Leave gas in carb, or shut off fuel and let engine die??

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by daniel-delarosa, Oct 19, 2009.

  1. daniel-delarosa

    daniel-delarosa New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    seminole, oklahoma
    I have a little 2000 Mercury 5hp 2-stroke. The guy I got it from told me to make sure I shut off the fuel while the engine is still running and let it die. He said if I didn't, I will have carb problems. He says that is the way you do all small outboards.Does this sound fishy to anyone else?:confused2:
     
  2. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    On a single carb engine it won't hurt anything but you still won't get all the fuel out' The best thing is to take the little plug out of the bottom of the carb and drain it if you gonna let it set awhile.
    On a duel carbed motor I would not recommend running it at all until the carbs are dry.
     

  3. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    I always run mine out of gas. I have worked on them and this is the best method. Take the hose fitting off the motor and run it out. If I forget then I always have problems. Mine starts everytime. The oil will foul the plugs. I see it all the time.
     
  4. playin4funami

    playin4funami New Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    State:
    Saronville Ne.
    If my boats gonna get used again in the next two or three weeks I don't worry about it at all and leave the fuel in there,If it's the end of the season I disconnect the fuel line and let it idle till I hear it start to miss,then shut it off and at home pull the fuel bowl plugs drain the bowls and,with muffs on and water going crank the motor over a few times to pull any fuel out of the carbs,on a single carb I just let it run dry after pulling the fuel line and have never had any problem season to season,even with a little bit of gas in the bottom of the bowl,as long as the needle valves and jets are dry,but they do get reg. cleaning/rebuild every three years.
     
  5. plainsman

    plainsman New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    7,187
    State:
    minnesota
    I dont' know about 2 cycle, but for my small 4 stroke engines I always run em dry. I never know when I will use em again.
     
  6. ammo warrior

    ammo warrior Member

    Messages:
    868
    State:
    Columbia, MO
    On a smaller carb like that it is real good for em to get drained and clean the spark plugs during the off season...:cool2:
     
  7. beetle

    beetle New Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    Ohio
    I used to drain mine but don't any more. A mechanic working on an engine for me told me not to run mine dry. He said it dries out the gaskets and hoses can crack. He said to just add a fuel stabilizer at the end of the season to keep the fuel from turning bad. My manual on my new evinrude motor says the same thing, just fill tank and add a stabilizer and run a few minutes before storing.
     
  8. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    Man even with fuel stabalizer gas can go bad. Water can be absorbed but still does not combust. It can cause hydrolich lock. Water can destroy your gaskets before running them dry. They come out of the package dry. But if your motor is under warramty do what the manufacturer tells you not anyone else. New 2 strokes are a different breed.
     
  9. Iowa_Josh

    Iowa_Josh New Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    State:
    Central Iowa
    It's simple. Stabilizing gas isn't so simple and he has to give out the same explaination a lot of times. Running a two stroke out of gas is like draining the oil out of your car and running it for a little while to make sure you got all of the oil out. The oil is in the gas, etc.. I'm not sure if it is the way but one way is to run the motor and squirt fogging oil in the carb until it dies and it's preserved for the winter or longer. It would seem necessary near saltwater or really high humidity. It also does nothing to the carb but it's one way of putting away for winter.

    I've been seafoaming regular gas and feeding the old gas in the tank to my car so I can have fresh in the spring. I think I'll empty out my gas lines this year too, I never thought of that until I read it recently.
     
  10. beetle

    beetle New Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    Ohio
    I'm not sure how to explain this so bare with me. Stabilizer does more than just absorb water, have you ever picked up an old gas can with some gas that was left in it? It turns into like a syrup consistency and smells bad. Also you can take two gaskets, soak one in gas a few days and not the other let that dry out and feel how brittle the one soaked in gas will get. It made sense to me when the guy told me, but thats just my experience and opinion.
     
  11. shadmaster

    shadmaster New Member

    Messages:
    123
    State:
    OK
    Running it dry would be OK on a 2 stroke if it happens to be a single cylinder but not many of those around. On the multi cylinder engines (2 stroke) you are depriving at least one cylinder of lubrication as it starts to quit. You can hear it start missing and takes a long time before it dies. All that time one or move cylinders are getting no or very little lube. Will lead to an early death for that engine.
     
  12. Bigbluefisherman

    Bigbluefisherman New Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    State:
    Missouri
    I never run mine dry, but I use it year around. I have heard it is not good on them.
     
  13. bnt55

    bnt55 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Northern KY
    Use your boat for fishing every week in the spring and summer and early fall, then use your boat for duck hunting in the winter till january...repeat process. The boat will sit a maximum of 2 months out of he year and gas stabilizer will hold you over for that short period:wink:
     
  14. catman-j

    catman-j New Member

    Messages:
    1,020
    State:
    Eastern Nebr
    It would be better to drain the carb. My Merc has a fuel filter bowl that holds gas so it should be drained too. The oil you put in the gas is there to lubricate the cylinder walls. Without it you're running a dry engine. Drain the gas and spray some fog oil in the spark plug holes and pull the rope a few times. Clean the fog oil off the spark plugs in the spring. Rather than storing my gas all winter I sometimes dump mine in my van with at least 20 gallons of fresh gas. The oil is so diluted down that you can hardly tell it's even there.