light line for big flathead catfish

Discussion in 'Flathead Catfish' started by liveforcattin08, Feb 26, 2006.

  1. liveforcattin08

    liveforcattin08 New Member

    Messages:
    144
    State:
    ohio
    im thinkin of spooling all my big cat rods with 10 or 12 pound test. i fish in a medium sized river and i was thinking when i hook a monster ill could follow it around with a canoe until it tires. i got the idea from a fishin show where they caught a stergeon that went 100+ pounds on 12 pound line. they just stayed above it with a boat until it tired. does anyone know the record for flathead catfish on 10 or 12 pound test?
     
  2. Baitkiller

    Baitkiller New Member

    Messages:
    1,029
    State:
    Akron, Ohio
    The Ohio IGFA on 12# test is 20# (7/05/02)

    Seach under IGFA for the IGFA rules on leaders, approved 12# test lines etc.

    I've read I think were there is a new record but have not found it :confused:
     

  3. maddcatter

    maddcatter New Member

    Messages:
    614
    State:
    Newark, Oh
    If there is heavy cover in the area you fish, light line might not be the best idea. If it's open water, heck yeah! Break that record!
     
  4. liveforcattin08

    liveforcattin08 New Member

    Messages:
    144
    State:
    ohio
    there is some cover but i think if i could stay above them i could keep them out. did you say the record for 12 pound test is 20 pounds?
     
  5. Drum Andersen

    Drum Andersen New Member

    Messages:
    221
    State:
    Nebraska
    Fighting big fish w/ light line is a blast, but I don't know if I would use it on a big flathead, I hate to lose a nice fish.
     
  6. Baitkiller

    Baitkiller New Member

    Messages:
    1,029
    State:
    Akron, Ohio
    At least that is what is on the net. I think one has to be an "IGFA Member" to get the title tooooo!!

    I did look into it a bit last year on Grass Carp after seenin a 50+ incher locked into a steam pool. Could have landed him on 4#, lol !

    If ya want to spend the $$$$ that should be an easy one to break guy. If ya decide to go for it and have problems, I'll show you a spot that you should be able to do it with 5 days (opinion).
     
  7. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    I have caught small flathead (Up to 10 lb or so) on line as light as 6 lb test while crappie fishing. It was about as much as a guy could handle without being in a boat.

    I hooked a flathead...got a BRIEF look at it....that was 25 lb plus...on 20 lb/6 lb diameter power pro braid line while whitebass fishing one time. The problem wasn't the line breaking...it was the thin wire hook in the jig head I was using. The fish just decided to camp out on the bottom right underneath the boat...and wouldn't budge. I stayed on the fish for over 30 minutes...it wouldn't move. I kept pumping the rod...trying to get it to move again...but finally bent the hook, and it got away.

    From that day on I started using 2/0 Gamakatsu heavy wire hooks in my jigheads when I whitebass fish. Not just for the catfish that are inevitably hooked...but the wiper as well. They can give you a bad day too.

    Be prepared to wait a big flat out if you hook one...it could take awhile!
     
  8. Shawn

    Shawn New Member

    Messages:
    408
    State:
    Illinois
    The main place I fish has some flats in the 20# class (I haven't been able to hook-up with one yet) and a fish over 30# is very rare.

    I'm using 15# High Impact mono, and I wouldn't go below that for flatheads close to cover. If your fishing near wood, or bridge footings, plan on some line scrapes happening during a fight. If you start with heavier line, you'll have a lot better chance getting the fish to the boat. Get a scrape on 10-12# mono, and it would break for sure. Other guys I fish with use 20# mono, so I'm on the lighter side with the 15#. I like the way the 15# line handles as opposed to 20#, I use it on spinning and baitcasting gear.

    If you're after giant flatheads (40-50# and up), I would probably use 20# mono or superbraid that's about the same thickness. Or use dacron. I still have one reel spooled with 36# dacron.

