Licensed Guide service

Discussion in 'LOCAL NORTH CAROLINA TALK' started by Bryan8552, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. Bryan8552

    Bryan8552 New Member

    Messages:
    422
    State:
    nc
    Does anyone know what the requirements are to be a properly licensed guide here in NC. It's apparent that you can purchase a NC guide license from the State, it costs $10.00. It "seems" as though The Coast Guard also may require a license in addition to that. Does anyone know the answer, or know where the answer can be found in writing?
     
  2. natethe great

    natethe great New Member

    Messages:
    111
    State:
    North carolina
    talk to ncfowler (jeff) im pretty sure he is licenced and im sure he could tell u all bout the requirements well till next time good fishing.
     

  3. billfish76

    billfish76 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,133
    State:
    Rock Hill, SC
    I believe that it depends on the body of water you are fishing as to if you need a CG license. But you will need the proper insurance, and business license.
     
  4. Larry

    Larry New Member

    Messages:
    707
    State:
    Minnesota
    USCG licences are really applicable to Federal Waterways, Inland waters in our area include the Mississippi River and its main Tributaries, Great Lakes and Oceans. Its a great feather in your cap to have one and list as a guide but probably not a necessity with the USCG in your area.
    I will qualify that I live in MN and the course I attended was geared for the Upper Miss, tributaries and Great lakes.
    I would consult some of the following schools to see what they think to be sure,
    this is one of the first steps. Good luck.
    I hope to have my licence in the next 4-6 weeks.

    Here is a link.
    http://www.uscg.mil/stcw/mmic-regions.htm
     
  5. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    sounds like a great plan. Fishing for money is a good way to spend the day. Maybe I can pull it off one day
     
  6. ncfowler

    ncfowler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,656
    State:
    NC
    Name:
    Jeff
    it took me many hous of research and questions to get this answer, pay the 10 bucks and your a guide, you should have boaters insurance anyway, what i did was get a extra libilaity insurance. I have a fed ein # and a state tax # too but this is a carry over form a previous business, all i did was added my guide srevice on it. most in land waters lakes and some rivers you don't need a captains cert, you need to see what bodies of water your fishing if you need one. Being a guide is more than the paper work it is knowing the area your fishing well, real well thats why you will see guides only offering up a few lakes or rivers. I only have been doing if for 3 yrs and now just starting to get repeat clients. I also guide for waterfowl. either way it is fun i don't fish much when i guide unless i'm asked to join in, your attention is on your clients and getting them on the fish. If they are happy then your business will take off. I will sometimes invite clients out as my guest. I now have a fishing partner i take out a lot that was my client at one time, sometimes you need to know. for me it is not bout the money but getting more people into cat fishing and the fun the are.
     
  7. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    In NC there is a "guide license" you can purchase. Technically thats all it takes.

    Like I said in the SC thread, if you operate a boat it is a different story and governed by a separate set of federal laws. Anyone who is "HIRED" to operate a boat that carries passengers is required to have a captains license if they operate on navigable waters.

    You can "guide" people all day from the shore, a pier, or their boat, but if you are hired to operate a boat you need a captains license.

    Here it is in the US Code:

    http://uscode.house.gov/download/pls/46C87.txt
    http://uscode.house.gov/download/pls/46C89.txt
     
  8. ncfowler

    ncfowler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,656
    State:
    NC
    Name:
    Jeff
    i made a e-mail to the nc gamecom to get there take on guide on inland waters. i will make a post when i get an answer back. I asked several gw bout this same subject several times and there take is all you need is a guide license.
     
  9. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    Let me make this perfectly clear; being a GUIDE and [B]being a BOAT CAPTAIN are TWO TOTALLY DIFFERENT THINGS!![/B]

    Correct NCFowler, that is all you need to be a "guide", but when you are hired to operate a boat on navigable waters you need a captains license.

    Like I said earllier, you can guide someone all you want from a pier, the shore, wading, or on their boat, and the state issued guide license will work fine. Things change when they hire you to take them on YOUR boat on navigable waters you are entering into totally different territory.

    Personally, I don't know of anyone what has ever hired a guide to take them to a good stretch of bank to fish.

    NCWRC officers (game wardens) have NOTHING to do with the enforcement of laws concerning vessels for hire. Follow the links provided above and you can learn more. You need to contact the US Coast Guard to get the correct answer the question you are asking.
     
  10. billfish76

    billfish76 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,133
    State:
    Rock Hill, SC
    Things change when they hire you to take them on YOUR boat on navigable waters you are entering into totally different territory.

    Thats the main thing to look at, Where are you planning on Guiding, or using your boat for hire????

    For instance, Lake Wylie is covered by the USCG, cause its a border lake. You need to have your USCG captains license to have poeple pay you to take them out on the lake.
     
  11. Brendin0702

    Brendin0702 New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    North Carolina
    Billfish76 I have some ?'s about saltwater fishing can you help me?
     
