Lock and Dam Augusta

Discussion in 'LOCAL GEORGIA TALK' started by armyfisher, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. armyfisher

    armyfisher Member

    Messages:
    85
    State:
    georgia
    Well to my amazment the fishing down on the lower side of lock and dam wasn't to bad. my buddy and i pulled in 3 channel's all in or around 2-3 lbs. a few small gar and some decent sized eels. The wierdest thing i've ever caught came that night to. now ya'll can laugh if ya want but this thing almost took of one of my fingers. I caught a bowfin and not knowing what it was i thought it was a snakehead damn everything looked right but the coloration. damn fish got the mouth and the attitude of a dang blue fish. now for anyone that had fished up north for stripers ya'll might know this, get ya decent amount of eels and throw um out early morning on striper/flounder rigs and let the magic happen. the other thing i've found a good use for them down here in GA, is channel, gar, and turtle fishing. i'm sure they would work great for flatties using a flounder rig. Another thing if you do fish lock and dam you must know of the bait shop right before you get there. I talked to the lady that normally runs the shop if anyone gets a decent amount of eels she said she would buy um of ya so just a suggestion to make a quick buck, she hasn't determined the price i use to buy um $5-$7 a dozen up in Ct when i was striper fishing.
    If anyone has any info on bowfin's and if the are native or non-native please let me know. Thank you brothers.:big_smile:
     
  2. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    Bowfins, or swamp trout have been around for millions of years. I have heard that they can survive in water that no other fish can live in. We catch them every once in a while over here on the Chattahoochee River.
    Georgia State Record Freshwater Fishes

    Bowfin

    Weight:
    Angler:
    Location:
    Date:
    16 lbs.
    Charles O. Conley
    Stephen Foster State Park
    May 25, 1976
     

  3. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    For the Balao class submarine, see USS Bowfin (SS-287)
    Bowfin[​IMG]
    Scientific classificationKingdom:Animalia
    Phylum:Chordata
    Class:Actinopterygii
    Order:Amiiformes
    Hay, 1929Family:Amiidae
    Bonaparte, 1838Genus:Amia
    Species:A. calva
    Binomial nameAmia calva
    Linnaeus, 1766
    Bowfins are an order (Amiiformes) of primitive ray-finned fish. Only one species, the bowfin Amia calva, family Amiidae, exists today, although additional species in six families are known from Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Eocene fossils. These included the huge Leedsichthys, probably the biggest fish that ever existed. The bowfin and the gar are two of the freshwater fishes still extant that existed, almost unchanged from their current form, while the great dinosaurs roamed the earth.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Calamopleurus cylindricus fossil


    The most distinctive characteristic of the bowfin is its very long dorsal fin consisting of 145 to 250 rays, and running from mid-back to the base of the tail. The caudal fin is a single lobe, though heterocercal[1]. They can grow up to 1 meter in length, and weigh 7 kg. Other noticeable features are the black "eye spot" usually found high on the caudal peduncle, and the presence of a gular plate. The gular plate is a bony plate located on the exterior of the lower jaw, between the two sides of the lower jaw bone.
    Bowfin are not considered a good food fish compared to more popular freshwater gamefish species. They are generally considered "trash" fish by sportsmen, and are scorned for their voracious appetite for more desirable species. They will occasionally strike - and sometimes ruin with their powerful jaws - artificial lures, but they generally strike on live or cut fishes. They also naturally consume copious numbers of live crayfishes in many rivers. When hooked, Bowfin battle powerfully, offering a tremendous fight to the angler. Bowfin should be handled carefully. They are an ill-tempered, pugnacious fish, and consider themselves a match for anything - including a human being. Once in the boat, they will make every attempt they can at biting the fisherman - and they have a mouthful of very sharp teeth.
    Bowfins are found throughout eastern North America, typically in slow-moving backwaters and ox-bow lakes. When the oxygen level is low (as often happens in still waters), the bowfin can rise to the surface and gulp air into its swim bladder, which is lined with blood vessels and can serve as a lung.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Bowfin from the Coosa River near Wetumpka, Alabama(Released)


    The list of local and alternate names the bowfin is known by is lengthy, but common ones include "dogfish", "mudfish", "grindle" (or "grinnel"),cottonfish and "lawyer". In parts of S. Louisiana they are called "tchoupique" or "choupique".
    Bowfin are indiscriminant and voracious predators, known to eat a variety of prey from insects and crawfish to fish and frogs. Compared to many other species of their size, they have a tremendous appetite.
    Males are said to turn "bluish" when breeding [1]. The male bowfin exhibits extensive parental care. He clears an area in the mud for the female to lay eggs in, and then he fertilizes them. He hovers nearby and aggressively protects the eggs and the fry after they emerge.[2]
     
  4. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    Wait! There is more!
    Bowfins: Amiiformes - PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS, GEOGRAPHIC RANGE, HABITAT, DIET, BEHAVIOR AND REPRODUCTION, BOWFINS AND PEOPLE, CONSERVATION STATUS





    BOWFIN (Amia calva): SPECIES ACCOUNT

    PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Bowfins have a long, curved dorsal (DOOR-suhl) fin, the one that runs along the top of the body. These fishes are called living fossils (FAH-suhls) because they have existed in the same form for more than one hundred million years. The skeleton is made up of both bone and cartilage (KAR-teh-lej), or tough, bendable supporting tissue. The tail fin is short and rounded. Bowfins have a large bony plate between their lower jawbones, and bony plates cover the skull.


