Launching Boat Alone

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by Gordhawk, Jul 5, 2007.

  1. Gordhawk

    Gordhawk New Member

    Messages:
    1,378
    State:
    Iowa
    Can anyone give me any tips on putting a boat in and taking out of the water by yourself? I'm curious to see if anyone has any tips they can give me to make this job easier. Any info on this subject would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank You,
    Glenn
     
  2. MRR

    MRR New Member

    Messages:
    4,947
    State:
    Louisiana,Mo.
    I unload mine pretty much by myself.What I do is get it ready to put in the water with a rope 6-8 ft longer than the boat tied on the front of the boat.I then tie the rope to the front of the trailerback into water boat comes off ,pull trailer out of water ,boat will followto edge of water or to ramp.get out tie up boat, park trailer get in boat and enjoy nature at it's finest.Thats my way of doing it.
     

  3. ps72103

    ps72103 New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    Arkansas
    That's what i do and just pull up slow and for loading i back the trailer about half way in to the water and run the boat as far as i can just leave a couple feet of winch strap out. i also let my tailgate down on the truck it helps when backing down steep ramps. Just what ever you do do not hook the rope to your winch strap i found out the hard way.



    any day fishing is a good day
     
  4. Big Sam

    Big Sam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,349
    State:
    Booneville AR
    Name:
    Sam
    I have a about a 20 ft rope with Big dog snaps on each end. I snap one on my front cleet of the boat and the other to the truck not the trailer. It wont get tangled that way and back her in. On loading in the winter i have some hip waders and push the boat back and use my 20ft rope to pull her up on the trailer. :tounge_out: It works well for me:big_smile:
     
  5. Cheez

    Cheez New Member

    Messages:
    522
    State:
    Trion,GA
    I probably do it differently than most but I have tried the rope and the winch and don't like either method. The way I do it is to unhook the back and leave the front hooked. Then I back in untill the boat floats up just slightly. This will get your trailer bunks wet and make it easy to drive off. Then pull out just a little and get into the boat and unhook the front. Start the motor and back off the trailer, pull up to the dock and tie off and go park your vehicle.
    There is a sweet spot where the boat comes off easy. You will have to find it but it's not hard.

    Cheez
     
  6. solomon

    solomon New Member

    Messages:
    735
    State:
    MS
    I tie a rope on my front cleat and hook it to my truck, but I use enough rope to get it all the way off the trailer and stay hooked to the truck. That way I can let it float off and pull it back up and tie it off without having to get my feet wet.
     
  7. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    No matter what the drill, either knee boots or hip boots will make it go much easier (and drier).
     
  8. Gordhawk

    Gordhawk New Member

    Messages:
    1,378
    State:
    Iowa
    Thanks,to each and every one of you that contributed to this thread. I've picked up several helpful tips that I'm definitely going to try.
     
  9. ka_c4_boom

    ka_c4_boom New Member

    Messages:
    2,252
    State:
    Bedford,Ky
    i due the following : back down the ramp stop before i reach the water put in plug remove rear strap attatch fish finder hook up battery back in the water till rear of boat floats get in the boat unhook front start boat back off the trailor beach boat park truck

    when i return i back the trailor in till runner boards are wet then pull up till one foot of boards are still in the water and drive the boat up on the trailor as far as the moter will push it then use the winch to do the rest
     
  10. jsharper

    jsharper New Member

    Messages:
    293
    State:
    TX
    I pretty much do it like the others. I loop the rope over the winch pole on the trailer, back in until I see the back of the boat float, hit the brakes, the boat slides off. Pull the trl up a little. I then pull my boat out of the way and tie it off. If nothing is available, I put an anchor on the front rope and toss that on the bank. On loading, it is just learning the slope of the ramp and not getting the trailer in so deep the boat floats to much. I then climb onto the toungue of the trl and into the back of the truck, out over the side. I don't even get wet most of thetime, anymore. I have only been boating a couple of years, but this works for me.

    Jim
     
  11. fordman49450

    fordman49450 New Member

    Messages:
    30
    State:
    Michigan
    my biggest problem is loading the boat afterwards, I dont really like driving on the boat, it just bothers me. I do the rope tied to the truck process when unloading, but now I just decided to get a pair of water shoes since I wear shorts and load the boat while standing in the water.
     
  12. tkishkape

    tkishkape New Member

    Messages:
    782
    State:
    Gore, Okla
    That same method works for me with a 20 foot bay boat.

