Leaving the spool open on reel

Discussion in 'Flathead Catfish' started by chris45601, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    Im confused i have always left my spool closed and tight lined it but is it better to leave it open i mean For flat head fishing i have a pretty nice size live fish on the end that could swim?
     
  2. barbel

    barbel New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Somewhere
    You do whatever works for you. If you are catching fish doing what you are doing do not stop. Better is only better in terms of being able to catch fish. If you are already catching them, you arent going to be doing too much better by changing. I like to leave the spool open, and it works for me, but it may be different for you. I hope this helps.
     

  3. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    But, what does leaving the spool open acutally do i mean does it help you see the fish run with it or what not?
     
  4. vegasryder

    vegasryder New Member

    Messages:
    324
    State:
    illinois
    I always loosen the drag all the way on mine.This way the fish has a chance to engulf it and the sound of drag will let me know if i happen to dose off.
     
  5. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    ok so it does help im sure if the fish feels the wieght of the rod or what not he won't take it
     
  6. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Okay, fish are a lot like people, some uglier, some prettier. They are at times, very, very sensitive. If they take a live perch, crawdad, minnow, etc. and feel a tension they don't normally feel, they will spit the bait out. By leaving the bail on a spinning reel open, it allows the fish to take the bait w/o feeling the tension. So, how do you fish it then... several ways. 1) set there with the pole in your hand so you can see/feel the line spooling off the reel. 2) loop a rubber band around your pole, about 6 inches in front of the reel, double your line until you have a loop and pass it under 1 strand of the rubber band. This should hold your bait steady, and when you notice the loop is no longer under the rubber band, you have had a bite. 3) rubber band a clothes pin onto your rod. Put a small loop of your line in the clothes pin. When it pops out of the clothes pin, you have had a bite. 4) attach a small ribbon to your line after it comes through the tip of your pole. Easy to see it head for the water. 5) Close the bail and use circle hooks.
     
  7. catseeman

    catseeman New Member

    Messages:
    1,189
    State:
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Sometimes a fish will grab a bait and run with it to position it for eating.


    closed bail = the fish may drop bait before eating it when it feels the resistance of the pole. ( circle hooks are supoosed to work this way.)



    Open bail= very little resistance when a fish grabs the bait. (you have to close the bail in order to set hook.)

    I place a rubber band on the rod handle just in front of the reelseat, after casting and tightening the line, I the open the bail and slip a loop of line under the rubberband. the fish feels little pressure of the line and the line doesnt come off the reel until the fish bites.

    I hope this helps.
     
  8. sairving

    sairving New Member

    Messages:
    314
    State:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    I try to tightine mine, although per lawnman61 (my hubby) I never have it tight enough. LOL I also loosen my drag so if the perch whatever is alive as bait it can't go to far away and give you false hope. I get a lot of that. Good luck. But most of the time I have my finger on the string and I hold my rod. I like to feel the bite.
     
  9. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    Yeh that seems like a good idea because latley we have had a problem with the fish hitting but not taking the bait. ill try these and se what happens
     
  10. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    Mainly flatheads, but i have had problems with them too im sure i have had two big flat heads last weekend hit it pull the tip of the rod down and let go leaving me with no time to even think about hooking up. I think the fish are senstive there. I put a bunch of those little hair rubber bands in my tackle box. so we'll see what happens
     
  11. whiteriverbigcats

    whiteriverbigcats New Member

    Messages:
    3,452
    State:
    Indiana
    I would just go out and find you a $40 bait runner... i have sucess with mine and i bought it for 40 bucks... this way you wouldnt have to worry about watching the line...
     
  12. AllenM

    AllenM Guest

    Now THOSE are some good ideas!! I never thought of the rubber band or clothes pin tricks to put a loop in the line, or even of tying anything to the line after casting to see it roll out. I've fished both open and closed reel styles, but always just held on to the rod or at least kept a close eye on the line to see when it takes off. When fishing a closed reel I've usually held on to it so I could feel the bite and react quickly before they drop it, but sometimes with the big rod I've just sat back and waited for it to try to fold in half, cause the big ones out here seem not to care about resistance much. They've generally given a long hard tug of war with the rod for a few seconds before dropping the bait, usually giving me time to grab it up and set the hook. I've used bells in the past, but they became an annoyance, cause the guys I fished with kept picking up their rods and jangling them around for a few minutes at a time instead of taking the danged things off and puting them back on when they was done doing what ever they was doing with the rod. I got REAL tired of hearing jingle bells thanks to that! :crazy:
     
  13. primitive

    primitive Member

    Messages:
    263
    State:
    Dav. Ia.
    Chris, What you described sounds like Gar. I watched gar tug and tug on blue gill on branchlines, the hook would tear out and hook and line would fly up on the limb. primitive
     
  14. serb

    serb New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    Drexel Hill, PA
  15. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    I've used those jingle bell thing before the annoying as hell i do have those little hair rubber bands to get my loop in my line as i should be good and for the channels i have plent of panty hose so they have to grab it.
     
  16. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    Hmm when i get bored ill whip out my gar snag bait and have some fun lol. idk maybe it was a gar. but i mean even with little channels and chicken liver they been busting my butt
     
  17. Davidsed505

    Davidsed505 New Member

    Messages:
    43
    State:
    Ohio
    If I'm using cut shad or liver for channels, I wrap a pipe cleaner around the rod, about level with the bail, leaving about an inch or so sticking straight out from the rod. Then after opening the bail, I pull the line behind the pipe cleaner wire, making sure it secure enough that a gust of wind won't blow it off, yet will produce next to no resistance when a strike comes. I usually test it out beforehand. I like it to where the tip of the rod will move slightly, not bend, before the line comes free from the pipe cleaner. I started doing this after a fish-less couple of weeks, getting great first strikes, then nothing, bait still there when I reeled in. Doing this has helped me catch more. I haven't tried this with live bait however. I'll have to give it a try. The one thing I have noticed, however, is that by placing the line down further on the pipe cleaner, you can increase the amount of pull required to free the line.
     
  18. AllenM

    AllenM Guest

    Ok, what's a bait runner or a bait feeder? I know what a bait CASTER is, but these two terms I've not heard before.
     
  19. Davidsed505

    Davidsed505 New Member

    Messages:
    43
    State:
    Ohio
    A baitrunner is generally a spinning reel with a secondary drag system, meaning, you can utilize the secondary drag to basically allow the spool to rotate freely with the bail closed. They usually have a lever at the rear of the reel. To engage the drag (stop the free-spool), you flick the lever. I've been wanting to get one, but the old lady thinks I a)have enough rods and reels and b)can't find one cheap enough to fund out of the ole penny jar.
     
  20. chris45601

    chris45601 New Member

    Messages:
    357
    State:
    ohio
    It's an open faced reel basiclly i think it may have reverse on it. all i use is bait casters and spincast, On my big game pole i have a chakespeare tiger spincast reel