Lights that wont bring in bugs

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by ArmyCatfish, Jan 27, 2008.

  1. ArmyCatfish

    ArmyCatfish New Member

    Messages:
    210
    State:
    Georgia
    When it comes to night fishing most have experienced the anoyance of bugs being attracted to what ever light source youre using. i started using black light bulbs on my boat. they put off good light but do not attract any bugs. ive also found sometimes the black light attracts small bait fish aswell.
     
  2. catfishscotty

    catfishscotty Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,388
    State:
    mo
    im using a 50 watt 12 volt bulb i can get at wal mart in the R V section. anybody know where i could get a 12 volt black light bulb ?????? any info i would really apreciate. thanks:wink:
     

  3. ArmyCatfish

    ArmyCatfish New Member

    Messages:
    210
    State:
    Georgia
    as far as i found its easiest to order 12volt blacklights. forgive me if im breaking a rule by suggesting this. party websites and automotive website often carry them
     
  4. pinsley

    pinsley New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    VA
    Has anyone tried bright blue LEDs?
     
  5. ArmyCatfish

    ArmyCatfish New Member

    Messages:
    210
    State:
    Georgia
    i dont know myself and ARMYCATS were talkin bout that tonight
     
  6. curdog

    curdog New Member

    Messages:
    896
    State:
    Sheridan, Arkansas
    Try looking in the BOC library you may find just the light your looking for in there.
     
  7. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    I did some looking around online this evening because I'm putting some LED lighting in my boat. From what I could find red is the least interesting to bugs, blue the most. Couldn't find much info on green. Oddly enough in the results of experiements I could find, black light attracted them the most.

    Not disputing what Army is saying necessarily, just wondering if there's a difference in the type of lights he's using vs. the ones in the experiments I was reading. And I don't think the experiments I was reading were exactly done by the Harvard Biology department, either:wink:.

    http://www.cmste.uncc.edu/new/paper...elengths of Light in New River State Park.doc
     
  8. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    I have fished with blacklights on my boats for years. They are not bad to draw bugs. Now if you are on the water during a hatch anything is going to appear to draw bugs. I usually just wait a few minutes after it gets dark and i turn them on. I used the Sloan blacklights for years and just last year switched to LED blacklights. They work great and draw very little power or bugs.:big_smile:

    Here is a picture of the ones i switched to last year. My Sloan's were sacrificed on EBay.:smile2: The LED units are pricey but worth the money to me and how I fish at night.
    I know these were not necessarily what you guys are talking about but i do know that blacklights are not bad to draw bugs. My Sloan's had a second ultraviolet bulb that was white light. Man you knew it if you forgot and turned that stupid thing on, but it did make the line glow even brighter.:eek:oooh:
    Also be aware of looking into any ultraviolet light. it can be very damaging to your eyes. Especially the super bright LED's but any will be harmful to your eyes. Aim them away from you so you don't look into the light.:crazy::eek:oooh::roll_eyes:

    Thanks
    David
     

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  9. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Dave, those are nice. I think I'm going to pick up just the red LED's and set them up in "pods" for deck lights and put some in my storage areas on limit switches so they come on when the hatches are opened. Looking at the costs of just the LEDs and resistors, I should be able to do some really cool stuff with them for minimal cost.

    Again, I've had no experience with blacklights on the water, so the only input I've had is from you guys and what I found on the net. If you guys use them at night, that's good enough for me that they don't draw bugs any more than other colors. But since I use braid the blacklights wouldn't provide me much of an advantage over just red ones. Although if I got a cool velvet Elvis poster that might change :smile2:
     
  10. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    I can see it now. You in a white jump suite, and your Elvis poster just glowing in the blacklight.:smile2::cool2: I'm all shook up!:eek:oooh:

    I see what you are after with the red lights. Doing about the same in the floor of mine and in the compartments. I am even changing out the instrument bulbs (194's) with red led bulbs.:cool2:
    Just FYI on the braid and blacklights. They now offer several braided lines in fluorescent for use with black lights.:big_smile::big_smile_2: Plan on switching over and trying some of them as soon as i use up some of my stockpile of mono.

    Keep an eye out at K-Mart for there LED trailer lights on sale. I haven't looked yet this year but i bought several of the small red ones last year for a trailer and I still have a few left over i was going to put under this console and other places. They are about 1" x 2" in size.
    I use the reasonably priced pocket / cup light fixtures in the main floor and i am changing out the 194 bulbs with red LED bulbs.

