lake fishing

Discussion in 'Blue Catfishing' started by catfish1083, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. catfish1083

    catfish1083 New Member

    Messages:
    724
    State:
    georgia
    i was just looking for some tips on catching blue cats in lakes.:confused2::big_smile:
     
  2. mintaka

    mintaka Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,471
    State:
    Charlotte , N.C
    Try using different baits on the same trip - they can be rather picky at times. Also if in a boat , use planer boards and troll at a slow speed.
    Regarding baits , shad , herring , bream , or any kind of cut bait has the potential to land a monster. Above all , be prepared.
    For more specific info , visit Mac Byrum's Catfish University , or any number of guides present in the community. Good Luck!!
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2009

  3. motard1

    motard1 New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    TEXAS
    Here in texas,we drift a lot. Drift main lake points,creek and river channels,humps or any typical fish holding structure. I always use a santee cooper rig. 8/0 gamakatsu circle hook. Since gizzard shad are fairly abundant,that's what I use for bait. Or,if shad are hard to find,cut blue gills work too.
    I know some people drift using the trolling motor to keep them straight,but I don't. We drift the rods off the port side. Also use drift socks to control speed and direction.
    Hope this helps.
     
  4. BassMassey

    BassMassey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,883
    State:
    Oconee
    like the previous post states drifting lakes for bluecat's is probably the most productive technique to put fish in the boat, and the santee rig is the best presentation. During cold water months I would look for balls of shad on your sonar, which usually occurs on the edge or right in the river/creek channels here. Alot of times if you can find birds feeding on the surface that means one thing.......stripers are feeding pushing shad to the surface, and you can almost count on a blue or two on the bottom of them all......
     
  5. catfishinsc

    catfishinsc New Member

    Messages:
    507
    State:
    SC
  6. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    Same here, I like to drift a lot, but I slow it down compared to summer drifting. If your drifting and see a lot of cats off, say a certain point or ledge, I would anchor off it for sure.

    Blues are funny about bait at times. I would throw everything at them, all different ways and sizes that you can.

    Lots of good info on here already,,,,g'luck.

    -Jim-
     
  7. cathog

    cathog New Member

    Messages:
    855
    State:
    Lone Oak Texas
    I agree on the drifting, but dont overlook anchoring on the blue super highways. When you find a place that you know blues travel to feed, anchor up on it and cast out as far as you can from the boat. When the big ones come in, a lot of the time they come in packs like wolves. You might get a double or triple on of big fish. This can be one of the most exciting things you have ever had happen( a double or triple of 30 to 50 pounders or bigger).

    I like to keep my drifting speeds around .5 mph, but dont get discouraged if you cant drift any slower than .7, I have caught many big blues in the dead of winter drifting this fast. I dont necessarily look for bait when drifting, I look for bottom stucture that holds fish. If you find bait in these areas look for busted up bait pods instead of big schools, that means something is feeding on them. Find the way your boat drifts the best and drift that way, you can use your trolling motor to keep things lined up. Middle rods should be out the farthest and the outside rods closer. This helps keep things from getting all tangled up when you have a biggun on. I could go on and on, just PM me if you have any more questions.
     
  8. catfish1083

    catfish1083 New Member

    Messages:
    724
    State:
    georgia
    thank all of yall. i am new to the drifting thing i have only been at it a few months i have managed some nice channels though.:big_smile:
     
  9. Catfish_Scooter

    Catfish_Scooter New Member

    Messages:
    2,055
    State:
    Tennessee
    Cut skipjack heads around sharp channel bends, and structure. Hope this helps. Keep in mind to fish DEEP water, that's a primary target for blues.
     
  10. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,112
    State:
    evansville
    whats the biggest blue you have caught like this aj??:eek:oooh:
     
  11. Bullheaded

    Bullheaded Member

    Messages:
    122
    State:
    Norman Ok
    This time of year should I straight line my poles down while drifting to keep my bait suspended?
     
  12. katsandsuds

    katsandsuds New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    North Caro
    Depends... as always.

    I always target different depths, either with suspended down lines or with slip bobbers. If I am fishing shallow water, I will use slip bobbers because I think the boat will scare fish in shallow water, and I don't seem to do well with down lines in water less then 20 feet deep. If I am in deep water then I will use down lines more. Most of my bait will be on the bottom this time of year, but I always have 2 or 3 lines at different depths. I try to let the fish tell me where they are and what type of bait they want that day, and adjust from there.

    There is different ways to drift, drag, troll, whatever you want to call it, it is accomplishing the same thing. The two most common ways are either to use the wind, or use your trolling motor. I perfer the trolling motor becasue it gives me more control over where I am placing the bait. I use this when I know the area well and I have specific structure I am targeting. If I am on a new lake or in a new area and want to look at the bottom while I fish, or there is structure and the wind is right, I will use the wind. Drift socks are a must here, something to slow you down and keep you lined up. The biggest thing here is to use the wind in your favor and a sec of planning when you begin to drift as far as boat position, targeted structure or bait, and how long or short the drift is. When I first started drifting, I was bad about getting too close to the target zone when I started the drift, and I would not have all the rods out and be prepared by the time I hit it, or I would start the drift too close to a bank and after 10 mins, I would be pulling everything in and starting over.