Jugging

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by UTVolGatorHater, Apr 20, 2006.

  1. UTVolGatorHater

    UTVolGatorHater New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    VA
    I have never Jugged for catfish before. What kind of jugs, line, hooks, bait should I use to get started? I will be jugging in a river in TN and I think it is 50 jugs per person. Thanks for any and all help.

    Derek
     
  2. rsimms

    rsimms New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Tennessee
    It speaks to you like a voice in the night.
    “Kersploosh.”
    Translated, that’s a catfish saying, “Catch me -- if you can.”
    The “kersploosh” sound is that of a 1-quart plastic oil jug being sucked beneath the surface. Remember the movie Jaws, when those big yellow barrels bob to the surface. They sit still for a little while, and then suddenly they wobble and bob, then streak across the water. It looks like magic, but you know, in the depths unseen, streaks a mass of primal muscle and sinew, hauling your jug on its journey.
    That’s what it’s like jug fishing for catfish. Hard-core juggers insist you’ve got to know “when and where to drop.” Especially if you want more catfish than your boat can carry. But the truth is, anybody can do it, anytime, and probably catch fish.
    Here’s the condensed lesson. Collect between 20 and 50 one-quart motor oil bottles. Tie a 4-to-6 foot length of heavy nylon line around the neck, where the lid screws on. Attach a hefty steel hook and a quarter-ounce sinker to each one. Stop by your neighborhood grocery and buy $3 worth of fresh chicken liver. You’re ready to fish.
    Go beneath a dam -- Watts Bar, Chickamauga, Nickajack, Ft. Loudon -- as long as it’s on the Tennessee River, you’re in the right place. Chances are you’ll do better if the generators have some water flowing. Attach a chunk of liver to each hook, set them out in the river, then sit back and listen for a “kersploosh.”
    I’m really not kidding about that. On a nice calm night, you can hear a jug wiggle in the water 50 yards away. When a big fish drags a jug all the way under, make that 100 yards.
    “I heard one wiggle,” I said to Charlie Duggan about 2 am Saturday. He laughed a little, but knew it was quite probable, and flipped on the Q-Beam.
    At first, the spear of light found nothing. But he panned to the left and the silver beam struck a jug dancing a jig. This fish wasn’t big enough to take the jug under. The trolling motor ran him down easily and we added another 2-pound blue cat to the livewell.
    A few minutes later, a more serious “kersploosh.” The spotlight illuminated a covey of 8 or 10 jugs about 50-feet away. At first glance, all was quiet. But 5 seconds later, a jug bobbed from beneath the surface -- just like those yellow barrels in Jaws.
    We were in for a race this time. A 10-pound catfish can make tracks when he wants. But finally Charlie laid hands on the jug in question. I slid the net beneath a fish big enough to feed my family two or three nights running.
    Most of the night I got to listen to Charlie moan about yellowtails. Those are threadfin shad, abundant below many area dams, and they make prime bait. When yellowtails are running, and the TVA turbines are churning just right against the wingwalls, you can use a wire dip net to scoop up all you want. Filet a yellowtail, a gizzard shad, or a river herring in one-inch squares, and no self-respecting catfish can stay away.
    Charlie and I both worked until after dark, so we were forced to settle for chicken livers. The action wasn’t fast and furious, but consistent. Charlie kept telling me about “the night we had two boats and both were chasing jugs all over the river, non-stop, all night. We had 299 pounds, to be exact.”
    Years ago, most jug fishermen were fans of one-gallon milk jugs. You don’t need them. The one-quart jugs are a lot easier to handle and store -- and plenty big enough to wear down even those 20 and 25 pound catfish.
    You’re allowed up to 50 jugs on a single sportfishing license. The law says each one must be tagged or marked with the owners name and address. I’ve never heard of anyone getting a ticket for not doing that -- but it’ll sure make me mad if you don’t keep count, and pick up all your jugs when you’re done.
    It’s meat fishing. Not a lot of sport, just a whole lot of fun. Chunk out the jugs, lay back in the boat with your favorite ice cold beverage. Watch the moon rise at midnight, the sun rise in the morning, and count how many times you hear something go “kersploosh,” in between.
     

  3. UTVolGatorHater

    UTVolGatorHater New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    VA
    I think I am going to try to get started near John Seivor dam on Cherokee Lake acutally the holston river part. So it sound pretty simple. Usually the times I have been there the water isn't too deep maybe 5-6 feet near the dam but me and my grandfather caught some 18-25 pounders on reels about 5-6 years ago. So I know they are in there. Thanks again for your help.

    Derek
     
  4. T-Bone

    T-Bone New Member

    Messages:
    1,125
    State:
    South of Dallas
    Question for you juggers out there : While jug fishin' on a big lake, would I be better off finding a cove to jug in ? Out on the main lake, how do ya prevent the jugs from just blowing all over the lake ? I'd like to try it sometime, just not sure how to keep the jugs from getting away from me.
     
  5. caatstalker

    caatstalker New Member

    Messages:
    265
    State:
    oklahoma
    i used to jug a lot . now i use them mostly to find places i will r/r fish it cuts down on a lot of set time when i am in new water ,i will ease along pick out a spot that looks good ,graph it put about 3 jugs on it . on thease i use a concreat little 3 lb wt. ( fill a drink cup) with mix presto put 3 drops on lt at different depths. on to a new spot. give em about 6 hrs go have a see . no fish move em , fish mark spot on gps or map. build a good list of honey holes this way. works for me any ways. sometimes i even cactha kitty.
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    For me, 2 liter soda jugs provide the best compromise between bulkiness and visibility. Some parts of the Tennessee (and Arkansas, where I am) are well over half a mile wide. A 2 liter soda jug painted yellow is just easier to see than a smaller oil jug or foam noodle. Now if you're on smaller waters, a cove, oxbow, or some place like that, smaller jugs may work just fine. I like to use the quart size when jugging for crappie.
    But, larger jugs tend to be blown around worse by the wind. When I was figuring out how to make my jugs self flagging, I discovered that I was also making them somewhat 'blow-proof'. Inside each of my soda jugs, I put about 3 ounces of clean gravel, small wheel weights, or the like. I don't use sand because wet sand doesn't slide well. Water, marbles, or ball bearings don't work well for me because they move back and forth so easily that wave action often causes the jug to 'flag'. This self flagging system works very well for me, but I also found that the little bit of extra weight kind of 'anchors' the jug, keeping the wind from blowing it around too fast.
     
  7. TNcat

    TNcat New Member

    Messages:
    150
    State:
    TN
    Dereck first of all welcome to the BOC, there are so much info in here about any kind of catfishing there is, that it is just mind boggling. Just look around and ask questions, there are alot of people in TN that jug.Ohhh and by the way I love that user name 'UTVOLGatorhater", I just love that!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:)
     
  8. TNcat

    TNcat New Member

    Messages:
    150
    State:
    TN
    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH. Arlington I thought we were Bud's!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOL
     
  9. YeeHaw

    YeeHaw New Member

    Messages:
    446
    State:
    Quincy Illinois
    I just use milk jugs. I spray paint them my own color, so everybody knows that they are mine, and i but 40Lb test line on a circle hook and bait, and throw it out and wait for it to start dancing, then take to boat and get it.
     
  10. UTVolGatorHater

    UTVolGatorHater New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    VA
    Thanks for all the info.