Keeping bait cool - question about ice.

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by ravenloft420, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    ok I got some bluegill and are gonna use them tonight but its supposed be about 80 during the day so what I wanna know is, I know when tap water sits out for 24 hrs something happens to the chemicals in it and it becomes safe for fish. (correct me if Im wrong please) well I was just wondering if the ice in my freezer that has been sitting for awhile would be safe to throw in the water or was the chlorine frozen into the cubes?


    also what is the purpose of using non iodized salt? this does not kill them?
     
  2. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    Most ice is made from chlorinated water. If you can get ice made from well water I would go with that. If you can keep the bait alive, all the better, but try to use lake water to keep them in. Well water needs to be influxed with oxygen for an hour or so since it is typically depleted of dissolved oxygen.

    If you are keeping them in lake water, adding some ice to it should not be a problem.
     

  3. KScatwoman

    KScatwoman New Member

    Messages:
    13
    State:
    Wichita, KS
    You can also go to Walmart (or just about any other store with a pet department) and buy aquarium dechlorinator for about $2. That's all I use, and it does a great job of making the water safe for your baitfish. :cool2:
     
  4. loop

    loop New Member

    Messages:
    422
    State:
    Newkirk,Oklahom
    Freeze a Qt jug of water and set it in the water with the bait it will keep it cool and you don't have to worry about the fish dieing from the clorine.
    Loop
     
  5. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    hey thanks you guys they are still alive and kickin and im about ready to go out to what looks like a nice flathead hole. I changed the water about ten times yesterday at the lake before I brough them home. I added ice everyonce in a while and hooked up my bubbler to it. this morning I thought they were all dead because they were hangin out at the bottom. I reached down and grabbed one and the water was still cold and as soon as it felt my hand touch it,it went crazy and got all the other ones stirred up to. I changed the water with dechlorinater as soon as I knew they were alive.a also theres about 10 minnows missing out of there wich leads me to beleive that they cant be to stressed out or else they wouldnt be feeding.

    Ill let you guys know if I catch my first flathead soon enough..
     
  6. jdstraka

    jdstraka Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    4,739
    State:
    Council Bluffs, Iowa
    Name:
    John
    Good Info Dieter,Thank You J.D.
     
  7. riddleofsteel

    riddleofsteel New Member

    Messages:
    353
    State:
    NC
    While you are in the aquarium section pickup a cheap thermometer. That way you can monitor the temps. I keep my bait tanks at or below 70 degrees in the summer for longer bait life.
     
  8. JackieV

    JackieV New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Missouri
    You can freeze bottled water ... then just put several of them in with the fish and it keeps them cool.. and they are reuseable...
     
  9. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Riddleofsteel, that brings up a question. Most of us know that changing fish from one hot water to cold water is bad for the fish, but wouldn't the same thing apply to moving a fish from cold water (bait tank) to warm water (lake or river)? It just seems like a sudden change in temperature, either way, of 25-30 degrees would render that baitfish pretty listless. But that's supposition. Since you're actually doing it, how extreme are the temperature differences between your bait tank (70 degrees) and the waters where you are fishing, and how does an extreme change affect the baitfish.
     
  10. adamant

    adamant New Member

    Messages:
    97
    State:
    new jersey
    use the blue frozen blocks that you use in the lunch coolers..
     
  11. BigCatDreaming

    BigCatDreaming New Member

    Messages:
    263
    State:
    Illinois
    I have always just had good luck if I was going to use the gills in the same day by placing them in a freezer bag and putting them in my refrigerator. Their oils seem to really come out from being in there, especially if you take some of their scales off first.
     
  12. SilencedMajority

    SilencedMajority New Member

    Messages:
    320
    State:
    White Mtns, AZ
    Gills make excellent bait because its hard to kill them. I've thrown them in a bucket full of city water with no aerator and had them live for at least 8 hours. Plus, I've never seen a gill suffer from temperature shock like shad and other baitfish will.
     
  13. riddleofsteel

    riddleofsteel New Member

    Messages:
    353
    State:
    NC
    Most of my comments were in reference to keeping shad alive. While I do use live shad in some situations most of my shad fishing is with cut bait. The object is to keep them alive until just before use. For live bait I use more bream, bluegill and minnows than I do shad. I have never noticed any of them going thru shock once in the water but then again I am not down there watching them. I do know when I reel them in they are usually still moving pretty lively.
    I try to keep my bait tank at or below the 70's. That seems to be optimum for keeping shad and minnows alive. In the winter this is pretty close to the water in the lake. In the summer the surface temps are in the 80's or above. I do not know what the temps are deeper. I will try to drop a sinking thermometer on a string and see.