Lightning and Being On The Water

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by WylieCat, Jul 23, 2006.

  1. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    First, some facts about lightning deaths:
    1) 85% are male
    2) July is the deadliest month, followed by June and July
    3) 1/2 of all lightning deaths occur after the storm has passed
    4) Florida leads the country in deaths
    5) Lightning is second to floods as the leading weather killer, killing more than tornados, snow storms, and hurricanes

    Just curious as to what everyones tolerance is of lightning when out on the boat or on the bank fishing. Also curious where you head to when you get caught too far from the dock or landing.

    Ask Tatersalad about my tolerance for lightning!!

    Distant flashing is a good warning, but you dont always get it. Last night Tatersalad and I were out with our kids and we saw one flash somewhere off and then we saw bolts! Within minutes there were bolts visible all around and I was heading for the marina. Good thing too, this morning there were trees down on the way to the marina to fish.

    I added a weather radar function to my cell phone this year and it has saved my butt three times already this summer. It is a great way to keep abreast of what is going on when you start to hear that distant rumble or think you see some flashing. Many times the storms are no where near you, but sometimes they are heading right for you. Tatersalad and I were in a tourney Friday night and we saw flashing for a couple of hours that was 70 miles away on radar.

    Remember the 30/30 rule. If there is a flash, and there is less than 30 seconds before the thunder seek shelter, and wait at least 30 minutes after the last lightning before heading back outside
     
  2. dcaruthers

    dcaruthers New Member

    Messages:
    756
    State:
    Alabama
    Dieter,

    Just curious how much you know about the danger of lightning while your on the water in a boat? My brother was in th ecoast guard for 10 years and he has no fear of lightning while in a boat. Me...it scares the hell outta me.
     

  3. dreamer34

    dreamer34 New Member

    Messages:
    849
    State:
    danville virginia
    was bank fishing last night..heard a little thunder but didn't think too much of it...next thing ya know the bottom falls out and there's lightening all around...got back to my house looking like a drowned rat....next time i'll listen to the thunder
     
  4. Georgiajack

    Georgiajack New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Georgia
    No tolerance for lightning here brothers! I have had too many close calls thru the years. I have good friends who had a very close call a few years back. He owns a dairy, and she has been a RN at the hospital for many years. They were fishing around Cumberland Island, and decided to go to the beach for a while. She went for a walk along the beach, a storm blew up, and she took a lightning strike. Burned the shoes to her feet! They thought she was dead for sure, but somehow, by the grace of God, she survived it all, and is back at her job. If you see bad weather coming, don't chance it, head for shelter. Be safe, and not sorry! Good fishin', Jack.
     
  5. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    David, good question.

    I do know that most sea going vessels have an LPS (lighnting protection system) system of some sort in place. This usually consist of some sort of lightning rod that is tied to a discharge plate that runs along the bottom of the boat. Sailboats are the most susceptible to lightning strikes. Large metal ships are struck often by lightning, but due to the metal hulls and all the contact with the water death seldom occur unless a person on deck is struck directly.

    Lightning is capable of blowing a hole in the hull of a boat that is not properly protected from a strike.

    Boats with cabins are by far the safest way to ride out a storm if no shelter is available. Most deaths on boats occur on boats with no cabin. If you are stuck out on the water with no option for safe port, achoring the boat is the best bet as this provides a safe position while you take shelter and it provides a link to the ground to discharge.
     
  6. dcaruthers

    dcaruthers New Member

    Messages:
    756
    State:
    Alabama
    Good post. Thanks for the info.
     
  7. badkarma

    badkarma New Member

    Messages:
    772
    State:
    Oxford,Miss
    I took a lightning hit in 1985 and was lucky,it knocked me 18-20 feet and didn't do much damage to me but I was shaking like a posom passing peach pits the rest of the day.I have no tolerance for lightning and it scares the hell out of me but all 12 months of 1987 I lived on a sailboat with no fear of lightning but I did have a 35ft al. mast that was bonded to the water over me and that makes a very good lightning rod.Have heard of St.Elmo's Fire? I saw it in the rigging of my boat one night when I was in a thunder storm and the mast and stays as a mater of fact all the rigging had a blue glow from the mast head to the deck.That was the wildest looking thing I've ever layed my eyes on !!:waaaht:
     
  8. teaysvalleyguy

    teaysvalleyguy New Member

    Messages:
    9,751
    State:
    GC, OHIO
    I dont play with lighting, if I see it I get off the water. Not scared of it, just like to live is all. :cool2:
     
  9. Kyle

    Kyle New Member

    Messages:
    347
    State:
    Kansas City - Olathe
    Its the ONLY thing that will keep me lake. I see the flashes I head to the dock and get ready to take cover but will still keep a line in if practical. But if I see one single bolt, I'm done, off the water untill its well gone. Don't play around with that stuff.
     
  10. MississippiJugHead

    MississippiJugHead New Member

    Messages:
    147
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks for all the great advice. Its great to get all the help with baits and lures but information that can keep you alive is priceless.
     
  11. tatersalad

    tatersalad New Member

    Messages:
    438
    State:
    Clover, SC
    He doesn't play with the lightning. I agree completely with his point of view. I'd rather live to fish another day!
     
  12. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    Couple years ago a little thunderhead came over. No thunder or lighting... then wham, it struck a pine in our yard about 80 ft from the house. There was no more lighting or thunder from that cloud.

    I always get off the water if I see a cloud coming up. In fact I never get on the water if there is any anything showing nearby on radar. But this is no inconvenience since I live on a lake.
     
  13. RiverratSC

    RiverratSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,646
    State:
    Gaffney, SC
    When lightning comes, I go.:lol: