Lock and Dam Fishing

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Night_Elf45, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. Night_Elf45

    Night_Elf45 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    State:
    Mississippi
    Every other month or so, I take a trip to the local lock and dam to try out my luck for some cats. I still have yet to catch anything. There are usually a few people out there that catch some cats up to around 20 pounds from what I've seen. They all claim to have caught much larger fish when using their larger rod setups. Is there anything special that you can do to increase the chances of catching anything? The water is thought to be around 30-40 feet deep in the middle.
     
  2. ShipwreckDiver

    ShipwreckDiver New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Michigan
    A HUGE problem with fishing dams is that they are 99% of the time HIGHLY overfished. If you could find a spot below the dam somewhere you will have great luck. I actually fish about 400-500 yards above a dam on my river and slay big channels on a nightly basis, whereas at the dam there are 5-10 guys fishing all day and into the night and they may muster up a very small cat, a few carp, and an occassional rock bass between all of them together. Bottom line, if you're having horrible luck on a place like the bottom of the dam which is supposed to be the best fishing, it's overfished and pressure is high routinely. That's my own two cents anyways, but good luck and post again if your luck changes.
     

  3. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    If the fish are over pressured, try using a bait that no one else has used before.
     
  4. Night_Elf45

    Night_Elf45 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    State:
    Mississippi
    all right, thanks a lot. tomorrow morning i'm going to give it another go with a couple friends. if we're not getting any luck, i'll go give the top of the dam a try for a bit.
     
  5. s_man

    s_man New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    south east ohio
    You didn't say what baits you are using so I'll tell ya to try live and cut bait if you haven't used it yet. The larger the shad you can get the better a live bait it will be. 12 to 15 inches is no problem for a 20lb flat to eat. Plus they are hardier than 5 or 8 inchers in current. Hook them in the nose. This way they can stay facing the current, keeps em alive. I assume skipjack would behave the same but I don't have them here so I can't say for sure. Dam fishing on the Muskingum river is always hit or miss, there is no in between. They might be hitting fierce monday then you can't buy a bite the rest of the week. I have yet to discover why they choose certain nights over others but thats why I still go. You need to experiment with distance, rigs, types of baits, location, things like that. If you arent catching fish, cast further out, or farther up or downstream. Look where the guys catching fish are casting, find out what they are doing that you aren't. The main thing is don't keep doing what doesn't work, keep changing things till you find something that does.
     
  6. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    Chris welcome to the BOC!
     
  7. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,788
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    most people that fish dams use carolina rigs or bank sinkers for weight.these will drift down stream till they find the place where they will hold your bait.ive started doing better on bigger fish sense i started using the weights with the copper wires coming out of the bottom.you just bend the wires into a trebble kook look and cas the same way.your weight will hang up a lot sooner and you are fishing where most arent.when the fish hits he will straiten out the copper wire and you got him.that works for me.
     
  8. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    The areas right below dams & powerhouses definitely get a lot of fishing pressure. But often, the reason is that they produce a lot of fish for the size area fished. What you need to do is watch everybody else and see who's catching fish; then take a closer look at how those people are fishing: their tackle, bait, where they're casting to, etc. In many cases, an extremely long cast is needed to reach the spots where cats are being caught. That requires specialized tackle. If you're fishing from a boat, you're more likely to be able to use your regular catfishing tackle, because you're more likely to be drifting. If you're casting up to the dam/powerhouse, you're usually looking at having to cast the same distance as from shore.
    Of course, any time you can find a honeyhole that doesn't get much pressure, you've found a real gem that can produce better than any well-known hotspot you can think of.