Learning book for boating?

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by bootshowl, Oct 25, 2007.

  1. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Went with a buddy up to Patoka Lake this last Sunday as he just got a Bayliner inboard he wanted to try out. It's an old one, 87 I think, & had a great time. But it finally came to me how lil I know about boating. I caught myself thinking, "Can ya turn this puppy over if ya corner too fast?" & also, "How does a speedometer on a boat work?". I'm awful old to know so lil. Is there a great book of general knowledge anyone could recommend?
     
  2. riverwiskers

    riverwiskers New Member

    Messages:
    120
    State:
    kelly nc
    Hey Gary, dont know of a book on boating , if I did I would have a copy myself. I am 37 years old and just got my first boat. It is just a one man creek boat. Hoping to get a decent cat boat by spring though. My suggestion to you and me is ask specific questions on this site if there is something particular you want to know. As you know, the folks here have a lot of knowledge in all aspects of fishing and dont mind taking the time to help a brother out. Hope that helps. Dale
     

  3. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Thanks Dale. Also wondered maybe a magazine for us....I have a small fishing boat also. It's not a problem, easy to understand, and use by myself. It was just a wake up call for me. I never learned how to "play" an have fun. Life's full of work and obligations. Some fun pursuits are as complicated as a job. I think boating may be one of them.
     
  4. Rogue

    Rogue New Member

    Messages:
    26
    State:
    US Louisiana
    Public Library in your area ?
     
  5. catfish kenny

    catfish kenny New Member

    Messages:
    6,064
    State:
    Iowa
    Fellas I got my first boat 3 years ago.All I knew was taught to me from my uncle when I way wee lill lad. If I had to say anything COMMON SENCE....
    over time you will learn "EXPERIENCE IS THE BEST TEACHJER CONSIDERING WHAT IT COST IT SHOULD BE " Specific questions and youll get answears here fer sure.The first and fore most LIFE JACKET and be safe so ya can go ouut again
     
  6. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
  7. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    I don't know of a book, but I might be able to shed light on your questions. I would be shocked if you could turn a boat large enough to be equipped with an inboard or I/O hard enough to flip it. That said, just use common sense. A Bass boat flying along at 50-70 mph could very well catch air and flip, but a Bayliner is not likely to.

    The speedometer on my boat is very high tech. I consists of a little wheel attached to the transom next to my transducer. The faster you go, the faster the wheel turns sending the information via a wire to my depthfinder.

    No I have never seen the hamster and his snorkel running on that wheel....
     
  8. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Here are some links to another boat-handling site:

    http://www.docksidereports.com/small_boat_safety_at_sea.htm

    Also, you could buy a copy of Chapman's "Piloting, Seamanship, and Small Boat Handling". (600+ pages) It looks like it go for about $10 on ebay, including shipping. It looks like Amazon has them used for about the same price.

    And check with your local Fish & Game Department. They generally have, sponsor, or recommend a local course.
     
  9. Ketch

    Ketch New Member

    Messages:
    469
    State:
    Minnesota
    Boots, all great questions. Luckily, I have been around boats all of my life. Before my father passed away, he spent 30+ years designing and manufacturing fiberglass boats.

    Yes, a boat can tip itself over by turning a corner too sharply. This is extremely rare, and as a rule, no boat is going to do that without some kind of help from somethign else. If you turn hard enough with a high powered boat AND hit a wave just right, you can overturn. Also, wind gusts can help. Most fishing boats can NOT do this to themselves. They just don't have the power. Jet boats would definitely be more prone to doing this. Personal watercraft are actually quite prone to flipping and are defined as a class A powerboat.

    Speedometers on boats come in several varieties. Typical boats come with the "wheeled" unit. Others come with a pitot tube. It is essentially a forward facing tube that calculates speed by gauging water pressure into this tube. Some extremely high dollar units on expensive rigs use gps to figure speeds. The GPS method is far more accurate than the other two.

    The wheel type speedometer is greatly effected by several things. The most common interference comes from air bubbles interfering with the flow of water through the wheel. Mounting location on these is crucial. It must be mounted so that it isn't in the turbulence generated by prop wash and not mounted along the ribs of the bottom of the boat. These ribs cause channelling of water and thus effect water/air flow through the wheel.

    The pitot type speedometer will be greatly effected by how you boat is loaded and how it sits in the water. If you aren't on plane, or are heavily loaded in the front or rear, then the water pressure going into the tube will be effected.

    A lot of factory installed speedometers on low end boats are the wheel type. This is the cheapest method available and can easily be purchased with depth finders. Pitot tubes will be available on more up scale boats. I have only seen GPS units on things offshore boats and yachts personally, but am sure others do offer it.
     
  10. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Hitting a big wave while turning can be a bummer, too. The only time I was ever scared in my 20' Robalo was going in to the harbor at Clearwater, Florida, where you have to make several turns. Just as I was making one, I hit a wave from a sportfisherman. The boat came halfway out of the water, and for a second I thought it was going over. I never had any problem when I was fishing the Pacific, with waves up to 12', but I never hit them turning very sharp.