Jugging for crappie?

Discussion in 'Crappie Fishing' started by bud_rabon, May 23, 2006.

  1. bud_rabon

    bud_rabon New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Alabama
    Has anyone ever heard of jugging for crappie? If so how bout some info. might want to give her a shot.
     
  2. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Yup. My method is to determine how deep I want to fish, tie on that much 10# mono, attach an ordinary gold wire crappie hook and a split shot a few inches above it, and bait with a minnow. I've used quart Pennzoil jugs, and also 2-liter soda jugs. When freefloating jugs for catfish, my jugs get very scattered, and I want larger jugs so I can see them better, but when jugging for crappie, they don't get scattered very much at all, so soze doesn't matter. IMO, you could even use 16 ounce soda jugs if you wanted. Don't forget to check the regs about jugging in your state, and any 'special waters' regs that might apply.
     

  3. davesoutfishing

    davesoutfishing New Member

    Messages:
    479
    State:
    Menominee Michigan
    Here's a look at some other offbeat ways to catch crappie.


    JUGGING GOLDFISH
    When we think about goldfish, there comes immediately to mind the image of children amused by watching the shiny orange creatures swim round and round in a fishbowl like one in Dr. Seuss. But some anglers buy these staples of the home aquarium to fish for crappie, believing that using goldfish instead of minnows catches them bigger slabs. And crappie will indeed bite goldfish more readily than they do some other baits, perhaps because of the bait's high visibility, especially in stained water. Further, goldfish do seem to live longer than minnows do.

    Today, some crappie fishermen use quart bleach bottles to catch crappie, just as other anglers jug for catfish. Tying monofilament on the necks of the jugs, they suspend either goldfish or live minnows on hooks or 1/24- or 1/32-ounce crappie jigs on the lines; then they allow the jugs to blow across the mouths of creeks, river ledges and shallow-water coves where the crappie may spawn during the spring. When the crappie take the jigs, they tip up the jugs, and the angler brings in the crappie.

    Be sure to check the regulations where you plan to fish before using this method.


    CHUMMING
    Try chumming, a technique usually associated with saltwater angling, to improve your crappie fishing. Anchor over a likely-looking spot and sprinkle cornmeal around the boat every few minutes; soon, minnows will begin to gather to feed on the chum, and the minnows will attract the crappie.

    This technique works even better if you can start the chumming a day or two before you start fishing. The crappie will be lined up for you then.


    EGGING
    To attract minnows and, thus, crappie to your fishing area, crush your breakfast eggshells, take them to the lake, and sprinkle the shell pieces overboard in a circle around the boat. The pieces will flutter seductively down through the water and draw in first minnows and then crappie.

    Whether the pieces of shell look like the scales of just-eaten baitfish or the crappie just like the fluttering motion is of no real consequence. Whatever the reason, it'll help you catch more slabs.


    FLY-FISHING FOR CRAPPIE
    Few people fly-fish for crappie, so some may find this an unusual approach to catching crappie. But you can have great fun taking crappie on your fly rod. Use a 4- to 6- weight outfit and weight-forward floating or fast-sink tip line and attach a 4- to 6-foot leader tapering down to a 6- to 8-pound tippet; fish with a small streamer fly in sizes 2 to 6. You may have to crimp a small split shot on the leader a foot in front of the fly for extra weight.

    Cast the fly near deep points, bridge pilings and flooded timber, along dropoffs and to the edges of weedbeds. Then retrieve with short, sharp strips to work the fly at 4- to 12-foot depths.
     
  4. Ace

    Ace New Member

    Messages:
    881
    State:
    Gastonia N
    I do not know what the law is in other states but in North Carolina it is illegal to use live bait on jug or trot line but their is no limit to the number of jugs.If the law is still the same in South Carolina you can not have a fishing rod in your boat while jug fishing.And you can only have two reels when you are bank fishing but you can have all you want in a boat.Also you have to have your ID atached to the jugs.And there is a limit to the number of jugs you can fish.

    :doubt:


    :cat:
     
  5. Aftercats

    Aftercats New Member

    Messages:
    236
    State:
    Tennesse
    sound like the carolina's are out for me!!!!!!:confused2:
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Reading the above posts reminded me of an old trick for crappie fishing. If you're catching fish and they turn off, scale a couple of your caught fish while holding them over the side. The scales fluttering down will often turn the crappie back on.
     
  7. bud_rabon

    bud_rabon New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Alabama
    Thanks, For the info going camping on the river this weekend and weather permitting I'm going to try it out. I'll let yall know how it goes.