    GEOGRAPHIC RANGE

    Bowfins live only in eastern North America.


    HABITAT

    Bowfins live in freshwater in lakes and slow-moving rivers that have a large amount of plant life.


    DIET

    Bowfins are predators (PREH-duh-ters) with huge appetites. Predators are animals that hunt and kill other animals for food.


    BEHAVIOR AND REPRODUCTION

    Bowfins are very strong. They can stand high temperatures and breathe air at the surface if necessary. They spawn, or release eggs, the female reproductive cells, in the springtime.

    BOWFINS AND PEOPLE

    Bowfins are not used for food or sport.


    CONSERVATION STATUS

    Bowfins are not threatened or endangered.


    BOWFIN (Amia calva): SPECIES ACCOUNT

    Physical characteristics: The long, curved dorsal fin of a bowfin has forty-two to fifty-three rays, or supporting rods, inside. Bowfins reach a length of about 35 inches (89 centimeters) but are usually shorter. The world-record bowfin weighed almost 22 pounds (10 kilograms), but the usual weight is 2 to 5 pounds (0.9 to 2.5 kilograms). Males are smaller than females. The long, thick body of bowfins is dark olive green on top, lighter on the sides, and cream to greenish yellow on the bottom. The tails of males have a dark spot rimmed in orange. Females also have a dark spot, but it is not rimmed in orange. Other names for bowfins are blackfish, cottonfish, cypress trout, freshwater dogfish, grindle, grinnell, marshfish, mudfish, scaled ling, and speckled cat.
    Because they can breathe surface air, bowfins can live in water too polluted and stagnant for other fishes. (Illustration by Brian Cressman. Reproduced by permission.)
    Geographic range: Bowfins live only in eastern North America. Their range includes the Saint Lawrence River system, which extends from the eastern part of the United States and Canada to the Great Lakes, and the Mississippi River system, which extends from Minnesota to Texas and Florida.


    Habitat: Bowfins live in swampy, sluggish water in warm lakes and rivers that have a great deal of plant life. Because they can breathe surface air, bowfins can live in water too polluted and stagnant, or still and stale, for other fishes.

    Diet: Bowfins are greedy predators. Young bowfins feed on small animals such as insect adults and larvae (LAR-vee), or insects at a young stage of life before becoming adults, and plankton, or microscopic plants and animals drifting in the water. Once bowfins grow to a length more than about 4 inches (10 centimeters), they eat other fishes. Adults also eat crayfish, shrimp, insect adults and larvae, frogs, and plants. Bowfins are sluggish and clumsy and stalk prey, or animals used for food, by scent as much as by sight. Bowfins capture their prey with sudden gulps of water.

    Behavior and reproduction: Bowfins have gills, special organs for obtaining oxygen from water, but they also use their swim bladder, or an internal sac usually used for controlling position in the water, for breathing surface air. Male bowfins move into shallow waters of lakes and rivers to prepare a round nest hidden by plants or under a log. Once a female, and sometimes more than one, is attracted into the nest, she lays as many as sixty-four thousand eggs in four or five batches. The male then fertilizes (FUR-teh-lye-sez) the eggs, or deposits sperm, which unites with the eggs to begin development. The young hatch in eight to ten days and use a sticky organ on the tip of the snout, or nose area, to attach themselves to plants or other objects on the bottom. After seven to nine days, the young form a tight, sphere-shaped school that is guarded by the male for several weeks. After the school breaks up, bowfins move back into deep water.

    Bowfins and people: Bowfins are often considered pest fishes because they compete for food with sport fishes. People seeking other fishes sometimes catch bowfins, but they usually let them go because bowfin does not taste good. Bowfins are important predators in some regions, because they control populations of unwanted fishes and keep populations of game fishes from becoming too large, which would stunt the growth of the individual fishes.

    Conservation status: Bowfins are not threatened or endangered. ∎
     
  5. Fishmaster1203

    Fishmaster1203 New Member

    Messages:
    3,603
    State:
    PA
    Hope that will do ya! :big_smile:
     
  6. armyfisher

    armyfisher Member

    Messages:
    85
    State:
    georgia
    :big_smile:i appreciate it, a lot. that sucker survived for heck almost 5 hours outside of water. we put him in a cooler of water around 2-3 hours and he was swimming around like it was nothing. My buddy said he was gonna go get um mounted, again thank you much happy fishing brother.