Lead pouring question

Discussion in 'LOCAL KANSAS TALK' started by smhmc6, May 6, 2009.

  1. smhmc6

    smhmc6 Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    For those of you who pour your own sinkers, I have a question. I know you are supposed to keep the mold hot. After you pour into your mold, can you pop the sinkers out pretty quickly or do you have to let them (and the mold) cool down quite a bit? Also I'm using a turkey fryer, so whats the easiest way to keep the mold hot... can I just kind of wedge the mold between the pot and the ring around the pot to keep it on/close to the flames? Or would that be keeping it too hot? One more question. I'll be pouring all no roll sinkers... I assume you can buy wires or use a close hanger to make the holes in the middle, but since I'm making so many of them would it be easier to just cast all of them and then use a drill to drill all the holes out and debur them? I think I got it mostly figured out, but any little tips/secrets would be great.
     
  2. Backlashed

    Backlashed New Member

    Messages:
    3,270
    State:
    Derby, Kansas
    Once you get started the mold will retain enough heat that you shouldn't have to put it on the burner.
    Use a little Pam cooking spray on the wires, and pull them before you open the mold. Once you get a routine going, it will go pretty fast.

    Good luck

    PS about de-burring them with a drill bit,...I actually counter bore them a little.
    That way you don't need a bead above it to keep from hitting the knot.
     

  3. smhmc6

    smhmc6 Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    Thanks Ray. I suppose the first pour then you just put back in the pot towards the end. How long do you leave them in the mold before you pop 'em out? Like 5-10 seconds or what? Thanks again for the tip. I bet that pam trick works pretty good. Do you spray anything in the mold itself or do they pop out pretty clean?
     
  4. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    What Ray said. You can open the mold as soon as you pull the pins out. No need to let mold cool off completely. I generally mold two are three rounds without pins to heat the mold up and throw those back into the pot. This will heat the mold up on the start. Pam spray works great on the pins, without a lot of mess. Good luck Steve.
     
  5. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    a propane bottle torch is a great tool for sinker making. i use it to warm up my molds before i use them cause they will draw moisture and water and hot lead is bad, you could wave um above your fryer before you start. another way to pre heat, for the first pour you can do without pins and leave them in for a minute that will get it hot. after that you can pull pins out and open and tap them out. pins would be 100% faster than drilling each hole in the sinker. also you can get your mold too hot. if your sinkers arent poping out blacking them with a candel will help a little. read here http://www.catfish1.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=456
     
  6. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Take your pull pins to a welders supply store. You can get brass rods of the same diameter fairly cheap. Of course, as you said, you can use a coat hanger, but my personal preference is brass. You can make up 25 to 30 pull pins (or even more) and pour a bunch of the weights before you even start removing the pins. Being cheap, er, frugal, I use an old can of motor oil...you know the bottom of the container which doesn't make it into the lawn mower. Pam is too valuable. LOL
     
  7. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    Also I might add is, I've seen videos of guys pouring lead using Parafin Wax as a slag collector to take out the impurities of the lead before pouring the lead into the mold. Just add the wax and scrap it off with an old spoon, before pouring. I've never poured my own weights yet, but definently want too. I have access to lead, that we use in our foundry business for our Gravel Pump bases..
     
  8. katfish ken

    katfish ken New Member

    Messages:
    4,092
    State:
    Paintsvill
    You can smoke your pull pins and mold with a candle.Light the candle and hold the mold/pull pins just at the top of the flame, the mold will turn black with suet. This is the best release agent I have found.
    The diameter of your pull pins are 3/32 if I remember correctly. I made some replacement pins for some that had bent. I made mine out of mild steel welding rods.
    You can warm your mold by opening it and laying it across your melting pot if the pot is not to big. Hope this helps. You can PM me with any more questions if you like.
     
  9. Catfish Fever

    Catfish Fever New Member

    Messages:
    4,548
    State:
    Wside, Mil
    Steve, when I pour, I let the first couple of pours in the mold for a couple of minute, to let the molds heat up. When I first started pouring, I use the candle blackning method, the waxs and that stuff. You let the molds warm up, none of that is necessary (imo). I just let'em warm up, you'll get a good pour and ripple free sinkers.:wink:
     
  10. Katatonik

    Katatonik New Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    State:
    Ogden, Kansas,
    I enjoyed watching the experts work at the lead pour and I have to agree
    the Pam spray on the pins worked really well. They gave me the job of
    greasing the pins when I pitched in. I think it was because I couldn't
    screw it up. I dumped a lump of slag in the pot without thinking about it,
    should have hunted for another bar of lead. Shows how braindead you
    can be after a half hour or so of really quick, simple movements. We were
    moving pretty well after a while. Lotsa sinkers poured!
     
  11. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    Be prepared for some frustration.:wink: When you first start pourin it takes awhile to get in the groove.:smile2:
    Where did you come across some lead?
     
  12. Snagged2

    Snagged2 New Member

    Messages:
    6,252
    State:
    Verde Valley AZ
    I used to cast a lot of pistol bullets, and when I'd get my pot full of my elements,, I'd throw in a chunk ,small, of candle wax, it'd start smokin, and I'd light that smoke and it'd burn off, leaving a nice shiny pot of lead,, any slag or impurities would be floating, and I could ladle them out..
    After you get going on the casting, the problem more than likely won't be keeping your molds hot, but, keeping them cool enough to handle..!!
    I've never really cared if the weights were wrinkled,,,cold,,,, or,,, frosty,, too hot,, they're just fishing weights...., if they hold, and work,, ,, I'm good
     
  13. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    I use to use the turkey fryer too but I now use a plug in single burner now. They are only $10 and it was just easier for me to maintain a steady heat temp. Propane can be a pain outside if there is a breeze.

    Like some of these guys I just pour a few sets to get the mold heated up. I also prefer sooting my molds and pins. I can cast a few hundred sinkers easily without constantly using a spray on them. I just oil the hinge after every use and I'm good to go.

    Last advice I can give is to make sure you keep your ladle sooted and hot too ( if you use one ) . Lead will cool fast from the pot to the mold if the ladle isn't heated, causing some molds to clog up preventing a solid pour.
     
  14. Plowboy411

    Plowboy411 New Member

    Messages:
    918
    State:
    Georgia
    the way I preheat my mold is to make my first 1 or 2 pores, pull the pin and lit the lead sit for a few seconds and put the lead back in the pot.
    this heats the mold and I'm good to go.
     
  15. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    I too use a hot plate pan and ladle cheep and effective, but can be aggravating if like you said the lead isnt hot enough thus use #2 of the bottle tourch i mentioned in my other post. i use to get soo mad when they wouldnt pour and couldnt figure out why, duh it wasnt hot enough. now i scoop up a ladle full with it still sitting in the pan i run the tourch over the top of the lead in the ladle for a few seconds and wow what a differance no half pours and few if any wrinkels:big_smile: also make shure there isnt any gunk on the pour spout of the ladle, quick flick of the tourch.

    the only problem i have with not getting a perfect sinker every time is around just the bottom hole, (fat part of no roll) will some -half the time wrinkle, witch of course is the only place i dont want to see wrinkles (wer the line goes). any thoughts? may it be that the pins need to be hot too?
     
  16. john catfish young

    john catfish young New Member

    Messages:
    3,070
    State:
    Kentucky
    I just poured my first sinkers the other day and was impressed with the speed and quality of my first pour. I use mainly 3 oz bank sinkers and poured 245 sinkers in just a few hours. I'm not familiar with the molds that need pins or rods....but the Do-It molds are top quality and I didnt need to do anything to them. Just melted my lead and poured after skimming off the top. I gave about 60 sinkers away to friends and still have 185 (3 oz) sinkers. These will last me a long time I think. I've been giving almost .60 cents a piece and just saved myself nearly $150.:cool2:
     
  17. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    I don't use that exact mold but yes, if you have any wrinkles at all that is from something not being hot enough.

    If you put the ladle back in the pot after each pour it stays really hot and you wont need the torch ; ) and it will speed you up a lot.

    g'luck and be carefull
     
  18. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Pouring sinkers that large, or larger, you shouldn't have to worry about the mold cooling off, unless you're doing a lot of fooling around between pours. Personally, I have the opposite problem; the mold gets so hot that it starts taking forever for the lead to solidify. When that happens, I switch to another mold and make some different sinkers for a while, till the first mold cools down enough (which is still very hot).
    When you pour, immediately return your ladle to the pot and watch the surface of the melted lead in the 'funnel' part of the mold; it will get a glazed over look when it solidifies. Then you can pull pins and dump the sinkers out of the mold.
     
  19. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    yea i do that to. i think the problem is my hot plate doesnt have the juice to heat up my 8' cast iron pan FULL of lead, half full it does ok making the smaller sinkers but to make the big weights it takes a pan full. if id bipass the overheat protection sensor so it would stay on high constiantly without shutting off (like my brother n law did) it would probally do alot better. i made over a hundred no rolls of all sizes (3-8) yesterday, and it kept kicking off and on but after i got half way down the pan the lead would stay hot enough to pour good.
     
  20. Catfish Fever

    Catfish Fever New Member

    Messages:
    4,548
    State:
    Wside, Mil
    Ray, that's a good idea with the Pam, never seen that one. What I do for my pins, I bought a cheap "wax ring" for setting a commode, melted it in a small can, after I pull my pins, just dip them in the wax, hang them on the side of the can till I'm ready for the next pour.
    I'm still on the first ring after a lot of sinkers. Just got me a pencil sinker mold on ebay for 36 bucks on ebay, used once.