Line test?

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by center12, Jun 20, 2006.

  1. center12

    center12 New Member

    Messages:
    1,444
    State:
    KS
    So I'm out in the back yard doing nothing and figure I might as well do a little line test. I grab the nine year old and give him my dial hand scale, to this I tie my fishing line and proceed to try and "land" my 70 pound fish(while he reads the scale). Let me tell ya about my kid catching set-up.........medium action UglyStik Tiger rod, Penn 320LD and 80# PowerPro, serious kid catching tackle:big_smile:

    Boy's got the scale in hand and is making a run(walk), man is the rod bowing and the drag is slipping.........I got a good kid on this time!! I have the boy get a scale reading while he is still moving.........ready..........12 pounds:embarrassed: . This ain't cutting it, I can't turn the kid so I slide the lever drag all the way forward and put my thumb on the spool. The kid is still taking line and it all I can do to hold the rod, I figure something is going to give...........wrong..........16 pounds!! I couldn't stop the kid:sad2:

    Next I tied the scale to a tree and gave it everything my drag would take, I'm happy to report I made it to 17 pounds.

    Why are we using 80 and 100 pound test when there isn't a snowballs chance in Hades we'll ever hook a fish that will pull that hard? Think I'm going back to 30# mono on my flathead rigs. Did I miss something in my test? The Kid is ready for another round if need be.
     
  2. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    thats cute I hope you CPR'd the kid back into the wild.
     

  3. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    you also have to account for line stretch and if the line is worn or not... if you have worn 80# test on, you can land a 20#'er easy... but if you got worn 20# test on, its going to be tricky to land that same fish, and your lucky if your line doesn't snap.... lol... but with the drag hittin at 17#'s you could have up to 25 or 30 #'s pullin the line and bendin your rod, and with it being a long rod you also have leverage.... the best to do is pull the line with the tip of the rod pointing at the scale... that will give you the most accurate drag test, then test it again with bending the pole as if you were fighting a fish, there should be a good bit of difference on the scale.
     
  4. teaysvalleyguy

    teaysvalleyguy New Member

    Messages:
    9,751
    State:
    GC, OHIO
    Reason for bigger line is rocks/trees/anything that can cause extra stress on the line. If it was not for those things then 20# would be enough with drag to bring in any fish.
     
  5. center12

    center12 New Member

    Messages:
    1,444
    State:
    KS
    Kennith, I'll test that tomorrow, but I can't imagine that 16 pounds slipping my drag will be any different whether the pole is bent or not. I also question whether a 20# fish can produce 20# of force in it's watery world, after what I felt I doubt a 50# fish could produce 20# of force in still water.

    The Kid spooled me, never got it to the camera:big_smile:
     
  6. photocat

    photocat New Member

    Messages:
    803
    State:
    HOCO, Maryland
    Thats why i don't use much larger then 15 on anything but my tourny reels where i use 25 all BBG on there... i personally think the only time you'd really need anything over 20 or 25 is fishing in EXTREME cover where you need to get the fish out and to the surface FAST...

    The rod lessens the stress on the line... had you just taken your reel and hand held it and had your kid go and pull or tie to the tree again and pulled the result would have been much higher... go try and see for your self... you'll get something around 25 or 30lbs maybe a little more(not really familiar with the reel your using)of force if you tighten the drag all the way down and hold your finger on the spool...

    And the comment about line stretch... thats why power pro (which is what he was using) is so good... there is none... its thin rope basically, just a bit stronger... little nicks and cuts will weaken the line too (esp on some of those fusion or braided lines) but not enough that if you set your drag correctly for the rod and the reel that it will break... i catch 5lb+ fish on 4 lb line all the time in and around cover (btw its not the easy fish to pull in, ba$$ its actually really fun reel burning channels)...
     
  7. blackhorse83

    blackhorse83 New Member

    Messages:
    1,008
    State:
    missouri
    I believe if it was me, I'd throw ther kid back and try for a flathead instead.
     
  8. GaryF

    GaryF New Member

    Messages:
    3,649
    State:
    O.P., KS
    Charlie

    It's really about abrasion resistance, knot strength, and line damage + defects. I use mostly 100lb Powerpro , but by the time you take everything into account, I'd rate it similar in performance to the thicker 30lb mono I've been using on my 3rd reel. I like the zero stretch factor of the braids, but a good 30-40lb mono will also land any fish that swims in these parts.
     
  9. RPnKC

    RPnKC New Member

    Messages:
    399
    State:
    Kansas

    I am a pretty good gaff-man if you can get 'em in a little closer. :lol: LOL
    In Japan, where bass fishing is at an entirely different level than the US, their top-end non-exported factory-custom reels boast about anything over 6lb of drag, a $500 reel will buy you a whopping 9lbs of drag.
    This is pure mechanical artwork:
    http://www.japantackle.com/Daiwa_reels/Daiwa_Millionaire_Light.htm
    Yes your reading should be higher with a bent rod.
    These reels are capable of landing that make our cats look like guppies in a fishbowl.http://fish.shimano.com/catalog/fis...<>ast_id=1408474395181270&bmUID=1150858484008
    The IGFA world record for black marlin, set in 1954, is 1,525lbs on 130lb test. I have a funny feeling their tackle wasn't as good back then as it is today.
    Can't say much about the force a fish exerts during the battle, I was too busy with Organic Chemistry when I should have been studying physics.
     
