Jugs

Discussion in 'LOCAL TEXAS TALK' started by Catfishingbuddy, Apr 13, 2008.

  1. Catfishingbuddy

    Catfishingbuddy New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    TX
    Anyone here can tell me or show pics of what they think is a good set up for a jug line, like one hook or two, like enough weight to set the jug up and just enough for it to lay on it's side. I seen some with a line for a weight and then a line off the side that had the hooks. I know they gotta be white and and your phone on them. Not sure if this was brought up but I'm gonna get me a few 2 liter coke bottles and use Krylon Fusion for plastic see how good it holds up. Might work on those noodles to. Thanks
     
  2. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I use 2-liter soda jugs with the jugline tied around the neck. I put about 3 ounces of small gravel, scrap pieces of lead, etc., inside each jug. Not only does that keep the jugs from being blown around so badly by the wind, but when a fish hits and tips up the jug, the weights slide down into the neck and keep the jug in the tipped, or 'flagged' position. I don't like to use sand because it always seems to get wet, and wet sand doesn't slide very well. I use a 16p or 20p nail for a weight; it's cheap, and doesn't hang up as often as a regular weight. For storage, wind the jugline around the neck and drop the nail inside the jug; when screwing on the cap, it will tighten the line; winding the jugline on counter-clockwise, the cap will cause the line to loosen when it's screwed on.
     

  3. fishrepair

    fishrepair New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    Kentucky
    I use a gallon milk jug. They make it easy to write your name and address with a permanent marker and if you get a 20 or 30 pound fish on the jug it wears out the fish twice as easy as a pop bottle.I also use a 4 ounce sinker so that the fish will hook itself pulling against the weight. I also use 1/0 circle hooks. Good luck, Ray
     
  4. kennylee

    kennylee New Member

    Messages:
    271
    State:
    Missouri -
    I use 1 liter soda bottles, I paint them flo-orange and wrap the bottom with reflector tape. The orange is to see them in day-light hours and the reflector for nights. I make the lines from 4 feet to 8 feet long, don't go to short or the jugs will get in shallow water (hard to retreive by boat). I use 2 to 3 oz. weights and 6/0 circle hook.
    I dont use flags or those types of strike indicator, because in the rivers I fish these don't work that well, giving false flags when hit by the wake of passing boats.
    I bait with fresh cut shad, place jugs in a staight line in the center of the river about 20 to 30 yards apart.
    good luck, kennylee
     
  5. Ulikedew

    Ulikedew New Member

    Messages:
    1,821
    State:
    Georgetown IN
    Well I thought I would check this thread out due to winning some jugs from Jugs by Bert . Never have tried jug fishing and I am looking forward to trying out. So if theres any advice for a newbie to this I am ready.



     
  6. Bigun

    Bigun New Member

    Messages:
    234
    State:
    Burnet, TX
    I started with 1/2 & 1 gal clorox jugs (they were free from a friend that uses it in a small water system) I tied the line to the handle and stored the rest in the bottle. This works ok but the jugs take up a lot of room. I used a mesh Duck decoy bag which will hold quite a few for handling and storage. I now use white noodles 2 1/2 to 3" diameter and from 12 to 18" long. I have had better luck free floating them with a single hook. A stainless #7 Eagle claw circle hook is about right where I fish. Bait preferences 1. Fresh cut shad. 2. fresh or frozen cut perch. 3. Fresh cut Black Saltie 4. Shrimp 5. Night crawlers. We usually tend our lines but leave them out over night sometimes.
    I have two friends who quite often catch their limit they usually put out 100 jugs. In my opinion this becomes more like work. I generally put out about thirty jugs and sit bach and have a coke and enjoy.
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Congratulations on winning the jugs, Brian! Bet you catch a lot of fish on them. One of the first things I would do is to put my jugs out on a lake or backwater, then back way off to see just how far away I could see them, both with and without binoculars. Remember that rough water can reduce their visibility, too. I've had fish carry mine out onto a large lake, where I had no idea where they were, and riding around looking for some jugs isn't my idea of fun. Mine will often get out of my immediate sight, but that's on a river where I can simply run upstream or downstream a little so that I can see them. Of course, when they get too strung out, it's time to pick up the stragglers and return them to the main pack. I like to try to cover as much of the water column as possible, having hooks from 3' below the surface down as close to the bottom as reasonably possible without hanging up too much.
     
