Jump Boxes

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by fugeman, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. fugeman

    fugeman New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    ALABAMA
    Anyone ever use jump boxes to put out trot lines?
     
  2. catman4926

    catman4926 New Member

    Messages:
    1,602
    State:
    Texas
    What is a jump box ? i have never herd that one
     

  3. fugeman

    fugeman New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    ALABAMA
    It's basically a box with around 2 inch angled out sides open on top used for setting out trot lines quick. Your hooks (50 to 100) are already baited and all you do is throw out your anchor, attach your float and drive off in a straight line and the line and hooks just come out of the box untangled, baited and ready in less than 2 minutes. Was wondering if anyone on here knew how to set them up to keep them from getting all tangled while setting them out.
     
  4. ho_shi

    ho_shi New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Texas
    never used one of them but my trot line is on a reel like a extension cord reel i tie one end off and troll to the end of the line and ties it off then go back thru and add my weights and run it one more time baitin it up, i always make sure it is snag free after the weights b4 addin bait that a way i dont get hung up somehow and end up losin half the line
     
  5. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Yeah I've used them. Made them myself.
    It ain't quite as easy as you say but its better than any other way I know.
    I always put them out one hook at a time handling each one.
    Thats the way I kept them from getting tangled.
    It was easier to put them out if they were wet.
    I don't think I could put one 50 hook line out in 2 minutes though.
    I made a shelf over my outboard and set the box on that shelf.
    I put 25 hooks out then turned the box around and put out the other 25.
    Here in Iowa if you have a boundry water sport fishing licence you can put out 200 hooks.
    I ran 4 lines with 50 hooks each.I used a piece of night crawler for bait.
    Hope this helps
    just
     
  6. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    ya im intrested in those. anything to keep em from tangeling.:wink:
     
  7. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    With the exception of getting them wet its all in how you put them in the box and keep them that way.Don't let them get jostled around.
    I put a lid on the front well platform of my jon and traveled with them in there.
    Works pretty slick.
    hope this helps
    just
     
  8. seacatfish

    seacatfish New Member

    Messages:
    319
    State:
    Florida
    IMO the easiest way to work lines is the way it is done in saltwater by every longline fisherman in every fishery in every country that participates. That is with longline clips and mono gangions (drops) and circle hooks.

    The flexibility you have when you are not tied to the line is one of the biggest blessings. You have the option of adding more drops in an area that looks good or has been producing. You can easily take the biggest fish off the line without tipping the boat or getting hooked on other drops, just unclip the gangion and put it into the cooler with the fish. It`s a heck of alot easier to deal with in the light of day and once the fish has cooled. If you are fishing multiple nights and want to be free of the responsibility during the day, you can very quickly and efficiently remove all the drops the last time you run the line and leave the mainline in place till tomorrow night. The mono drops allow as many as 100 drops to be worked from one bucket. The stiffer the drops the better they work without tanging. I use 125lb mono.

    I know another experienced member, whose opinion I generally respect, has posted his experience with clips as not being good. But he also posted that Seacatfish were no good to eat and we KNOW that is not the case. All I can do is offer my experience for your benefit.:wink::big_smile:
     
  9. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I first saw them used by a commercial fisherman, then tried them out for myself. I haven't trotlined in years, but I've got 5 new ones made up, ready to put into jumpboxes, just as soon as I get them made up.
    Jumpboxes are definitely easier to store if the sides are angled, but that also makes them much more difficult to build. I plan to make mine with sides straight up and down. I've seen 25-hook lines put out in less than 15 seconds, not counting the time it took to tie on the shore end, or the time it took to attach the weight at the other end. The main trick is to put the mainline into the box from the weight end, inserting the droppers into slots. When you get to the shore end of the line, jam it down into a slot to keep it from getting tangled. You always start putting the droppers into the end slot on one side, and proceed down that side, filling each slot in turn. After filling the last slot on a side, fill the slot nearest it next, and proceed down that side. Continue till all droppers have been put into slots. When putting out the line, there are a couple of critical points to remember. First, NEVER get any part of your body between where the hooks are coming off the box, and the water. Excellent way to get a bunch of hooks in you. Second, always keep the side of the box that the hooks are coming off of pointed toward the water. This means when all of the hooks have deployed from one side, you turn the box so the next side is pointing toward the water. If everything is kept neat, I know of only one thing that can almost always cause a problem. If your lines stay in the water long enough to become scummy, when that dries while the line is laying in the box, the line will be stuck together when it tries to pay out, and will probably drag the whole line and all the droppers out at once. Putting the line into the box and putting it back out before it dries out shouldn't cause a problem. The best thing is to clean such stuff off your line before you put it in the box; but if you don't, or can't, you'll have to take the line out of the box slow enough to pull the line apart as it pays out. Actually, the safest thing is to do this on shore. Yeah, that's a pain in the posterior; it's easier to run your line a second time and clean it off. After all, it's not something that's going to have to be done very often..just after you leave your lines in the water a long time.
    When you put the dropper lines into the slots, don't leave very much of the dropper sticking outside the box. You don't want the hook flailing around with enough slack to hang up on something.
    Bait your hooks while the line is still in the box. When you put out your line, you're putting it out ready to fish.
    If you're just after some fish for the freezer, an excellent method is to fish the riprap. Use a heavy cord or light rope to run from the edge of the water out 5'-15', depending on how deep you want to start fishing; then attach the shore end of the line to the rope. Deploy the trotline out toward the center. When you get to the end, attach a fairly heavy weight. I like to use something about 5#-10# or so, but that's strictly a personal preference. Use smaller hooks, suitable for eating size fish, and use small baits.
     
