Livewell plumbing questions...

Discussion in 'Livewell and Bait Tank Review' started by Seth, Jan 15, 2008.

  1. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    Can overflow fittings be ran to exit below the water level without a problem of draining? I know this sounds dumb, but I'm just wanting to 100% on that before I start cutting holes and plumbing my boat.

    Also, if I have a livewell in the front of the boat, will it hurt anything to have the hose run all the way to back to the transom? I'm wanting to have a drain hose, overflow hose, and then a pump through the transom that pumps water up a hose into the livewell.

    My boat is 16' long if that helps any. The livewell will probably be 12-13' from the transom.

    Does anybody have any examples for plumbing for a livewell in the front of a boat?

    Thanks to all who answer my "simple simon" questions.:wink:

    Seth
     
  2. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Seth, my boat's set up similar to what you describe, except my bait well was removable. Below is a link to where I've tried to explain it:
    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?p=868233#post868233

    But to answer some of your questions - yes, you can drain your well to the back of the boat - I drain my baitwell back through the same pump I use to fill it and it goes through the transom below the water line. You probably alread know this, but you can drain out to an opening below the water line IF you're running your hose down to the water. If it's level or sloped from the water towards your well, the water will come in.

    A simple way to do it would be to put your fill pump in the transom and run your hose up to the well. You can then run your overflow back to the transom and out. Or you can just punch a hole in the side of the boat (above the water line would probably work since your putting it in the front and if it's a jon the bow is out of the water higher than the stern) lower than the overflow exit on the well and run your pipe/hose between the openings.

    If you do run hose from the back to the front, I would make it one piece - less joints mean less places to leak and use a decent hose. If it's going to be exposed to the sun, get a material that is UV resistant if at all possible.

    I'm not a plumbing expert by any means, but I've done a lot of work to my boat and she's still floating:wink: Somebody better at it than me will probably give you some good ideas here in a minute. Good Luck~

    Branden
     

  3. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    Thanks Branden,

    I didn't even think about just running the overflow to the side of the boat. It will be above the water line then too.

    Do I need to use a bigger pump through the transom to have enough pressure to pump water up the hose to the front of the boat or does hose length not matter for this?
     
  4. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    Personally, I hate to put holes in a hull if it is at all avoidable (I even glued a board to the transom and screwed the transducer and livewell supply pump to the board so there are no screw holes in the hull).

    Anyway, for a simple and easily removable livewell, I have a small bilge pump attached to the transom below the water line. The hose runs up over the transom and runs along the gunwhale to the livewell. The drain (make sure it's at least twice the diameter as the fill hose) simply runs from the livewell over the side. Not as pretty and elegant as some, but it works - no holes in the boat, and I can remove the livewell any time I want.
     
  5. zappaf19

    zappaf19 New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Monticello,IN
    Keep in mind that if you put it below the water line the well might empty when going down the lake @ hi speed. I had this problem and put in a plastic gate valve to close when traveling down the lake.
    Bill
     
  6. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    If you plumb below the water line make sure it goes out the transom.
    Anything on the side or the bottom of the boat could fill the livewell while underway.
    It would act just like a sea chest.


    Not a thing wrong with putting holes in boats as long as you know how to put holes in boats.
    If you have a tendency to be a "cobbler" I wouldnt advise it for the life of the boat.
    If you are attentive, dont whine about spending a dollar, or having to go in search for that one that one ingredient that may be required and will not substitute it, I say you are capable of putting the right hole in a hull and not have any problems now or later.
    Its not rocket science but their is the right way and the wrong way.
     
  7. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Seth, I just use a regular livewell pump I got at Cabela's. It's basically just a 300 or 500 gph bilge pump with the fittings to go through the transom and take the hose to your well. My well is probably 10 - 12 feet from the pump and I haven't had any issues with it pushing the water to the well. You'll find once you get done with this project that working on and modifying your boat gets to be hobby that can take up almost as much time (and a lot more money) than actually fishing:smile2: I have as much fun this time of year fooling with my rig than I ever did winter fishing. Good luck!

    Branden
     
  8. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    Does anybody have use a flow-rite livewell system? I have been checking in to them and system #3 looks like what I need. It doesn't look very complicated either.

    I can pump in fresh water constantly, recirculate the water when on plane or out of the water, and drain the tank while in or out of the water.

    What do you guys think? Anybody have experience with these systems or have a better idea?

    Thanks,
    Seth
     
  9. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    You can pump water at 70MPH with the use of a sea chest so you dont have to be limited when your boat is underway.

    Other then that, I wouldnt use plastic or nylon fittings and when the fitting came through the hull I'd put a ball valve then attach the hose to the ball valve.
    Reason being nylon and plastic get brittle and crack with heat cold cycling.
    They crack, you sink.

