Keel and other nicks

Discussion in 'Boat Modification Journal' started by tntitans21399, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. tntitans21399

    tntitans21399 New Member

    Messages:
    82
    State:
    Tennessee
    I was wondering what everyone else has done with their boats when it started to get nicked up, mainly in the keel part?

    I am thinking about giving my old boat a paint job, do it myself, but I know I will need to patch some areas first. What is the best thing you have used?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    Have you thought about something like a keel shield or keel guard product? I have used them in the past and will in the future on fiberglass boats and they seem to do a great job.:big_smile:

    Thanks
    David
     

  3. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD
    An aluminum boat! :0a33:

    Nah, i'd say use a keel shield, or get some roll on bedliner material and make one
     
  4. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    heres what i did.

    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=38821

    lmao on an aluminum boat.

    in thanks to the b.o.c. and keelshield for winning this $200 gift i did another article in wich ive done several like this tried to give a little back to them by doing a how to. they work and will cover minor knicks and dings.
     
  5. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    You can purchase a product called marine tex that will hold up good on repairing those nicks and scratches. West marine on the net carrys it.
    Good stuff to use below and above the water line.
     
  6. zappaf19

    zappaf19 New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Monticello,IN
    I used a body putty with fiber glass in it. It has held up for 3 years now. I got from a car parts store.
    Bill
     
  7. catfishbills

    catfishbills New Member

    Messages:
    630
    State:
    Tennessee
    I use a "Hanby" its like a keel gaurd, butttttt its about 4x as thick and is gauranteed for life not to tear or wear through!:wink:
     
  8. jeepnsammys

    jeepnsammys New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    nebraska
    anything is better then nothing
     
  9. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Most damage I've seen actually comes more from unloading and loading then anything else.
    Get those trailers set up right for the boats that sit on them.
    New rollers and bunks if it needs it.
    Maybe even a wider front roller.

    Glass boats. Dont cover the problem with a keelshield. Repair the damage in a professional manner and then apply the shield.
    Any damage that breeches the gel coat down to the glass needs fixing.
    Water gets into the glass and wicks through the hull via the millions of glass strands eventually waterlogging the hull and weakening it.

    Cruise the web. You can find people in this predicament and what they have to go through to get out of it.
    Strip the hull completely, dry store the boat with fans running in the hull for MONTHS.
     
  10. Koon

    Koon New Member

    Messages:
    167
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I would have to agree... Aluminum is the way to go. Check out my attach photo, you would never take a fiberglass boat on a frozen lake. Can you believe a frozen lake in Oklahoma! Ice was 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick.
     

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  11. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    The best way to go is wood.
    Wood floats naturally, anything else sinks. The only reason you dont see many wood boats or wood cored boats until you get to the big yachts is because of the cost to produce them on an assembly line.
    Small wooden boats like we would fish from are custom built boats for the most part or either they are home built. Not many people are willing to fork out the money for a custom built boat of any material.
    We used to have a sponsor here that was producing custom built aluminum boats. I dont think he sold a one. Its expensive.

    ALOT of the big multi million dollar yachts and sportfish boats built today are built from plywood over frames. Its hard to beat the shear and lateral strengths of plywood unless you go steel. You can build lighter and stronger with wood all day long.
    Pick up a copy of Wooden Boat magazine. There are no finer boats small and large then will be found between its covers.
    There are wooden boats still afloat after 100 years on the water like the C.A. Thayer. Had the Thayer been a steel ship it would have been sold for scrap or a fishing reef instead of spending 18 million dollars in a restoration.