    You must prepare the boat for launch before approaching the ramp by:
    1. untie the boat from the trailer both stern and bow.
    2. tie the tending line to the trailer, and then to the boat.
    3. PUT IN THE PLUG
    4. back down the ramp until the boat just begins to float off the trailer.
    5. drive slowly forward out from under the boat to the edge of the ramp
    6. untie tending line from trailer and retie it to dock fixture
    7. park and lock truck and trailer
    8. untie boat from shore fixture
    9. go fishing.
    To load the boat, reverse the procedure from 8 to 6.
    1. Back the trailer onto the ramp until 1/4 of the bunk remain exposed above water
    2. drive boat onto trailer, centering the keel on the trailer. Use the engine to drive the boat completely into the roller.
    3. Kill engine and trim up if you have power trim
    4. Exit boat, attach winchline to eye and tighten, adjusting as necessary.
    5. Drive towing vehicle and trailer to preparation area to clear the ramp
    6. clamp down stern and prepare boat for travel.
     
  13. cat tamer

    cat tamer New Member

    Messages:
    694
    State:
    MO
    This is exactly how I do it and it goes so smooth.
     
  14. wirehead80

    wirehead80 New Member

    Messages:
    17
    State:
    Michigan
    Thats the WORST thing you can do!! :angry: Its called power loading and causes alot of prop wash. It tears up the docks that everyone uses. If you cant get the boat on the trailer by floating it then use the winch!! Thats why its there.
     
  15. Ictalurus Punctatus

    Ictalurus Punctatus New Member

    Messages:
    353
    State:
    Greensboro, NC
    How good are you at throwing dock line? The ramp I usually launch from has a dock between the two ramps that is pretty close to the ramp. I unhook the transom straps then back the boat down until it starts to float off of the trailer. Then I get out and get on the boat; there I unhook the winch from the bow and them go to the stern. I tie a dock line (I have a 50' piece of 3/8" that I use) to my rear cleat, leave 4-5' of line hanging loose between the cleat and my right hand, I coil the rest of it up in my right hand. Then I pull off about 3-4' and hold the end of the rope in my left hand. With a side-arm type I throw over the nearest dock cleat with the coiled rope in my right hand and hang on to the piece in my left hand. What I have then created is a 50' loop which is attached to my boat on one end and in my left hand on the other, with a dock cleat inside that loop. Simply pull on the end of rope in my left hand and the boat draws straight toward the dock. Once at the dock, I tie off with a double clove hitch and go park the truck.

    I know that it sounds incredibly involved, but I promise you, it's brutally effecient. Throwing the line took me a bit of practice (actually lasoing the dock cleat took the practice) but it's nothing that 20 minutes of throwing at a Mt Dew bottle in the backyard won't nearly prefect though.

    As for loading, I do it the same as the other guys here. Aim for the trailer hitch, go 'til it sides to a stop on the bunks, them winch it the rest of the way up

    Hope this helps

    Jon
     
  16. cat tamer

    cat tamer New Member

    Messages:
    694
    State:
    MO
    It easy to see you have not loaded a boat of any size on to a trailer with a cross current. if you put your trailer deep enough to shut the motor off and float it on and then run up to the front and hook your winch strap you find your self 100 yards down river. not everyone has ideal trailer loading conditions.


     
  17. tkishkape

    tkishkape New Member

    Messages:
    782
    State:
    Gore, Okla
    You know, wirehead... you're right. When I'm on a lake, I use the winch.

    When I'm on the Arkansas River (which is most of the time), the current forces me to "power load" in order to get and keep the boat on the trailer.

    Here on the Arkansas River, "Power Loading" is how it's done.

    Generally, we don't have the pleasure of a courtesy dock on the river... floods have a tendancy to remove them. The banks are chunk rock, making a beaching effort a moot question.

    The only thing I'm guilty of tearing up so far has been my trailer, the roller and the lower unit. (The current caused the bow to miss the roller):embarassed:
     
  18. tkishkape

    tkishkape New Member

    Messages:
    782
    State:
    Gore, Okla
    Wirehead... I owe you an apology. Aparently "Power Loading" can and does cause damage at the ramp on a lake. Now I know why I backed off the end of the ramp last year...

    Here is a movie clip showing what's wrong with "Power Loading".

    http://www.boat-ed.com/images/animations/powerloading.html

    Somehow, I just don't see the same results as the clip when loading up in a high cross-current area.
     
  19. Pogo

    Pogo New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    North Carolina
    I just posted my way of handling a trailered boat alone. I do most of my activities alone and have for decades and boat launch/recovery can be a tough job alone.

    I came upon this idea while still in knee pants and, although it requires a small (easy) trailer mod, it's nearly foolproof even under pretty severe conditions.

    Additionally, I heartily dislike driving my boat onto the trailer, particularly on a steep ramp. Leaving the engine running and in gear to hold position while I connect the winch line just doesn't appeal to me in the least.

    I'd much rather get the bow into the guides or onto the aft bunk end/aft roller and winch the boat the rest of the way.

    Anyway ... my post represents my thoughts on the matter ...