  8. iviecatman

    iviecatman New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    texas
    If you look hard enough you can find some heavy plastic jugs at tractor dealers and some of the few remaining full service gas stations. They will last for years. Most of them will have oil in them but can be cleaned up. The best ones will have a lip at the top and bottom with keeps the line from falling off the jug. Some of the bleach jugs are made this way. I don't like bleach jugs or coke bottle because they are too thin and do not last very long. When you try to wind your line tightly on the jug it will colapse.
    I guess I'm old fashioned I like to find my own jugs and find my own rocks to tie and attatch to the bottom. I'm in the group that had rather find their Christmas tree instead of buying it. Would you not know it, my wife brought one in a box a couple of years ago.

    If you fish in a lake with lots of brush and trees as I do you need heavy main line, at least #72, #96 is better. When a fish wraps up around a tree you can cleat you line to your boat and then pull the line in different directions until you get the right angle to break the line below. A couple of years ago we pulle up a 20 ft long pecan tree limb that weighed nearly a hundred lbs. Wrapped around it was a line that contained a 54 and 46 lb bluecats. My friend and I managed to get both fish in the dip net and then pull everthing into the boat.

    I use #15 or #12 line for my rock staggings. Your rock is the most likely thing to get hung up and that size line will easily break. My favorite hook is an Eagle Claw 190 size 13/0 circle hook. That size hook will catch all sizes of fish and will also not tear out of a fished mouth so easily.

    Bait: I do most of my jugging in the summer months. If I am in a lake with lots of fish and you want the bigger fish you need a piece of big tough bait. I almost exclusively use the biggest bluegill that I can find and cut them into big pieces. The little fish cannot knock them off and generally not try to swallow the bait. When at a lake like Tawakoni or Choke this makes a huge difference.
     
  9. Catfishingbuddy

    Catfishingbuddy New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    TX
    I see there are a lot of ways of doing jug lines. You know I seen people use from nuts to sparkplugs for weights. I have always made my own weights from just making a hole in wood to useing copper end caps. With my jugs I am the same way. I will use a brick or just a 4 oz weight. Guess it depends on what the water is doing. What ever the water is doing I want my jugs to float as slowly as they can. Thats why I put a little water in my jugs. It depends to on how many hooks I have on a jug line where i'm at, nice lake two to three hooks, river (clean river) same two to three hooks, lot of tree and rocks one hook but more jugs. Bait use depends on what size cat I want, small bait for good eating fish and big baits for bigguns. I am getting some jugs up now (2 liter coke bottles) but these won't have water in them.

    Thank you everyone for all your post and how to of your own jugs. I think all are great ideas.
     
  10. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I have a test I use to see if a particular type of jug is sturdy enough to suit me. I put the cap on securely, lay it on the floor, stand on the jug, then bounce a little bit. If the jug doesn't collapse from that treatment, it won't collapse under fishing conditions. I've found that 2-liter jugs will stand up to that, but milk jugs won't; haven't tried laundry detergent jugs, but they look like they would hold up. I wind my line around the neck of the jug, and the ring around the lip and the shoulder of the jug keep the line in place just fine. I cut a 1" slice of swimming pool noodle and glue it around the cap so I have a place to stick my hooks for storage.
     
  11. Gentleben

    Gentleben New Member

    Messages:
    84
    State:
    Huffman, Texas
    well We use the fun noodles for our jugging adventures and somewhere on this board I have the detailed instructions on how to make them and by golly they do catch some fish!! You can get the fun noodles a twal mar tor the 99cents store very inexpensive t omake and teh do catc the mess of teh mctas b ygolly!!
    Check this link ou tfor thsoe instructions ..

    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=38746
     
  12. gottagetabigun

    gottagetabigun New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    OKLAHOMA
    i usually don't float mine. i like a jug with a neck on it to set my depth. on the multiple hooks be careful. i use only one, some use two. the more hooks you put on the more dangerous it is. tried five once. seems like the fish is almost always on the bottom hook and when you bring him up he is flopping around and you have four other hooks swinging around. imho
     
  13. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Randy, the trick when using a bunch of hooks on a single jugline is to put all the upper ones on detachable droppers with some type of trotline clip. Remove the hooks as you pull in the line. You want to always be able to hold the jugline above the uppermost permanently attached hook and still be able to net a fish on the bottom hook. I have my hooks 3' apart, which means I can hold the line above the 3rd hook from the bottom, hold it 6' above the water, and a fish on the bottom hook will be at the surface.
     
  14. aggiecat

    aggiecat New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    texas
    I have recently started using trotline clips on my jugs. I think it is much easier and safer as mentioned in the above post. For weight, decoy weights work great
     
  15. aggiecat

    aggiecat New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    texas
    I have recently started using trotline clips on my jugs. I think it is much easier and safer as mentioned in the above post. For weight, decoy weights work great for me
     
  16. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR