Knowing Different Baits .

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by catfisherman369, Jul 11, 2009.

  1. catfisherman369

    catfisherman369 Floyd

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    Nashville Il.
    Dozens of different bait types are commonly used for catfish, with popular picks ranging from hot dog slices to clams to smaller catfish. If one were to dig into occasional uses, the list of items might be endless .

    Of course, different species and sizes of cats prefer different kinds of meals, and some offerings lend themselves better to specific styles of catfishing than do others. Also, catfish are just like other kinds of fish -- and people for that matter -- in the sense that their preferences vary from day to day. One day's hot bait commonly may not yield much the next day, with no obvious change in conditions. With that in mind, you are wise to set the table with at least a couple of different kinds of baits and allow the cats to dictate their preferences.

    Catching any kind of fish begins with putting baits where the fish are. That simple fact acknowledged, an angler's offerings also must appeal to the fish. For many species of game fish, lure sizes, shapes, movements and colors, and types of presentations all figure prominently into the equation of making an offering appealing. For catfish, which feed mostly by smell and taste, it is all about using the right kind of bait.

    Maybe between all of us here on the B.O.C. can list a bait or two that they have used and the types of presentations they used with that named bait . For example : When targeting Channel cats I use secret 7 dip bait carolina rigged with a loopers rig .

    Just a thought to hear and learn all about different baits and how to rig it .
     
  2. catfisherman369

    catfisherman369 Floyd

    Messages:
    4,944
    State:
    Nashville Il.
    SHAD:

    Shad make great bait in most reservoirs and many rivers, because they are prevalent natural forage and often are readily available to fishermen.

    Generally speaking, shad should be cut into chunks or strips, with the size of the pieces and the type of cut determined by the size of cats being targeted and the size of the shad. Probably the most efficient way to cut up a shad is to slice off the head and tail and cut across the body to create strips. If those pieces seem too large, the strips can then be cut in half. However, some anglers prefer to fillet large shad and cut up the fillets or to fish with very small shad, either whole or cut in half.

    Big catfish like big meals, and few things do more to improve an angler's odds of landing a true trophy cat than baiting up with a big chunk of cut shad or even a live shad. Adult flathead catfish feed almost exclusively on live fish, and shad often are an important part of the mix because they are around river channels, where flatheads spend the most time. Even channel catfish, which feed on a little bit of everything both dead and alive, turn heavily to fish diets once they get larger than 10 pounds

    Cut shad can be fished several different ways for good success. The most popular technique is to use a Carolina rig with a large enough barrel weight to keep the rig on the bottom.

    For flathead catfish, shad need to be alive and at least palm-sized . Flatheads have minimal interest in cut bait. Baits should be presented on or near the bottom around good structure and thick cover.
     

  3. catfisherman369

    catfisherman369 Floyd

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    State:
    Nashville Il.
    CHICKEN LIVERS:


    Livers typically do not produce many huge catfish. However, for channel cats up to about 10 pounds, chicken livers are extremely productive. They also are inexpensive and available from any grocery store.

    One major caveat of baiting up with chicken livers is that they initially can be difficult to keep on the hook. They toughen up once they have been in the water a few minutes. But if you are not careful, casting this bait much farther than your hook travels is common.

    Among the best ways to keep livers hooked is to use treble hooks and relatively small pieces of bait, and wrap the liver onto the hook. That allows the bait to be hooked in a few different places, and the bends of the three hooks work together to keep the offering in place. Beyond that, you simply need to make lob casts instead of fast-action snapping casts.

    Livers also tend to work best for the first 15 or 20 minutes they are on a hook. They lose a lot of their natural juices over time as well as much of their appeal. Anglers are wise, therefore, to re-bait rigs periodically and to always begin with a fresh piece of liver after moving to a new spot.

    Chicken livers work well any where channel cats or smaller blues are the main attraction and where currents are not too overpowering.

    Arguably, no bait is more closely associated with catfishing than a chicken liver. The reason is simple: livers produce catfish and lots of them. With their strong, meaty smell, chicken livers draw cats from broad areas. Once the cats find the bait, they have trouble resisting them.