Line Question

Discussion in 'Fishing Line Review' started by Chrisingeorgia, Apr 15, 2007.

  1. Chrisingeorgia

    Chrisingeorgia New Member

    Messages:
    113
    State:
    NY
    I was watching a Bill Dance episode a couple of weeks ago where he was fishing for really big blues and discussing some new line he was using, but I can't remember what it was called or who makes it. He said it had the breaking strength of 30lb with the diameter of 18lb. Seeing as I only fish with 30lb and up I thought it would be a great way to get a little more yardage on my reels which are pretty small. I'm always worried about hooking into a really nice fish and losing it because I don't have enough line spooled.

    Anyone know what kind of line this is, and who makes it?
     
  2. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    Braided line is a good way to get more line on your reel.
     

  3. Alsey

    Alsey New Member

    Messages:
    772
    State:
    Louisiana
    Most likely braided line he was talking about. I use it on most of my reels. The 30 pound super braid has a diameter equal to 8-10 pound mono. It takes a little while to get used to it. There's absolutely no stretch. It costs quite a bit more than mono but it lasts forever and has no memory.

    As far as getting more spooled up on your reels, I have to put about 100 yds. of 20 lb. mono on my spool before I start spooling up the braided line. Most braids come in 125 to 150 yard spools and with the diameter of a 8 pound mono that will only half fill a good sized reel unless you put some mono under it.
     
  4. Chrisingeorgia

    Chrisingeorgia New Member

    Messages:
    113
    State:
    NY
    I think he said it was made by Berkley... I'm not sure. I went to Berkley's site and they don't give really good descriptions of their line's diameter. I get a little nervous whenever anyone mentions braid line because I've heard so many horror stories about it fraying and becomming a tangled mess, but those could just be rumors. I'm pretty sure it wasn't braid, though. Looked clear like mono.
     
  5. chuck99

    chuck99 New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Georgia
  6. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    There are a few things you need to remember when using braided line. You should put some monofilament on the reel for backing...I think that helps cushion the line so it don't cut itself. You need to have a small broom stick or a stout object to wrap your line around when it becomes necessary to break the line. Some people has bent their spool by pulling directly against the line. Your also gonna leave quite a bit of line in the water when you can't pull hard enough to break it and have to cut it off...I have seen the braided line at tailwaters when the dams have quit releasing water and they go forever... I have spent quite a bit of my time trying to pick up that discarded line. Sometimes a good thing is not the better thing.
     
  7. Chrisingeorgia

    Chrisingeorgia New Member

    Messages:
    113
    State:
    NY
    You're the man, Chuck. PowerPro's exactly what it was. Thanks for the help, and what do you mean "quirks"? I don't like surprises. :big_smile:
     
  8. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    I use power pro on most of my reels and like it, you just need to use mono leaders which are more abrasive resistant if you're fishing around rocks or sharp objects.
     
  9. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Braid is expensive and difficult to use. Nearly impossible to break when it gets snagged. Will slice you wide open if you try to wrap it around your hand to pull it loose. You'll almost never recover from a bird's nest without losing quite a bit of line.

    Did I mention that it's incredibly expensive and difficult to use?

    Stick with mono. You'll be happier.

    If a time arises in the future when you know *why* you want to use braid (and the answer isn't "because I saw Bill Dance use it on TV"), then it might be worth your time and effort. But if you don't know why you need it, you don't need it.
     
  10. chuck99

    chuck99 New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Georgia
    I would try it on just 1 reel first. There seems to be two type of users for Power Pro, those that like it and those that hate it. I would recommend using a mono leader (if your braid is 30 LB, use a 20 LB leader). If you get hung up, the leader should break first, AwShucks pointed out the line left on snags. For my catfish reels, I use 50# with a 40# mono leader.

    I always put the Power Pro on first direcly on the reel using tape. When the Power Pro spool is empty, tie mono on the to end and contine to fill the reel. Whe the reel is full, cut the mono and tape it to another empty spool large enough to hold the Power Pro and mono. Us a bolt with washers, nut to chuck the empty spool to a drill. Ensure the drill is going the correct direction and start pulling line from the reel. When the reel spool is empty, do the same thing again this time, using another empty spool. When you are done, the mono should be on the outside of the spool. Now, tie the mono to the reel spool and start cranking the reel. You should end up with you reel spool full. I made a "spooling station" somewhat like the one Berkley sells.

    This is from their web site.

