knowing your river like your home

Discussion in 'Channel Catfish' started by katkiller77, Jan 2, 2008.

  1. katkiller77

    katkiller77 New Member

    Messages:
    1,549
    State:
    dayton ohio
    I am not an expert on cat fishing but i hope this helps out. One main thing for any successful cat fishing especially channels cats knowing your river like your home. one scouting out the river early in the spring finding places where structure is logs jams, timber, rocks concrete pillions of bridges. river curves. also get to know where feeder river and creeks flows into the river your fish. also find out where low dams and bridges are. sand bars gravel bars places where the current is fast and slow. what type of bait fish in prevalent in the river your fish. also find out the backwater areas are also slough backbays even oxbow lakes. happy channeling:smile2:
     
  2. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Also need to know where the mussel beds are also. Both Blues and Channels feed on them. And most times there not far from one.
    Also any small thing will sure hold them also.
    And in spring look for the spawning banks. Here on the Tn river that is clay and wood. That causes fun fun.. The channels will stack up on the clay banks and get ready to spawn. I catch them in 2ft of water.
    Pete
     

  3. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Nice post guys thanks for sharing
     
  4. CatfishCarpenter

    CatfishCarpenter New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    Indiana
    I've been catfishing the Tippicanoe for years. Every year though,I launch way upriver and float down (and of course I gotta chuck some spinners for the Pike). I do this to see what's been goin on for the last 4-5 mos. Just because there was an awesome snag somewhere last year, doesn't mean it's gonna be there this year. A river (scientifically) actually tries to straighten itself out. The Tippi floods at least once a year. Trees fall, snags move downriver and pile up on bridge pilings causing currents to make new habitats.
     
  5. dookiechrist

    dookiechrist New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    utah
    hi guys again, i am somewhat new to catfishin, dont know exactly where to look or what to use, and i'm having a great time learning. but then again thats part of the fun right, finding out. the thrill of the chase so-to-speak
     
  6. katkiller77

    katkiller77 New Member

    Messages:
    1,549
    State:
    dayton ohio
    another thing try to get a topographical map of the river you are fishing from your local dnr or conservancy group that manages the river you fish. they will usually give you listing of where bridges are low dams parks and what not. not to mention how to get there and every bend of curve in the river. :big_smile:
     
  7. Plowboy411

    Plowboy411 New Member

    Messages:
    918
    State:
    Georgia
    This is some good info,thanks.:wink:
     
  8. newtothegame2

    newtothegame2 New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    hudson wisconsin
    heck yes, topomaps are my fav allong wth local info. but getting a topo map will help extremly because you can see where brdges are and some even show what the bottom is ie gravel,mud,rock whetever and it shows breaks and bends and backwaters and bays. topos are my favorite
     
  9. catfishcrazy256

    catfishcrazy256 New Member

    Messages:
    2,648
    State:
    Indiana
    sounds like some good info !!!!!!!!