    By placing a ball valve on the through hull if your hose cracks, splits, or comes lose, all you have to do is shut off a ball valve to stem the flow of water into your hull until you can repair it then or later.

    Aluminum boat owners may have a little more diffcicult time finding something compatible to use with aluminum.
    I've never been a fan of aluminum. This is one of the reasons. Limitations.
    Its kinda like "owning sort of a boat" instead of "owning a boat."
    There is alot of neat useful stuff made for boats but aren't compatible with aluminum boats.:sad2:
     
  10. Wiskerstickerr

    Wiskerstickerr New Member

    Messages:
    67
    State:
    North Caro
    You could patch into the existing plumbing in the boat if it already has a livewell/baitwell. That is what I did in my River Cat. I installed another 75 gal livewell in front of my center console and have now patched into the existing aerator pump for fill and the drain hose for drain and overflow. I used 2 1100 gph bilge pumps mounted inside the livewell for recirc. I also figured out how to inject air into the pumps to microbubble aerate my new livewell. I have no problems with patching into the existing lines and I have a 500 gph pump supplying water to 3 separate livewells from the stern.
     
  11. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    I had a quality conversation with Roger Miller from Flow-Rite Controls today. Very helpful, patient, and knowledgeable person. I just wish i would have found them before I ran several tanks of fuel out trying to round up all my plumbing needs. They could do the live well plumbing from A-Z and the prices in some cases are better than what I paid for similar items. Spending some time on there site using the Livewell builders guide helped me out greatly. I will be ordering some of there products, just need to make sure on length of cables and where to mount the valves and actuators. If it wasn't for already having several hundred dollars in plumbing parts and hose I would have them do the entire plumbing job.:sad2:
    I know the next time if there ever is a new time.:smile2:
    I would highly recommend anyone needing to do any plumbing on a boat look at the Flow-Rite web site and give them a call.

    Thanks
    David
    Attached is an example of what I am looking at for my large tank.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Dave, great info! I do a lot of pneumatics at work and was wondering where I could get electric valves/solenoids for the boat like we use in our air systems for the boat a reasonable prices. Dunno that I'll need them right now, but there's always next winter's project to think about:wink: Thanks!!

    Branden
     
  13. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    Brandon,
    Here are three of the components to the system that make the valve work. They are cable driven valves like used in a lot a bass boats. I have seen something like them in a friend of mines new Ranger and I looked at a Nitro last night at Bass Pro that had something like this in it.
    Looks like some quality items that would allow for a lot of options we normally would not have with out live wells.
    Seth was the one who found them and passed on the info in this thread. I just made a phone call and played around on there web site for a few hours. Thanks Seth.

    Thanks
    David
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    No Problem. I wish I could have let you know sooner before you spent the money on the other stuff though.

    Now that you guys have been talking about not having a big livewell, I'm think I might not mess with one in my boat either. I doubt I will keep any big catfish anyways, and the ones I do keep will fit in a 120qt cooler livewell if need be.

    With my boat being a 1648 with a 50hp Yamaha jet drive, it would be best to keep it as light as possible anyway. The front and back decks that were built on my boat are pretty heavy I am sure. Having 3 batteries in the boat doesn't make it any lighter either. :sad2:
     
  15. scoremaster

    scoremaster New Member

    Messages:
    29
    State:
    western maryland
    i have a 14 ft v bottom that i got last fall first boat for me and family not big enough but cheap enough to know if the family liked it .
    they do so i have made a few changes to the boat .

    it is a sea nymph alumminumand was set up as a small speed boat when i got it complete with streering wheel cables and all alumm. front on top .
    i removed the alumm. top built some decks and installed seats (2) where i thought they should be but aftere a summer of fishing have removed all and changed some things around .
    like i removed the front seat and lowered it down to a factory bench seat and moved the back seat to the right to be able to control thr tiller motor better than trying to break my arm reaching around .

    and i installed a live well i built my self thinking it might work i built it out of 3/4 pine and coated with 100% silicone it is 4.5 ft wide 12 inchs deep 12 inches thick. it has 3 doors on top the outside ones are screened off to put in either ice, pop, beer or bait and the center section is 2.5 feet not the largest live well but should serve it's purpose anything to big to be put in the well will be hit with a hammer and throwed on thre floor :smile2:
    i installed a pump from the rollors where i work ( blacktop) and a 1/2 in.filling tube with holes drilled in it to provide water and air to fish in tank and filling it. 9i just trhrow the hose over the side to do the filling and also have a drain installed on the bottom connected to a hose that can drain it after a day of fishing or can drain into a bucket and drain if i have to .

    sorry for the long post but been awhile since i been on and :wink:


    thanks,
    Scott