Location, Location, Location

Discussion in 'Carp Fishing' started by skeetermagnet, Nov 16, 2006.

  1. skeetermagnet

    skeetermagnet New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Edmond, Oklahoma
    Let me start off by saying that I'm pretty new to carp fishing. I have caught quite a few, but never any on purpose. I'm looking to change that.

    There seems to be quite a bit of information about baits. Actually, an enourmous amount of information about baits. That isn't necessarily a bad thing. I'm keeping track of it all. (Although I do think my wife is tired of hearing about boilies on hair rigs) But my sticking point so far has been not what to fish with, but where to fish.

    So here is my question......and please, more is definitely better when it comes to this kind of information....where in the lake do you look for carp? There has to be some spots that are better than others. I'm sure it matters for the time of year, too. Let's start a location tutorial here for us newbies so we can put some tonnage on the hook-end of the rod.
     
  2. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    I have tried what I have been told and that is look for slow to still waters in a quite part of the lake that has some algea growth. While this is not true on all lakes it is a basic suggestion and a starting point. I am sure some of the Oklahoma guys will help you more as they find the post.
     

  3. zappaf19

    zappaf19 New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Monticello,IN
    We use to carp fish in front of the dam gates. The bait we used was the moss off the gates. We would just put a hunk of moss on and hook and throw it in. You had to be quick because the carp would grab it suck the algie out of it then spit it out. It was a blast.
    Bill
     
  4. CatHound

    CatHound New Member

    Messages:
    164
    State:
    Missouri
    Carp are actually omnivorous - they eat both plant matter and animal (mostly insects, crustations and worms). So, they tend to hang out where those food items are to be found. That being the shallows.

    Primarily, Look for skinny water with vegetation and muddy bottoms. If that is lacking in the body of water you are fishing, look for structure in intermediate depths with access to deeper water. They tend to prefer still waters, but they will hold in eddies next to currents.

    Basically, carp are in almost every body of water in the USA. You should be able to locate them in your favorite one.
     
  5. tomcat85

    tomcat85 New Member

    Messages:
    966
    State:
    uh
    i tried to find some carp before but had no luck maybe this post will help lol. thanks guys.
     
  6. MR SANDMAN 800

    MR SANDMAN 800 New Member

    Messages:
    1,026
    State:
    Kansas
    In the summer and when the water is warmer, I always find them in the shallow flats. You can sometimes see their silouettes in the water if the water is pretty calm and the sunlight is at the right angle. Sight fishing is pretty fun for carp. I don't carp fish in the winter so can't help you much there.
     
  7. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,457
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    If in doubt use the wind. Fish into it, especially if you can find a small bay that the wind has been blowing into for a couple of days. Carp frequently breach and roll so be on the lookout all the time for fish. I have caught many by casting right into an area where I have seen activity. If you fish at night and the lake is a quiet place try a bait really close in, even under the rod top. They will patrol the shoreline looking for food but they spook easily so no noise or lights. If you live close to the lake you can prebait (chum) an area. The fish will soon learn to associate that area with food supply and they will be inclined to check that area out more often...W
     
  8. greg12345

    greg12345 New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    NC
    Shallows or coves near either structure or deep water. It is easier to bring them to you though rather than finding them. Start chumming in the summer and keep chumming the same spot throughout the year, they will stay there even when it gets cold. Or find someplace where people feed ducks bread, then use a breadball - they will be there even in winter.