  12. Bryan8552

    Bryan8552 New Member

    Messages:
    422
    State:
    nc

    My friend who wants to become a guide at Kerr Lake finally got in touch with someone at one of the Coast Guard offices. They said that you definitely do need a Coast Guard OUPV License to guide on Kerr Lake. This license will allow you to carry up to six passengers as far as 99 miles offshore. They also said that the reason Kerr is USCG territory is because, as Billfish76 said above, it rests on the border of NC and VA. He didn't ask about any other waters. I'm sure there are some exceptions (such as whitewater rafting) but at this point in time I don't know what they are. Be careful! It carries up to a $25,000.00 fine!

    Dieter,

    You seem to be pretty savvy about searching things down on the web! In the SC section you posted a link to a map showing all of SC's "Navigable Waters". Would you happen to have the link to the map showing them for the Tarheel State?
     
  13. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

    Messages:
    13,546
    Okay.....now I have a question. I read the info contained in the links you provided and although I consider myself an intelligent woman, I think it is/would be confusing to a normal person (i.e., one who isn't normally trying to comprehend information such as that). Navigable, to me, meant waters able to be navigated.......and why would someone be attempting to navigate waters (in a boat) that aren't? Although I've seen a few dummies try to do it on occasion :smile2:.

    Anyhow, this isn't a USCG definition, just a plain old Webster's dictionary one; but it says:

    navigable - wide or deep enough, or free enough of obstructions, for the passage of SHIPS

    I don't think most of the guides I'm familiar with helm SHIPS?
     
  14. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    Catgirl, great question/point.

    Bryan, I have never seen a map of navigable waters for NC.

    The term navigable waters is a legal term that can be somewhat nebulous. Therefore, when you Google it you find your share of legal proceedings defining it!!

    Basically, navigable waterways are any waterway on which maritime commerce can be carried out. This covers just about any waterway that the public has access to. An example of an exception would the lakes created by Walt Disney World in Florida. These are private waterways and therefore not navigable. Another example is Lake Monticello just outside of Columbia, because was created on a creek with water piped in from an adjacent river and it is privately owned.

    The truth of the matter is that no one is ever going to check your captain’s license, unless of course you have an accident and someone is injured. At that point the gloves are off, and your liability insurance could actually be voided if you were not “operating with local laws” at the time of the accident.
     
  15. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

    Messages:
    13,546
    Thanks for the response Diet. Heck, I don't think I even wanna see what all comes up if you Google it :smile2:. I've heard being a maritime lawyer is the most difficult job as far as attorneys go, and I can believe that! :confused2:
     
  16. Larry

    Larry New Member

    Messages:
    707
    State:
    Minnesota
    WylieCat, If the waters listed are under USCG juristiction you could be checked. For any number of reasons, What you don't want to happen is get stopped by the DNR, checked and they find out you have paying passengers on board, and then put a friendly call into the USCG. The rest of your statement is correct. If you are taking others on your boat for PAY acting as an operator and Captian you are responsible for everything.
     
  17. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    "...If you are taking others on your boat for PAY acting as an operator and Captian you are responsible for everything...."

    That sums it up well! Like I said earlier, you can be a guide all day long and go out on people boat with them and there is no problem. When they hire you and you have to transport them on your vessel it is another story. The problem on our inland waters Larry is that there is no US Coast Guard enforcement in place since the SCDNR and NCWRC have been given jurisdiction for enforcement. Even if there was an accident, nothing would be said of it until it was pursued in court.

    Sadly, being a licensed Captain has NOTHING to do with being a good guide or a good fisherman. Its a nice title, you learn some good sayings like "red-right-return", but the fishing is something you either know or don't know. There is absolutely NOTHING in the Captains course or test about fishing or being a guide.
     
  18. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    19,547
    State:
    North Caro
    I want to thank you'll for bringing this subject up. It made me go and relook at my charter fishing insurance.
     
  19. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    19,547
    State:
    North Caro
    Sorry, the system sent my previous message to post before I was thru. Here is what my policy says about this matter.

    In consideration of the premium charged, it is hereby understood and agreed that under PART H: GENERAL CONDITIONS AND EXCLUSIONS the LICENSED CAPTAIN WARRANTY is deleted and substituted with the following:

    Warranted that while the insured craft is engaged in a commercial venture, the Owner/Operator shall be in control of the vessel at all times, and operate the vessel in accordance with state and local rules of operation.

    So, the best policy is to let the insurance company know up front that you are not a license USCG Capt.
     
  20. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    19,547
    State:
    North Caro
    I received an e-mail from the Lighthouse Marine Service, which conducts classes for the USCG Capt's license in North Carolina and elsewhere. They state that you do not need a Captains license for Lake Norman.

    I also talked to two other license Captains on Lake Norman and they said the same thing. If there is no USCG stationed on a lake, then no license in rerquired. The presence of a USCG Aux. is not to be confused with the USCG. The Aux. is there for educational purposes for the general public and for rescue purposes.

    The above has been my understanding for 15 plus years, but the lastest scuttlebutt had me questioning what I thought I knew from the past.

    I would assume this is applicable to Mtn. Island and all the lakes above Lake Norman (Hickory, James, Rhodhiss, etc). Mac