Juggin

Discussion in 'Channel Catfish' started by bud_rabon, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. bud_rabon

    bud_rabon New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Alabama
    Is there any old timers or new timers that can give me some good tips on jugging in the river
     
  2. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    What river? If it's the Tennessee, I've fished it like I do the Arkansas...put my jugs out in the current, do my best to keep them from spreading out for much more than half a mile, and pull in the fish. One thing I found that the section of the Tennessee I jugged was much deeper than the section of the Arkansas I usually jug, and I had to put on an extra 40'-50' of line on each jug. My personal preference is to have the jugline as close to the bottom as possible without hanging up too often; but if I don't hang up occasionally, I'm not fishing deep enough. And I like to have hooks covering the entire water column. Sometimes I catch them near the top, and sometimes near the bottoml.
     

  3. bud_rabon

    bud_rabon New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Alabama
    Thanks for the info. Got any on running fish baskets?
     
  4. rsimms

    rsimms New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Tennessee
    Unlike Jerry, I fish shallow when jugging. But I always go at night. Drifting jugs in TN River... typically river channel is 20 ft. deep. I'll set jug lines at 6 to 8 feet deep. And we catch plenty... sometimes more than plenty!
     

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  5. confederate

    confederate New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    Tennessee
    I agree with Richard I usually go no deeper than 6 to 8 ft.
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Nice looking fish, Richard! We have a lot of fun catching those kitties over 10#, but I try to just keep the ones between 1 1/2# - 10#. Smaller than that, and they need to be cooked whole--and I'm the only one in my family that will eat fish cooked that way. Several reasons for turning the larger ones back, such as: harder to clean; more buildup of toxins; good for the gene pool. Usually, the ones over 5# or 6# yield fillets that are just right for broiling, so I like them for that; the others give just the size fillet I like for deep frying. About a third to half the fish we eat are broiled.
     
  7. bud_rabon

    bud_rabon New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Alabama
    IN water 12 to 18 feet. Would you still stay 6 to 8ft or would you go shallowe
     
  8. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I believe I would put out sufficient hooks to cover the water column. If they are suspended, you'll find the depth and can adjust your hooks accordingly. One thing about them, they'll not do what you think any self respecting catfish would do. Cover the bases.
     
  9. rsimms

    rsimms New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Tennessee
    I agree completely... fact is I rarely keep any, Just the occasional mess of 2-5 lber's.for the table
     
  10. loki1982

    loki1982 New Member

    Messages:
    420
    State:
    Texas
    My input may not be the best as ive never jugged in a river only in lakes. And we use weighted jugs where as it seems alot of people use free floating.

    We use a 2liter soda bottle, applejuice bottle, orange juice bottle or whatever we have avialable. Have around 30 foot of trotline type string with 5 barrel swivels on it around 5 foot between each swivel. We put a small cinderblock at the bottom. Run a 2 foot line from each swivel with your hooks on the end. Bait up and find water you want to fish in. We usually pick 20-28 foot of water, but latley have been doing as low as 8 foot. Basically what youve made is a trotline that is vertical.

    80% of our big fish are caught in 20-28 foot of water on the fiorst hook which is 5 foot under the surface. The good thing about this jug setup is that you have bait at 5 different levels so wherever the fish are swimming, theyll find your bait.

    Now this may not work the same in a river so adjust it for your needs.
     
  11. dickieboy

    dickieboy New Member

    Messages:
    17
    State:
    Cedar Grove, TN
    You missed one point Jerry. Big fish lay a bunch more eggs increasing the odds on survival.