    Thanks
    David
     
  11. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    Actually I think research has shown that amber or yellow draw the least bugs.There was a company that made amber globes for Coleman lanterns but I cant recall the name.I do know I used the amber globes and they were fantastic even during hatches.I have gone to the green LEDS and dont have much problem at all.:smile2:
     
  12. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Yeah, like I said, the experiments I was looking at were not the greatest, but I do know from my red-lens headlight that red works well for bug-avoidance and lets me keep my night vision. Blue or green would probably work as well, also. I'll probably use red, though, since a buddy threatened to poke holes in my boat if I used blue because it would "look like one of those stupid Hondas with the neon kit under it" :smile2:
     
  13. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    That is as good of a reason as any to dislike something. Darn things sound like ticked off bumble bee's.:eek:oooh: :smile2:

    Thanks
    David
     
  14. lbaker3

    lbaker3 New Member

    Messages:
    275
    State:
    Topeka, Kansas
    Green Lights -
    I have one of those greens lights that you place just under water beside the boat to attract bait fish. I have used it all of twice. Didn't draw in any bait fish, but I am convinced it drawed in every bug within a 10 mile
    radius. :eek:oooh:
     
  15. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    I have a plan in the works to mount a crapload of those Red LED Trailer Marker lights all around in my boat to light up the floor area of my boat for night-time fishing.

    Picked up a couple last year and did an experiment in my garage with a 1k ohm potentiometer. Yes, my friends, they are dimmable!:big_smile::big_smile::big_smile: COOL!

    All the way from really bright to barely visible with a twist of the knob (they shut down at around 6v I believe) So set them where you want, when you want, or OFF of course. I might do this this winter while I am killing time in Oklahoma! Not exactly cheap to go this route but should be slick and clean when finished with low, low power draw.

    Especially good with kids onboard at night.
     
  16. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    Darryl,

    The LED will have a recommended voltage range and if you exceed or drop below it will shorten the life span of the LED. I hate to be the bearer of bad news but that is the case. Stay int he voltage ratings of the LED and you will be fine. I haven't tried this myself but i did do a lot of research on LED back in the day. When I was messing around with them I found some great reading on line. Low Voltage = short life from what I could find out.:sad2:
    May just take 10% of the life out of the LED but it may be much more loss than that. It is worth a shot but like you are doing i would only try it with some lights i got a good deal on.


    Thanks
    David
     
  17. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Dave, some of the LED suppliers I've looked into also sell controllers for various numbers of LEDs that provide dimming. I'm sick like Darryl, though, and would probably spend the time, money and effort to get an adjustable pot to make my switch out of that I could set to an acceptable voltage range. If it's a couple of hundred thousand hour light, I'll take a 10% loss of lamp life to get a cool effect:smile2: The LED's are relatively cheap if you're willing to do the math and make up your own "pods" with resistors.
     
  18. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    My post may not have came sounded like I intended it to sound.:embarassed:
    I wasn't trying to say not to do it or it was not a good idea. I think it is a great idea. I just would not run the LED's at or near the minimum voltage for long lengths of time. :big_smile:
    I was using LED's for lighting effects when I worked in the Automotive electronics industry. I have been out of the 12 volt industry for a few years now and I am sure things have advanced greatly. I could never get long life out of the LED's when we would drop the voltage on them. Whether it was with a potentiometer or resistors, they would always go out in what seemed like a short period of time.
    Like i said in my previous post.
    i would hate to loose a bunch of $20 plus LED's from BPS.:sad2::smile2::eek:oooh:

    Thanks
    David
     
  19. chsn cat va

    chsn cat va New Member

    Messages:
    1
    State:
    virginia
    Ive used fishing lights of all types /colors.Get the 12v lights at pep boys for automotive cars and put it on a 10 -12 foot pole above your boat.I use green .Any bugs that do get attracted will be way up above your head and dont bother you .The green light seems to work best for me.:crazy:
     
  20. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    I'm not really sure that running an LED at a lower voltage reduces the lifespan but I'll try to see what I can find on it myself. There is a breakdown point of the P-N Junction that shuts down once the bias voltage cannot overcome the semiconductor junction. Either you have overcome that potential or not. On or off, albeit at different conduction intensities, ie resistance of the junction. There could in fact be a bit more heat dissipated at lower levels of conduction due to the resistance of the device. Might make a difference. But the amperage is so small to begin with I don't really know that it would matter much, as the heat load is really, really small.

    Remember, power dissipation equals heat. Power equals Current times Voltage. You are decreasing both the voltage AND the current, therefore less power at the device.

    Thanks for the tip, I'll do some reading myself. Maybe I am screwed up.