Lake Suguma

Discussion in 'IOWA LAKES / RESERVOIRS TALK' started by Wolfdog, May 3, 2008.

  1. Wolfdog

    Wolfdog New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    Iowa
    Any one know anything about the Virus that has hit the bass in the lake? I live around it and just hearing about it. Supose to kill the bass but the one's you catch are safe to eat. IS this true ?
     
  2. Wolfdog

    Wolfdog New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    Iowa
    I found this and it was done in 2005.

    Just goes to show that you have watch what you are told.



    MORAVIA - The presence of largemouth bass virus (LMBV) was confirmed in Lake Sugema by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service La Cross Fish Health Lab iLa Cross Wis. Mark Flammang, fisheries management biologist with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources stationed at Lake Rathbun, investigated a report of dead and dying fish oAug. 3.

    "We were seeing only dead largemouth bass. No dead walleyes or other species which is unusual if the kill was caused solely by low oxygen conditions, so we had to look for something else," Flammang said. He said many of the dead largemouth bass were longer tha15 inches and the numbers were ithe hundreds. Flammang submitted fish for analysis on Aug. 9 and received the confirmatiooAug. 15.

    Largemouth bass virus was first detected at the Santee-Cooper Reservoir iSouth Carolina i1995 and has beeaissue for states ithe south. It has since beefound iat least 23 other states, including Iowa in 2002, wheit was confirmed iPools 10 and 11 of the Mississippi River.

    Flammang said LMBV is a short-term issue for a lake and once the virus is present it becomes part of the ecosystem and a tool for natural selection. Subsequent outbreaks impact fewer fish thathe initial one.

    "The virus is ithe water and only affects largemouth bass. However, other fish species cabe carriers," Flammang said. "None of these fish have obvious signs that they have the virus. Some largemouth bass that carry the virus may have red sores, but this is caused by secondary infections and is not directly related to the virus."

    As for the questioare the fish safe to eat, he said anglers should use their best judgement. "Cook the fish thoroughly," he said. "The fish are safe to consume, but you probably should avoid eating sick or dying fish or animals of any species. The virus is not transferable to warm-blooded animals. This includes humans."

    As is the case with most viruses, Flammang said there is not a lot that cabe done once LMBV is present ia lake. How the virus arrived is difficult to say, but Flammang said a number of conditions at Lake Sugema caused a lot of stress to the fish population, and that stress camake fish more vulnerable to virus.

    Sugema had a massive growth of curly leaf pond weed, which is a fairly commoexotic species imany Iowa lakes that dies off naturally when the water temperature reaches 70 degrees. This decaying vegetation directly removes oxygefrom the water and provides a large pulse of nutrients that calead to aalgae bloom.

    Calm and cloudy days caused the algae to die off which removed more oxygefrom the water. Those two factors combined with the warm lake water temperature caused aoxygesag for a few days. The oxygesag causes stress ithe fish population, especially largemouth bass, and hit larger fish the hardest. That stress is the opening the LMBV needs to impact the fish.

    Flammang said anglers cahelp prevent the spread of LMBV by handling largemouth bass gently if they are going to release them and by not moving fish from one body of water to another. Anglers are reminded that it is illegal to stock or introduce any live fish into public waters without the permissioof the director of the DNR. Anglers should also follow the rules by not releasing live bait into the water and to call the DNR if they see dead or dying fish.

    "It was pretty disheartening as aangler and as a biologist," he said. "We had the bass populatiomoving ithe directiowe wanted it." Lake Sugema has a special regulatioprotecting largemouth bass betwee12 and 18 inches ilength. Anglers caharvest largemouth bass below 12 inches and above 18 inches. He said bass fishing at the lake may be impacted immediately after the outbreak, but will bounce back and anglers are still encouraged to harvest bass less tha12 inches for consumption.

    "There is really nothing we cado about it once it enters a lake," he said. "It is now part of the system, but the impacts will level out. Over time, Mother Nature finds a way."

    For more information, contact Flammang at 641-647-2406.
     

  3. Catfish_Calvin

    Catfish_Calvin New Member

    Messages:
    863
    State:
    Nauvoo, Il
    I didnt know anything about that. Thanks for the info.
     
  4. wiskeredwarrior101

    wiskeredwarrior101 New Member

    Messages:
    70
    State:
    virginia
    first thing i thought when i saw the topic name was "best lake ever". Pritty sad that its hit the lake but If it was back in 05' then this isnt the initial case and shouldnt be a bad thing just nature taking its course. Have you noticed a difference in the fishing? Every year my family takes a trip here and we do better and better every time so i havent seen one.
     
  5. Wolfdog

    Wolfdog New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    Iowa
    I moved out of the area in 2004 and just moved back in Nov 2007. This is the frist year i have fished for a while and one of the area people told me about this like it was new . I found the story on it and found out it was 2005, the fishing seems to be great for bass, and everything elese,just thought the story would tell how it is . The lake has been busy.