Little Rivers Or Big Rivers!!!

Discussion in 'Flathead Catfish' started by catfishrollo, Oct 23, 2009.

  1. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    We all live close and fish a local system mostly . Some may live on a big river system, some on a smaller to little river system. Do big river fishermen depend on elecronics more than the smaller river fisherman? Most likely! Do little river fishermen pay attention to banks and small detail more than the big river guys? Possibly! Whats your input in the difference between the two when pursuing flatheads. I know there is because I grew up catching them on small rivers here, and have been targeting bigger waters the last few years with success and failure! I will chime back in to talk about the things I am learning. Speak out on behalf of both so we can all help one another!..... rollo
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2009
  2. xnmcclurex

    xnmcclurex Active Member

    Messages:
    584
    State:
    Pittsburgh Pa
    i fish smaller rivers so that i can focuse on smaller areas and its easier to find fish. i live right next to the ohio but ive never caught a fish out of it, instead i go up a small river that leads into the ohio and catch fish all the time. i still use my fish finder to find the depth though...
     

  3. Flootie16

    Flootie16 New Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    State:
    Indiana
    I fish the ohio down below cincinnati. And I do rely a lot on my depth finder. Not to just find fish but to find holes and water depths. And i do catch plenty of fish. I also have fished small rivers and you can normally tell by looking at the contours of the bank where the deeper water would be. but i find that a fish finder is just as equally important in a small river as well. As for finding the fish. thats just a game all in its own. I think in a smaller river you have a better idea what to look for and where to find them. where as the big river there is so much more water and so many more options for a fish to choose from.
     
  4. JEFFRODAMIS

    JEFFRODAMIS New Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    State:
    TEXAS
    i agree with yall..smaller systems are much easier to fish and have a higher "handicap" for bait placement
     
  5. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    i actually have a lot better luck on the bigger river of the two i normally fish,but i think the reason may be the smaller one has a lot more pressure on it .so theres less fish.and i use my depth finder the same in either one to look for depth and temp.
     
  6. USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT

    USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT New Member

    Messages:
    3,020
    I fish from the bank,so there aint a lot of electronics involved.I fish big rivers more often than small.I like them both at times.Sometimes it,s easier to find the fish in the smaller rivers,the smaller rivers are definitely more pressured though.The big rivers take a little longer to find out where they,re at sometimes,but it seems like when you do find them,they stay in one area longer.I try and pay attention to the little details in big or small.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2009
  7. Colsrob

    Colsrob Active Member

    Messages:
    862
    State:
    Ohio, Columbus
    I basically have the same habits, no matter the size of the river. It's just something I can't help.

    I use the finder in the same ways, watch for shoreline changes, and always keep an eye out for just the right structure.
     
  8. luckey wade

    luckey wade New Member

    Messages:
    754
    State:
    ohio
    I fish a small river am dont try very hard now a days .But when started use depth finder Ive been wanting to bye one for 2000$ but dont know if it would pay off.Ive not fished the bigger enough .But a friend fish a big tourament an the winner said couldnt did it with out the fish finder.
     
  9. USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT

    USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT New Member

    Messages:
    3,020
    Give me 2 grand and I.ll be in a boat next year!LOL:wink:
     
  10. drpepper

    drpepper New Member

    Messages:
    6,133
    State:
    Indiana
    I primarily fish a small/medium river. I use a depth finder not a fish finder.
    I've seen guys let a "fish finder" become a handicap in every size river.
    I look for structure with my eyes more than with a sonar on my river.
    an important learned skill that I've noticed completely lacking in some of the big river guys...
     
  11. jrgriffhusker

    jrgriffhusker New Member

    Messages:
    722
    State:
    Minden, Nebrask
    I've fished small rivers all my life. Small enough that I can check depth with a paddle or stick. Lots of trees, logjams and turn and changes in depth. I concentrate on the shore lines and stick to the logjams. Very rarely have I caught a fish in the middle or even 12 foot off the shoreline. Hopes this helps you guys.
     