  10. center12

    center12 New Member

    Messages:
    1,444
    State:
    KS
    So I guess the best way to stop a big fish is to point the rod tip straight at it. There's no way I could exert 80 pound of pressure on the fish with my rod tip up, maybe some physics person could come up with how many pounds of energy would be needed at my hands to produce 80# of weigth at the other end. Fish runs for cover, you drop the tip, crank down the drag, thumb lock the spool and have your butt tied to a tree:lol:

    Gary, I too hate the stretch of mono. Have a heck of a time breaking off 20# test in the boat, run out of boat to pull from. As I get older though, Solar green is looking real good(especially under the blacklight).:sad2:
     
  11. RPnKC

    RPnKC New Member

    Messages:
    399
    State:
    Kansas
    Look at the drag ratings for the Shimanos(link in previous post) used to land 1,000lb+ fish.
    Key difference, nothing between them and the fish except clear blue water.
     
  12. center12

    center12 New Member

    Messages:
    1,444
    State:
    KS
    Rick, gaff..........sorta funny in a sick kind of way:eek:oooh:
     
  13. center12

    center12 New Member

    Messages:
    1,444
    State:
    KS
    Heck I don't feel to bad with my drag numbers considering it's a 130$ reel.
     
  14. catfishcentral

    catfishcentral New Member

    Messages:
    1,497
    State:
    OK
    During the annual spoonbill run in the spring most of my rigs are 20 lb test and we catch a lot of 50 pound fish in heavy current 20,000 + cfs. The main reason I use only 20 pound test is for longer casting distance. I do break off from time to time but it's usually after too many nicks on the line from all the rocks. I think if a person pays attention to thier line 20 pound is plenty in most cases. I did use one rig for the first time this year with braid and like the better hook setting with the zero stretch. When your trying to set a hook that 60 to 70 yards out the braid really works it's magic. I can't imagine using less than 65 pound test on braid since it has such a small diameter and that braid doesn't seem to take the nicks like good ol 20 to 30 pound mono.
     
  15. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,167
    State:
    NC
    "Why are we using 80 and 100 pound test when there isn't a snowballs chance in Hades we'll ever hook a fish that will pull that hard?"

    To make up for poor angling ability.

    Most people want to reel fish in, and when it comes to fighting a fish they usually get in a hurry and screw things up. Lots of folks fail to set their drag properly, and this leads to losing fish on lighter line. The bottom line is that it makes up for sloppiness in ability.

    Like many anglers here, I have reeled in fish that were more than twice the test weight of the line. It takes some patience and attention to rod placement.

    I can understand using heavier line due to rocks and trees, but no matter what the test you can not winch a fish around a rock and expect consistent success. For me the cons of heavier line outweigh the pro's.
     
  16. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    nah man... the whole physics thing comes into play with the rod itself, you are going to take pressure off of the reel by using the rod for leverage... think of it as a pry bar so to speak... there is no way you would ge a 300 pound rock to come an inch off of the ground using just your hands... so u put a bar under it and if the bar is long enough when you lift the rod, the rock will come off of the ground... that is also why they make rods flexible, if you were to have a solid rod that didn't bend at all, you wouldn't have as much leverage... the rod it built to take the blunt force from the fish pulling on the line, so it bends more the fish pulls... if you were tryin to fight a fish with the pole pointed straight at the fish, it would be alot harder on your side... so all in all... the longer the rod doesn't just mean that you will be able to cast further, but you will be able to fight in a bigger fish on smaller line... the angle of the rod also matters, but that goes into math, and i don't feel like doing math right now.. lol
     
  17. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    I had 3 fish take me into snags last saturday, and each time they broke off brand new 30-lb berkly biggame..I now know to go with at least 40-lb in extremly snaggy areas.
     
  18. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    Jack,

    Would 50# Big Game be able to be spooled on an Abu 7000? Sort of wished I still had my Abu 10000 :(
     
  19. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    yeah... you can have the best line on the market, but once the fish gets you into cover, you gotta hope your line don't get too torn up in there, otherwise you are going to do an insta-release (fish never leaves water hook still in mouth)... lol
     
  20. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    i'm not sure bout that particular reel... the bigger the line you put on, the less you will be able to have on the spool... and if the line don't break before what the internal components are rated for you could ruin the reel... but thats why reels have drag... lol

    i run 20# cajun line on my med. action open face spinning reel that is rated to hold up to 8# mono and it works just fine... you just have to set the drag right just incase you get yourself a nice big fish.