Lakes are low, time to build structure

Discussion in 'LOCAL TENNESSEE TALK' started by otalldon, Jan 16, 2010.

  1. otalldon

    otalldon New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    tennessee
    Lakes are low now, know the Hill is probably as low as it's going to be for the year. Talked to a guy several years ago who goes around the lake with some buddies and builds structure on the banks with debri on the banks, old trees and rock. My uncles used to cut cedar trees and sink them close to the banks. Sometimes they would even sink hay bails. They thought it gave the crappie somewhere to go to, but it brings all fish in. I don't cut cedar or sink hay bails, but there is always dead trees and rocks to use to build fish structure. I have done this and it does seem to help the fishing where I go. Do any of you guys do this?
     
  2. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    If ya have an old jon boat you're not worrying about cluttering up, it's a good time to put structure out invisible to other fishermen. Others can't see it, it'll be in deeper water, and it will be effective during other seasons than spring. We used to sink stake beds made from old pallets and tomato stakes. Another tip is to use fruit tree cuttings, apple, peach, cherry, plum, etc. They contain a sap that draws minnows immediately after it is sunk. Cedar trees make very good cover, but they need to be put in bunches of at least 3 to be more effective. And the sap from cedar trees will repel fish for a while until the turpentine like substance in the sap detioriorates. Cedar trees last a long time, it just takes them awhile to work unless they are already "aged."
     

  3. TnRivershark

    TnRivershark New Member

    Messages:
    1,254
    State:
    M,boro Tn.
    The new thing is to take a 5 gal bucket with some concrete in it and stand multipule pieces of PVC up in the bucket too make your stake bed. It makes good cover for the fish and your hooks do not snag on the pvc.
     
  4. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    That's a good idea. And the bucket filled with concrete makes them much easier to sink.
     
  5. otalldon

    otalldon New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    tennessee
    Catching largemouths and smallmouths on center hill is challenging, Kentuckys are everywhere, fairly easy to catch. Talked to one of those guys from around here who was very good at catching the big largemouths on the hill one day in a bait shop and apparently the secret was finding offshore structure and the reason he had all these good spots were they were spots he created with his buddies he fishes with. He was telling me about how important it was to give the fish structure, else they would just sit in the deeper water chasing the shad schools. This same structure is of course home to some big cats. My only problem is I don't have a boat, but have a good place I have been catching bass on for years now. Have not really fished much for cats since I just recently got the cat itch. But expect to have alot of luck on these same spots on the bank I have been fishing on since I have been setting up rock piles and sinking logs there ever since I have lived up here and it has paid off. Always do well here.Now just gotta take advantage of the cats I am sure here.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2010
  6. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    Yeah, we used to put our structure where it couldn't be seen unless you had a boat with a depthfinder, but leave it near shore enough where it could be reached with a long cast from the bank. We had 4 of these honey holes. What we would do was go trim my mother's apple, pear, and peach trees, get a truckload of cuttings, then sink them. Actually it's best to put these where there isn't any natural structure already.

    On a good day starting about late February, I'd go fish these areas from the bank, even though at the time I had a boat. I'd usually get a mixed bag of largemouth, smallmouth, catfish, crappie, and maybe even some yellow perch and sauger. These were in anywhere from 8' to 14' of water when the lake was low, Then after the lake was elevated in the spring, they would be 4', 5', 6' or even more deeper. I liked minnow and shiner fishing these spots with a slip float. With a medium light spinning rod, it's easy to fish deep from the bank.

     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2010
  7. TennesseeJugger

    TennesseeJugger New Member

    Messages:
    2,029
    State:
    Watertown, Tenn

    I have a boat and can travel, I live in Watertown so I am not far from CenterHill. You ever want to go out in a boat just let me know and I am there.
     
  8. otalldon

    otalldon New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    tennessee
    Hey Don, sent you a message, look forward to going with you.