  10. catsmith1

    catsmith1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,073
    State:
    Haughton, Louisiana
    I would love to see some pics of a jump box and how the lines are stored.
     
  11. fugeman

    fugeman New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    ALABAMA
    Thanks jtrew. Maybe when you get one built you can take a pic of it for us. Would love to make a couple myself.:wink:
     
  12. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
  13. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Seems like there were some plans in the BOC library I used to make my jump boxes. Tried the box out by setting the line in the back yard, using the riding lawnmower. Yep, those things do jump out. LOL I discovered jugging about that time and just threw it in the shed. Rescued it to take a pic but the bottom has rotted out.... but you can see the sides and angles. It held 100 hooks.
     

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  14. fugeman

    fugeman New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    ALABAMA
    That looks just like the ones that I've seen. Are they hard to make?
     
  15. catsmith1

    catsmith1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,073
    State:
    Haughton, Louisiana
    thanks for the pics. how do you put the lines in it? trying to figure this all out. do they loop in a circle in the box or do the hooks go side by side? I would like to try this!
     
  16. ho_shi

    ho_shi New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Texas
    here is my "reel" trotline setup


    this holds about 200 ft of line and 50 hooks
     

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  17. ho_shi

    ho_shi New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Texas
    last pic

    and this works "reel" slick too!!
     

    Attached Files:

  18. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    My boxes were 10" wide at the top and 7" wide at the bottom.
    They were 30 inches long.
    I made them out of lathe and 1x4s only they were 3 inches high. I cut notches every 1 inch across the sides. IIRC i used a hacksaw to cut the notches which were really just 1/4 inch cuts just wide enough for the drops to rest in when baited.
    When traveling the hook rested in the cut.
    I started at shore and ran the boat upstream across the current. The elevated shelf I worked from kept everything up in the air and mostly out of trouble. I stood up and ran the boat at slightly more than idle speed and fed out the line. By the time I was out of hooks the line was taunt and the I just dropped the weight in the water.
    hope this helps
    just
     
  19. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Doesn't really make any difference but they are put in the box 1 hook at a time side by side starting with which ever end goes in the water last.
    It is important that they do not move around after they are put in the box.
    You have to remember that you have to bait them without disturbing the nest.
    You'll need your weight attached to the line before you start cause after you get started putting out line there ain't much time to do anything else.
    Best way to figure this all out is to make a box and try it out.
    It'll make a lot more sense after you do it a couple of times.

    In my post about how I make my boxes it should have read 1/4 inch deep cuts.

    best of luck
    just
     
  20. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    When putting the trotline into the jumpbox, put the first dropper into the last slot on one side; put the next dropper in the next slot on the same side. Continue down that side till you fill the last slot on that side; the next dropper goes into the closest slot on the next side. In other words, you start on one side and go right around the perimeter of the box.

    Attaching the weight ahead of time is certainly one way to deploy the trotline, but you can also put it on after you get the line out, but you do want a quick way to attach it, such as with a clip. It's important to have a good bit of excess mainline past the last hook, though, if you plan to attach the weight afterward, so you have time to grab the line AFTER the last hook has gone out.

    One method of preventing the bottom of the box from rotting out is to use screen wire for the bottom. This will also let the trotline dry out much faster.