Kicker Motor - Best Outboard motor for Crestliner 1860?

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by JRA, Jan 12, 2006.

  1. JRA

    JRA New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    Kentucky
    :confused: I have a Crestliner 1860 utility with a 50 hp 2 stroke Johnson (rated for an 80 hp) and am thinking about getting a small 4 stroke kicker for the boat. Does anyone have any experience with this? What do you think is the best size for this boat? I am thinking a 4 or 5 hp, but would like to go as light as I can. I am a little concerned that the kicker will make the boat sit lopsided: a 5 hp usually weighs about 55 lbs. Reasons: I fish a river with little boat traffic and in fairly unpopulated areas often by myself. I have had motor troubles before and would like to have a back-up 'get home' motor. Also, I like to troll for muskies occasionally and my 2 stroke tends to carb up on me. If anyone has any advice or experience with small kickers on aluminum utilities and jon boats, I would appreciate any help you can provide.

    Thanks,
    Jeff
     
  2. muskyman

    muskyman Active Member

    Messages:
    384
    State:
    Loudon TN
    Name:
    David
    What I would do is base your search off of the weight of the kickers out there. This way the lop sided boat thing would be dramatically cut back on. I know the 4-strokes would troll better but they will also weigh more, but todays 4-strokes are cutting back on that weight thing pretty good from what I understand.
     

  3. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,456
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Check out the Nissan and Tohatsu motors. Plenty of choices in the 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 5, hp range...W
     
  4. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I would probably go with a 2-cycle kicker, since your main motor is a 2-cycle. That would keep you from having to carry two types of gas. Are you planning to use it a lot, like in trolling, or is it just for emergency purposes?
     
  5. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Jeff,my first boat,(localy known as the Battleship)was a 16 ft.long,6 ft.wide,3 ft sides and transom oyster boat from the South carolina coast.It was built with full 1 inch thick "Heart Cypress" boards.As such.it was heavy and would sink when flooded.It had been used with a British seagull,sailboat motor.My father hauled the boat up to Santee on a lowboy trailer.He cut the transom out to 15 in.and mounted a 1 1/2 Evenrude Ranger on the back.This motor had a spring,instead of a shear pin,on the prop.A small machine screw,nuts and a little bradding at the start position,limited my speed to a good walk,yet was fast enough that the motor did not carbon up.A very small motor will push a very large and heavy boat,on a lake,with no current.I am 60 years old.I have carried a 2 hp. motor tied out of the way in my boat,most of my life.I hook up my safty chain first,then mount my motor,if and when I wish to use it.By hooking the chain first,and as short as possable,you can drop the motor and not lose it.A 16 ft.mod.V Fishier Marine,and a 16 ft.long,6 ft.wide,2 ft.side Sears john boat(both Aluminium)are the largest boats that I have pushed upstream in tidewater,the Ogeechee and Savannah rivers.It ain;t fast,but it beats paddling,or rowing.It also worked trolling.If you have a motor that uses the same gas,you can get a fitting like the one on your motor.You couple this fitting on to your fuel hose,and use your bulb to pump gas into the integral tank on your small motor.No extra,or different gas tanks.Think of it.How many trolling motors put out 2 hp.Many people mount too large a trolling motor,then have to fight the slow speed carbon build up.A lot of small motors have few hours on them and are very cheap,compared to your larger motors.It takes very little speed to troll upstream.I don;t know what size motor that you need,but I bet it is less than you think.Good luck.peewee-williams
     
  6. JRA

    JRA New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    Kentucky
    Hey Guys,

    Thanks a lot for your responses. I would probably troll mostly in the early spring when the muskies are on the shallow flats, but my main concern would be as a 'get home' motor. The river in which I fish is a lock and dam system, and the current is usually not that bad; my 42 lb bow mount TM will usually pull me upstream without any problem. In the past, when my main motor konked out, I got home with the TM, but the battery was giving out as I got to the ramp. I am still debating whether to get a small kicker, a transom mounted trolling motor (less expensive), or even just a back up battery (least expensive).

    Thanks,
    Jeff
     
  7. JRA

    JRA New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    Kentucky
    I found this web site, and it is interesting: http://www.oceanskiffjournal.com/SubscriberContent/Services/Apps/BoatHPEstimator.aspx. According to this calculator, I would need an 8 hp kicker at 75% throttle to get up to 5 mph with my boat and with only 1 person on board, which is about the average speed for muskie trolling. I was hoping that I could get by with a 3.5 hp and still be able to troll for muskies, but it doesn't seem to be the case if this calculator is accurate.

    Jeff
     
  8. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I have a 14ft.John boat that is 4ft.wide at the top,3ft.wide in the bottom.I bought it to get past the sawed off pilings of the RR trestles at low water.The bow of this boat is rounded under,not sloped.It is a lot slower than my 14 & 16ft.larger boats,with the same small gas and electric trolling motors.It does fine,once it is planed off with a 8 hp.and the bow is out the water.Hull shape has a lot to do with it.Also,you can double your horsepower,but it won,t double your speed.After a point,a planeing hull starts to bog down.That is why you can cut your motor way back,and still stay on plane,after getting there.I used my 8 hp.on my 16ft.Fisher Marine for a kicker,trolling motor.My boat worked best at about 1/4 throttle.From there on,the boat just kept bogging down with very little speed increase.I have a bare hull,and a 2 cyl.40 horse.I may only have 1/2 the weight that you do.1/4 throttle was fast enough to troll and catch Spanish and King Mackeral,Bluefish,Barracuda,Jack,ect.If the speed that you need to troll at,is a speed where your boat is bogging bad,you may need a lot of horsepower.I hope you can find what you need at the right price.Keep us informed,as we are still learning.peewee-williams
     
  9. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    JRA if you have a console steer boat then you could put it on the off side to your console and that would even out the weight.
    If it were me I would look at the Briggs and straten 5 h/p real close.
    Good little stout motors. The only draw back is they cannot stand salt water.
     
  10. Drydocked

    Drydocked New Member

    Messages:
    1
    State:
    CA
    Jeff,

    I am the publisher for the website you mentioned above. Thanks for visiting and trying the calculator. I just wanted to caution that the calculator is applicable only if you are planing the hull (I forgot to add that to the page, but will do so now). If you are running at displacement speeds, it doesn't work (overestimates the HP). So you might be able to do 5 mph with the 3.5 HP motor. What type of boat is it?

    John Loo
    Publisher, Ocean Skiff Journal
     
  11. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    I've posted several times in the past about using your main motor for trolling.

    It's the most damaging way to operate the larger motors. Aside from carbon build up in the exhaust, that type of extended operation wears out the piston skirt,(lower part of the pistons).

    The carbon build up is no longer a softer type carbon, but one that's nearly as hard as ceramic, thanks to our newly formulated gasoline.

    A carbon guard additive can prevent that, and a decarboning helps greatly. Look for Bubbacats post on that one in the repair section on marine engines.

    By all means, get a small 4 stroke if you can afford it, but whatever you decide, stay in the 10 hp range if you want it for a secondary get home motor.
     
  12. JRA

    JRA New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    Kentucky
    John,

    Thanks for your response. After some reflection, I thought that I may have been misusing the calculator. I, however, have decided not to buy the kicker and am in the process of selling my boat. I bought a new one that better meets my fishing needs at the moment.

    Thanks again all of you for you help,
    Jeff
     
  13. Creek6

    Creek6 New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    OK
    Since many outboard problems are related to the fuel system, to insure the the kicker is always available for emergency use it should operate off of a seperate fuel system.