    Spooling Up

    Unlike monofilament, PowerPro will not stretch on the reel and cling to the barrel. This can result in line sliding around the barrel, which can seem like a problem with your drag mechanism. Rest assured, your equipment is fine. To avoid slippage, attach PowerPro to your spool using one of these methods:
    If your reel has a hole or knob on the barrel, use it.
    1. Leave at least 5 to 10 yards of monofilament on the reel (enough to cover the bottom of the spool) before attaching PowerPro with a Uni to Uni splice.
    2. Put a piece of compressible tape on the barrel before attaching PowerPro.
    Setting the Hook
    Anglers on Saturday morning TV shows often set the hook in bass like Samurai warriors beheading the enemy. This may be a fine technique with monofilament line, but PowerPro doesn't require such a violent motion. When you get a strike, relax; a gentle snap of your wrist will set the hook. Because PowerPro doesn't stretch like nylon lines, you won't get that rubber-band effect. Every inch you move your rod tip equals an inch of movement at the lure.

    Setting your Drag

    PowerPro lines are so small for their strength that you may be tempted to set your drag higher than normal, but remember, your rod or reel may not be designed to handle the same unbelievable loads as your line. To make full use of PowerPro's amazing sensitivity without risking damage to your equipment, try one of the following tips:
    1. Set your drag to match the weakest component in your tackle system.
    2. Set your drag to match the size of mono line you would normally use.
    3. When using ultralight equipment or line (10- or 20-lb. test) set your drag to no more than 1/3 of the line's rated strength. You can check the drag with a fish scale.
    At lower drag settings, a little extra line may pay out at the hookset, compensating for PowerPro's lack of stretch.

    Cutting PowerPro
    PowerPro is extremely strong, and nail clippers won't cut it. We recommend sharp scissors such as FiskarsĀ® for kids, which are inexpensive, easy to find, and have blunt ends to protect your pockets.

    Coloring PowerPro
    Spectra Fiber is an especially dense material that cannot be permanently dyed. The color simply encapsulates the line and will wear away with time. This is normal and does not affect the strength or performance of the line. To re-color your PowerPro line, simply use a permanent magic marker in whatever shade you prefer.

    Retie your Line
    Although PowerPro is extremely strong, it isn't indestructible. If the line starts to look frayed, especially after fishing around structure, it's probably time to cut off the worn section and retie. This way your line will always perform at rated strength.

    Repack your Line
    If your line starts to feel soft or mushy on the reel, especially when fishing with light baits, you should repack your reel. Make an extra long cast or let the line out behind your boat, then reel it in while holding the line taut with your fingers. This will improve casting performance and keep the line from "digging in" after a solid strike.

    Using a Monofilament Leader

    Attaching a monofilament leader to your PowerPro line may prove useful in the following situations:
    1. When bait or jig fishing requires extra finesse, especially in clear water, use a 3-foot monofilament leader to cut down on line visibility.
    2. When fishing for species that strike hard and fast, use a monofilament shock tippet. For close-in situations such as bait fishing, try a 3- to 10-foot tippet. For big game applications, you may want to use up to 100 yards or more.
    CAUTION:
    PowerPro is remarkably thin and strong. To avoid injury, never wrap it around your fingers or hands. If you need to break off the line, wrap it around a solid object and pull.
     
  11. Chrisingeorgia

    Chrisingeorgia New Member

    Messages:
    113
    State:
    NY

    I'm not interested in it because Bill Dance uses it. I needed a much smaller diameter line with a higher breaking strength so I could load more on my reels that are too small to handle regular 30lb mono. It just seemed like the perfect solution to me.
     
  12. Chrisingeorgia

    Chrisingeorgia New Member

    Messages:
    113
    State:
    NY
    Thanks for all the info, Chuck. Hopefully I'm one of those guys that likes it and I'm not throwing money down the drain. Either way I'll use it during my next fishing trip and see how It works for me.
     
  13. Alsey

    Alsey New Member

    Messages:
    772
    State:
    Louisiana
    One last pointer with regard to braid. Before you get to fishing, cast out your line about 100 feet, get it wet, and then reel it back onto the spool. Damp braided line casts better.

    I'm one of those people who won't use anything but power pro or spider wire braid.
     
  14. DemolitionMan

    DemolitionMan New Member

    Messages:
    442
    State:
    Tupelo, Mississippi
    Mr T's got the right answer....I think Bill Dance advertizes for "Stren"...DemoMan
     
  15. photocat

    photocat New Member

    Messages:
    803
    State:
    HOCO, Maryland
    It isn't Power Pro that he was talking about... His sponser is Stren, now a Pure Fishing affiliate w/ its main competitor Berkley, and it would have been Stren Superbraid...

    As far as braids are conserned, its a toss up to me whether they are worth it or not to use... I mean strength to diameter is good, and being able to fill more on the reel is always good, but at what cost? Braid costs somewhere between 4 and 10 times as much as mono, it is also harder to untangle from birdsnests (as demonstrated by my fishing partner in the tournaments last year having to cut the knots out of the line multiple times during each tournament), the knot slippage is also a bit of a problem and if you get the slightest fray of the line in braid, the line loses it seems 75%-85% of its strength a that point, causeing you to possibly lose fish. Also the lack of stretch, stresses the rod more then it would w/ mono and can also do damage to rod eyes...