    Shawn
     
  9. Larry

    Larry New Member

    Messages:
    707
    State:
    Minnesota
    I say Go For IT!!!!
    If you have someone to handle your canoe while your fighting the fish.
    In all likely hood you might have wished that you went with a heavier line.
    I saw a fish snapp 30lb braid like a strand of hair. (IT didnt help that some other joker grabbed the line .... thankfully not mine).
    I know that when I hooked my biggest 27lbr I was sweating the tackle and gear. I was using 30lb braid 8lb mono dia. with an older Cardinal 753 spinning reel. It took me 20 min and help from my two boat companions to land my personal best to date.
    Good Luck
    keep us posted on what you use and how it works out.
    thanks
    Larry
     
  10. s_man

    s_man New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    south east ohio
    Live for cattin larry, yes you can try it. Just spool one of your rods with 4lb trilene big game then put on some corn for bait then cast in the nearest river. If you can bring in a 20lb carp with it then you can catch a 20lb flathead. I couldn't even cast my bait and sinker with 4lb test line.LOL If you really want a challenge go with 20lb mono and the biggest bait you can catch, 2 to 4 lbs. If you hook a 25lb or over you'll have more than you can handle. If you want to try send me a PM, I'll take you out on the river this summer and put you on some 25/30 lb fish. But I get to videotape any hook ups,O.K.
     
  11. SangamonCatKiller

    SangamonCatKiller New Member

    Messages:
    488
    State:
    central illinois
    I would be very weary landing big fish on that light of line. Even after you are able to battle them away from cover(if) you have to land the fish. From experience, Flatheads don't like hooks, the bank, boats. Good luck !
     
  12. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    Don't forget when they see the net! I've had them swim right up to the boat or to the bank...see the net...and then turn tail back downstream and promptly spool me and break me off in the process.
     
  13. liveforcattin08

    liveforcattin08 New Member

    Messages:
    144
    State:
    ohio
    i dont have a problem gettin hooked up with big fish its just the spots are pretty nasty with lots of snags. it would definatley be challenge on such light line that for sure. the fish in my profile pic i got in with 40 pound mono in about 5 minuets.
     
  14. maddcatter

    maddcatter New Member

    Messages:
    614
    State:
    Newark, Oh
    Baitkiller, I don't believe you have to be a member to get the fish certified to the IGFA. There is a fee for members and non-members. The non-member fee is higher.
     
  15. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    All of my cat rigs are spooled with 15 pound test Trilene Big Game. Each season I am lucky enough to land flatheads exceeding 40 pounds. Thing is, I am lucky to be fishing in an area where I don't have to worry about cover much. I believe that flatheads don't immediately head for cover intentionally. The fish that I have lost because they swam into a downed tree or around a log, I really believe that they were just headed that direction and the snag happened to be there.

    SO, I deffinately think you could catch a 20 or 30 pound flathead on 10 or 12 pound line. There's a couple of things to be aware of, though. 1) make sure your reel's drag is clean and smooth and set properly and 2) if you are going to try to get a record certified remember that the line class records are based on the breaking strength of the line, NOT what is marked on the spool. The 15 pound Big Game I fish with actually breaks at about 22 pounds, so if I wanted to certify a catch on that line it would go in a category for 22 pound or heavier line. Several companies make line that is certified to break at the marked strength OR LESS (like Ande Tournament). Regular line, though, is guaranteed to break at AT LEAST the marked test.
     
  16. Willy

    Willy New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Missouri
    One thing to think about is are you going to release the fish afterwards,are you ready to do what ever it takes to get the fish in shape for release. While fighting a larger fish on light line the fish will build large amounts of lactic acid due to the length of the fight and recovery will take time for the fish.I am not saying not to try but if you respect the big fish like I do records come in last.You need to read about what it takes to get one certified and have someone lined up to help with the process,and you have to do all the work yourself but the landing in the net. No one can hold the pole or touch the line while in the actual fighting of the fish.
     
  17. Gone fishin 4 kittys

    Gone fishin 4 kittys New Member

    Messages:
    678
    State:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    liveforcattin08,


    If your concerned about getting more line onto your reels with more strength you mighta want to try a superline like power pro or spiderwire or stren braid.

    Ofcourse you would probally need to set the drag right. If you hook into a big one it can really mess up the inside of your reel, it could also mess up your rod tips if thier not the right kind.

    Alot of people think that you need 20# or 30# test to go after the big ones, but you really don't. It helps and to each thier own but if you tire the fish out you don't have to as much. Most people who fish for Marlin and sailfish only use a good 20lb line.

    Superlines won't break as easy as mono will in cover but it's always a good idea to use a leader with them, I would.

    Just an idea!

    Josh
     
  18. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    I use both mono and braid line for various different applications. The things that I've noticed about braid line that I do dislike is that braid doesn't stand up well to rocks...it frays easily and really doesn't have great abrasion resistance. Another thing is that it tends to cut itself inside the spool. Some people also claim it also cuts a groove in your rod guides...although I haven't noticed it doing so to my Fuji guides.