, which is something you need in this situation.

    Advice is free, Just trying to help:eek:
     
  4. sal_jr

    sal_jr New Member

    Messages:
    1,390
    State:
    Ithaca, MI
    Drednaught, I have to disagree with you sir!

    Many times, I have borrowed long rods for flatheadding in heavy cover till I got my own 13 foot 6 incher.
    Partly because the river edge is grown over and the reach helps the cast, but moreso..... When I lift that flag pole in the air after a hookset, that ole fish's head WILL TURN. Cant say that of a 7 footer. A 7 footer may turn it a lil, but that 13 and a half footer will keep the fish from bolting under the log, brining him closer to the surface and away from the jam so I can fight him in more open, less dangerous surroundings.

    I hav seen flatties strip lesser rods and tie a fella up. I have NOT seen that happen in the case of big-rod fishermen. the 4 guys I go with all have 10 footers or more. The river we typically fish gets no wider than 100 feet and no deeper than 8 foot on average with the occasional hole above 12 and two deep holes at 20. Leverage is the reason to have a rod that big in my opinion. and that big rod is a 3 piece rod too.... with 80lb spiderline fusion on a 309 penn. Nothing can snag me up. Nothing.


    -sal
     
  5. dgde4x4man

    dgde4x4man New Member

    Messages:
    466
    State:
    La Moille, Illinois
  6. Okccatman

    Okccatman New Member

    Messages:
    323
    State:
    Norman,Ok
    What about a cane pole? I have a 20 foot cane pole and it is sensitive but yet has some backbone. Just a thought.

    David Frantz
     
  7. james

    james New Member

    Messages:
    747
    State:
    Blue Ridge texa
    Not sure about useing long ones for cats but ive used long fly rods with tiny zebcos on them for jigging for sandies and crappie in the creeks around here works really good. able to reach the log jams without haveing to walk ontop of them risking falling in.
     
  8. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    OOPS!! My preditor rod is 12 ft.,not 14.Being able to swing the tip of these long poles away from cover,with the fish on,is a advantage.A 13lb.Bowfin is the largest fish that I have ever caught on a 20ft.pole.I was a young and heathy industrial mechanic then.I worked shift work by my self,and was used to heavy lifting and straining.At times,I cannot hold the pole alone now.(illness)Leverage counts.The longer the pole,the more leverage the fish has.Everyone is different physically.REMEMBER,the longer the pole,the harder it is to get a fish close enough to you,to net,without breaking the pole.Most,but not all of my broken poles have been due to this.This is why I love a fly rod with a spinning reel on it.Most fly rods are limber enough that you can bring the fish right up to you.To get to one of my best spots,you climbed about 18 feet up the tree,then walked about 12ft.out on a large limb.This was the only way to fish it,and you had to use a teliscopic rod,or pole.Great spot,untill the tree fell into the river,and carried everything with it.Not worth a hoot now.peewee-williams
     
  9. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    Sal my man, May I tell you a couple of short stories?Don Drose perhaps the premier guide on Santee,fishes 7 ft Ugly sticks BIG baitcasters and 120lb Spiderwire.As Don tells it,.Fish hits the center rod on the right side of his 27ft Maycraft boat.15 year old picks up rod and is almost pulled over the side but his father grabs ahold of him until it looks like he can't hold the rod.Don takes the rod and the fish swims slowly down the side of the boat with Don working on him,fish turns right and swims slowly behind the boat,Don can't gain anything but isn't losing either,fish turns right again and swims slowly up the other side of the boat,Don hanging on,fish then turns away from the boat and as Don says "got really mad" about then and accelerates until the line is smoking going out.Don realizes disaster is approaching and places both bare thumbs against the spool in a desperate attempt to turn the fish.No good,Don loses all skin on two thumbs and the fish pops the line when it get to the end of the spool.No one can even speak!I fish with 7 ft Penn Slammer rods that look like pool cues,Penn 7500 reels and 80lb braid.Fish picks up bait and swims slowly towards the toon,without pausing or even noticing that I am lifting for all I'm worth. Swims under the boat pulling me over the rail and the rod is bent UNDER the toon.My friend is holding me in the boat with my belt.Fish never slows down until the rod tip snaps and the lines cuts instantly on the metal pontoon.The fish finishes eating my bait and picks his teeth with the rod tip.The point is I think it may be better to say "Nothing can snag me up that I'm likely to encounter in this river,never". Nothing and Never are very permanent ,terminal words and are just waiting to be exceeded!No criticsm intended.;) :)
     
  10. sal_jr

    sal_jr New Member

    Messages:
    1,390
    State:
    Ithaca, MI
    Jim,

    Having never been blessed with such a situation, I will stand by what I said until God grants me such a fish of a lifetime.

    Be rest-assured that when it happens, I will use my bloody thumb-stumps to pound out a very descriptive apology directly to you. LOL

    :cool: :cool:
     
  11. bluecatnut

    bluecatnut New Member

    Messages:
    891
    State:
    freeburg illinois
    i have a 15ft silstar rod i used it for about 2 months now it is sitting in my garage because it is just to big for the places i fish but it would make a hell of a good open water pole
     
  12. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    for years, I used a 5/6 flyrod with an ultralite spinning reel on it, slip bobber rigged, and have had a blast catching channels to 8 pounds or so. It sure extended my reach and I lost very few fish. I have a 12 foot cabalas match rod now, with spinning reel and hope to be putting it to a big fish (over 10) test soon! A net is a must when using these limber rods, for the fish and the rod!
     
  13. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Don't confuse line movement with power. A long rod will move the line/hook further with a big jerk or pull, but can't produce as strong a pull as with a shorter rod. That's not saying that the pull you get with a long rod isn't strong enough for your purposes---it may very well be; it depends on the size of the fish. And if you can get all the power you need with a long rod, being able to pull the fish further with a single pull can be a great advantage. But, if you are after that 100# flattie in a logjam, you're probably better off with a short stiff rod. Some years back, I remember reading an article about catfishermen below Kentucky Dam using 1' sections of broomstick for rods to get maximum power.
    If you want to prove to yourself the difference, here's an experiment you can do for less than $5--or nothing if you have some good scrap. Buy a 20' length of the metal tubing that goes along the top of a chain link fence. Attach a 10# weight with light rope or heavy cord, grab the other end of the long pipe, and lift the weight...if you can. Now, cut a 4' or 5' section off the 20' piece (or use something similar), attach the 10# weight to one end, grab the other end, and lift the weight.
    Locally, the most commonly used rod for long distance casting is custom made from a 14' Fenwick blank. The older rods are better than the newer rods, because those older blanks were made in the USA, rather than over in the far east.
    As far as using a cane pole goes, I would only use a Calcutta. That's the one that has a very small hole down the center of the cane, rather than a large hole like the cane poles you generally see for bream or crappie fishing. In my younger days, we often made good surf rods from these Calcutta cane poles.
     
  14. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    I would kind of agree with jtrew stiffness is key, if you were on a teeter toter one site short one long the person on the longer end (the fishes end)wouldnt have to weight as mutch to lift the other. But could a 9 footer with the same stiffness as a stought 6 footer have a spring like advantage like a bungie. :confused: :0a36:
     
  15. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    I dont like the long rods myself,i like 8 footers because its a good all around size.I have a 10 foot silstar rod thats about brand new im trying to get rid of because i just dont like the feel of 10 footers and for some reason i cant cast them as far.I also feel i can horse bigger cats with the 8 footer better then the longer ones but thats just my opinion.
     
  16. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Glad to see I am not the only one that feels this way!!!:cool:
     
  17. roh1961

    roh1961 New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Texas
    What model rod and is it a conventional or spinning rod? You wanting all your money back or feeling so sorry for me that you would almost give it away? ;)
     
  18. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Phillip,I too have a Cabelas Match rod 12ft. 2-8 lb.line.I love the 2 feet of cork handle with the slip rings.It gives you 20 + inches to seat your,reel to your satisfaction.I bought mine about 20 years ago.It has held up fine,but it ain;t built for dragging a big cat out of a logjam.I have a Eagle Claw 6ft.6in. Orzark Snaggler by Wright & McGill Co.Rated for 40-80 lb.line.The reel on it is a Mitchell Riptide 4/0 .GL,spooled with 60 lb.mono.I do not believe this rig is stout enough to haul the biggest cats out of the Savannah river,and the Santee.Since 1950,I have seen the stumps,logs and jams at the lowest water.This rig will handle bigger fish than I am able to handle,so I don;t need stouter gear.I once was spooled with 80 lb.mono. on a Penn Senator,with my drag set at 20 lb. on a scale.This was 20 years ago,tidewater,on the Savannah river.I never turned it,but it swam back and forth across the river,so it was not a log,and too fast for a Manitee.No leader,so a Bull shark should have cut the line.You never know when you will come up shy.peewee-willians
     
  19. Catman 1964

    Catman 1964 New Member

    Messages:
    130
    State:
    New Mexico
    Here is an illustration if you use a 4 foot pole as a lever to move something and then a 10 foot lever what takes less effort. A 10' foot plus rod is not needed for boat fishing but for shore anglers a longer rod not only gets you more casting distance, but you can also apply more force with less effort on your part. But the main thing is whatever works for you. Take care and God Bless.
     
  20. ears

    ears New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    *Required*
    Shorter rods give more leverage. Stand up rods offshore are about 5' no longer you would never get a big tuna in on a long rod. The butt of the rod is the pivot point the more length past that the more leverage the fish has.