Larry's Dough Bait

Discussion in 'Homemade baits' started by kyredneck, Dec 28, 2006.

  1. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    Right off the bat I want yall to know that, IMO, nothing beats live bait, period. But when sustaining a prolonged fishing operation like a couple of trotlines in the river mid-summer thru fall, live bait is not always feasible economically or practically for most of us, and in the stagnant low water river conditions of dog days a good scent bait can actually outperform live bait.

    That being said, I’d like to share my homemade recipe that I’ve used only as a slow release, long lasting bait for trotlining. But I can see no reason why this wouldn’t also make a good fast release bait for rod & reel simply by omitting the cooking process. It is a dough bait and the finished raw dough is very tough and stretchy and should stay on the hook very well. Instead of forming into doughballs, I roll the finished dough out flat and slice the baits into small (¼” x ½” x ½”) dumplings, poke a hole for the hook in each one, and drop into boiling water for 2-3 minutes. This recipe will make approximately 300 of these dumplings.

    This is not an instant or quick recipe, so it’s not for everyone. It requires 2-4 weeks (depending on temperatures) to produce the best results. This is all the more reason to mass produce and freeze the surplus. It has proven to be a dependable staple for trotlining that consistantly catches channel cats, smallmouth buffalo suckers, and others. It is not a stink bait, but it does have a unique odor which is neither repulsive nor foul to most people.

    Also, this recipe doesn’t seem to be overly attractive to carp (which, to me, is a desireable quality as a trotline bait). To target carp and buffalo omit the sardines, garlic & onion powders, and add ½ to 1 whole bottle real vanilla after combining the Brown Stuff with the Green Stuff (just don’t make the vanilla overpowering).
    _______________________________________________________
    Ingredients:
    BROWN STUFF (souring process)
    (1) 15.25 oz can corn
    1 to 1.5 cups cottonseed meal, not hulls (approximate; and absolutely essential, imo)
    1 cup molasses (approximate; I use stock grade deer molasses from the hunting store)

    GREEN STUFF
    (1) 13.5 oz can spinach
    (1) can sardines (in oil or water)
    1.25 oz garlic powder (1/2 bottle)
    1.25 oz onion powder
    [optional; 1-2 dozen catalpa worms (I added for the first time last batch w/outstanding results)]
    FLOUR
    3 lbs plain white flour (approximate)
    _________________________________________________________
    Preparation: BROWN STUFF; drop cottonseed meal in blender and chop into a powder, remove; puree corn in blender and add molasses and then the cottonseed powder, blend all together, add a little water if needed, looking for consistency of tomato sauce; put in jar and cover with cloth, set it outside to sour for 2-4 wks.

    The grainy essence derived from the soured corn/cottonseed/sorghum combo is the heart and soul of this recipe. The souring process is also why it takes so long to make; kinda like making good wine or beer except you don’t add yeast, let the bacteria & wild yeasts in your locale do their thing. The cottonseed meal may not be readily available to some, but your local feed store should be able to order it for you. As stated previously, I consider the cottonseed meal essential to this recipe.

    Preparation: GREEN STUFF; when brown stuff is soured and you’re ready to make the dough, puree the green stuff ingredients together in a blender; use fresh, DO NOT SOUR.

    Preparation: DOUGH; combine brown stuff with green stuff in large bowl and mix well, begin adding in flour and stir & stir and mix & mix and knead & knead (this is the most laborious part) until you have a dough the consistency like mom’s bread dough, it should not stick to your hands or the board when it’s ready, you’ll begin to think that you’re never gonna get there, take a break if you have to; seal dough in plastic bag to prevent drying out and let it sit at room temperature for 2-3 days to allow the “whole lump to leaven” with the various scents of the ingredients.

    This can be frozen until you’re ready to use it. If you choose to make boilies from it, just remember, don’t over cook. Drop the dough balls (or dumplings) into boiling water a few at a time, when they float they’re about 30-60 seconds from done. Also, they’ll stick to the bottom of the pan so you’ll need a spatula to gently scrape them loose so they can float. After cooking, spread them out on trays and allow the the outside to dry (the sun makes short work of this), just don't over dry. Dumplings will actually have a leathery quality when dryed right. I vacuum pack and freeze surplus baits.
     
  2. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    I forgot to mention that the boilies from this recipe will stay a trotline hook for 3-4 days in slight river current, probably longer in little or no current.
     

  3. neocats

    neocats New Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    State:
    Steubenvil
    You should try marketing your recipe.
     
  4. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    Well, this recipe has been evolving for about 4 yrs now, and I'm still tweeking it. What I want now is to somehow omit the cooking process and still have a long lasting bait for trotlines. Something that you would form on the hook like Charlie's Blood Bait B. I've a couple of binders in mind that I'm gonna try. Don't know if I'll still need the flour or not. It's the gluten in the flour that binds this together as is.
     
  5. suggy183

    suggy183 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    NE
    [Thanks I might just try it
     
  6. mwmuck

    mwmuck New Member

    Messages:
    15
    State:
    Texas
    kyredneck,

    The "brown stuff" recipe sounds a lot like a smelly mixture that my grandpa used to squish together. He used cottonseed cake instead of meal because it already had the molasses in it and just soaked it and by the time it softened up it was smelled up. He would mash that up with a box of 40% Bran Flakes breakfast cereal which got really sticky. Some folks use cattails as binders, some use lint outta the dryer. I used to roll up a bunch of the dough and then shake the balls in a sack full of flour and then leave them for a few hours in the flour. It will coat the balls and form a coating that will also keep the smelly stuff off your hands later on when you are baiting up.
     
  7. fishoholic

    fishoholic New Member

    Messages:
    27
    State:
    California
    That sounds like a great recipe.
     
  8. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    I’ve attached some photos here to illustrate how we form our ‘dumplings’ for trotlining. Roll the dough out flat, slice into cubes (or dumplings), poke a hole in each one (for the hook), boil, drop into icewater (thanks ShiloRed), drain, and then sun dry. The finished product is a long lasting, slow release bait that will consistantly catch channel cats and buffalo suckers.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. GATOR744

    GATOR744 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    State:
    PA
    Thanks for the info going fishing on sat. wanted to try something new looks like I give this a go.:big_smile:
     
  10. dust777man

    dust777man New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    SC
    Gonna have to try this one. Looks like it might work .
     
  11. alands94

    alands94 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,706
    State:
    Lebanon, I
    Thanks for the recipe. I prefer fresh or live bait as well, but it is always fun to try my own concoctions.
     
  12. smith11

    smith11 New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    virginia
    thanks for the recipes
     
  13. CarDealDan

    CarDealDan New Member

    Messages:
    8
    State:
    Tennessee
    Thanks, I'm gonna give this a try
     
  14. cat tamer

    cat tamer New Member

    Messages:
    694
    State:
    MO
    I have been looking for a new channel bait recipe, Thank You for posting it.