  12. Colsrob

    Colsrob Active Member

    Messages:
    862
    State:
    Ohio, Columbus
    Exactly. I use the finder for depth, bottom structure, and possible fish holding. But that usually means nothing to me if the upper visual area is not something that I want. The right depth and a log pile mean a lot more to me.

    Hell, I mainly use the fish finder to try and keep from busting props. I even seem to suck at that...at least this season I sure did.:big_smile:

    Muskingum River -3
    Rob's Props -0
     
  13. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    Thats why most of us here are running jets now!:wink: rollo
     
  14. Blacky

    Blacky New Member

    Messages:
    10,351
    State:
    Philadelphia, P

    I live 10 minutes away from both a little river (Schuylkill) and big river (Delaware). I prefer to fish the smaller river.

    Why? Trying to locate fish in a big river is like finding a needle in a haystack. In little rivers, fish are easier to locate.

    Plus fishing big river requires a boat.

    I'll stick to my small river the beloved Schuylkill!:cool2:
     
  15. readingcatfisher

    readingcatfisher New Member

    Messages:
    3,748
    State:
    Berks coun
    I fish the Skuke too out of a boat or off the banks in a boat its mostly electronics for depth and temps and target structure,off the banks its just fire your bait and wait:smile2:
     
  16. playin4funami

    playin4funami New Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    State:
    Saronville Ne.
    I too grew up fishing rivers I can dang near jump across,and some that I can wade across and not even get my knees wet. They are(imho) easy to fish,look for outside bends,and brushpiles,and any other structure. I like to fish the brushpiles during the day with leopard frogs,just toss it on a slip sinker rig and toss infront of a logpile,they let the current take the bait right into the edge of the pile,hang on tight,and getem' out of the wood before they can get tangled. mostly channels but once in a while a surprize flattie. My location probably prevents my fishing the bigger rivers more than anything,just because there are none close.
     
  17. Colsrob

    Colsrob Active Member

    Messages:
    862
    State:
    Ohio, Columbus
    Oh, I agree. I would love to have a jet. Unfortunately, for now at least, my boat has a 135 i/o, and it would be very expensive, if not difficult, to change over to a jet.

    However, I am looking for a new(new to me at least) boat this "offseason". I want something a bit smaller and capable of being run in shallower waters. Mainly the Scioto in the southern Franklin Co. area.

    It sounds easy to do, but I am also trying to stay within a very cheap budget.:big_smile:

    Somewhere down the road I may try to sell my boat and pick up another of similar size, but better suited for the fishing I do. I originally bought my boat new in 1992. It's an open bow runabout, not a fishing vessel. It does work quite well for bottom fishing though...and that is not by accident.

    A 16ft or so, aluminum w/ console, deep Vee, and at least 90hp motor would be on my wish list. But, I do not plan on breaking the bank for it. As much as I would love something better suited, I have no interest in spending a lot for it.

    I do have a question though, for those that have outboard motors, jet or not: Why would you want trim and tilt, if part of the benefit of having an outboard is for being better in shallow water? Aside from having a second motor for possible shallow areas, I think trim and tilt would defeat some of the benefit. I know when I find rocks or debris it's usually too late to do anything about it, and I lose another prop.
     
  18. drpepper

    drpepper New Member

    Messages:
    6,133
    State:
    Indiana
    T & T for planing and shallows
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2009
  19. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    I didn't put trim and tilt on my 1756 G3. Still don't need it! Yes, you will gain alittle on both ends, but not worth the money once on plane in my opinion. I can run anywhere the entire season without it in some of the shallowest waters one would want to run at night time!!! rollo
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  20. lendog

    lendog New Member

    Messages:
    2,141
    State:
    berks, PA
    i fish small rivers and find it much easier to locate fish, only bad thing about the small river is its also very shallow in alot of areas which limits areas to fish or areas you can get into with a boat, i have a jet and don't worry as much about shallow water but i'm still running in water under a foot deep. and to answer the benifits of have trim on a boat if for several reasons
    i use my trim to jump up on plane faster and adjust the trim once on plane to gain the most speed, also comes in handy to get the motor out while in shallow water(on proped boats) so ya don't hit your skeg. i have electric trim on my jet which comes in handy after i suck a bunch of crap into the intake and need to clean it out:wink: