Jug Fishing

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by Gaspagoo, Aug 2, 2008.

  1. Gaspagoo

    Gaspagoo New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    Alabama
    I want to jug fish for the first time,and i wanted to know what is the best set up for jug fishing and what do i need to do it?
     
  2. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Welcome to the BOC, Ben! Let's see, assuming that there are 10,000 juggers in the country, you'll probably get 11,000 opinions on what is the best way. You're going to have to look at all the different ideas you get here and decide what seems best for you. Give it a try, then adjust or modify your techniques till you find what works best for you.
    Anchored jugs generally stay where you put them, and can be very good for fishing a very specific spot or area. Freefloating jugs may stay where you put them if they're in a sheltered cove or backwater, but if they're where the wind can hit them, or if you're jugging where there's a current, they're going to get scattered; harder to keep up with, but covering much more water, and possibly more likely to encounter fish.
    As for baits, that will depend mainly on what species you're fishing for, and what works in your area. For instance, most people feel that live baitfish work best for flatheads; but some do very well on cut bait.
    The type of jug you use should depend on a number of things, such as: expense...what you can, or are willing, to spend for each jug; visibility...anchored jugs are generally easy to find unless a big fish has dragged one out into the main part of the lake...you may need to be able to spot freefloating jugs from half a mile or more away. This could mean that you need to use a very large diameter noodle, or go to using a soda jug (my preference).
    If you're going to be jugging at night, you need to have something to help you see the jugs in the dark, or in a spotlight. Some like to use reflective tape on the outside of the jugs; some like to use chemlights, either inside a clear jug, or outside if it's painted. You can use a big rubber band to hold the chemlight, or glue a connector to each jug, then just stick the chemlight into the connnector. Chemlights are available from one of our sponsors, Wildwolf Products at a very reasonable price, and each tube of 100 chemlights also contains 100 connectors. Here's a link:
    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=9251

    There are tons of stuff on the board about jugging. There are even several threads on it currently active. Try doing a search on 'jugging', and see what you come up with. If you have a problem with the search, give a holler.
     

  3. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    Welcome Ben and Jtrew said about all that can be said. It's alot of fun. Follow the law and only keep what ya need. Have fun and enjoy the BOC.
     
  4. tiny b

    tiny b Active Member

    Messages:
    847
    State:
    TX
    I love to jug fish and in my case it has been an ongoing learning experience. I'm on my fourth design change of my jugs. All of them have caught fish but I keep thinking about improvements. Start simple and it won't take long before you will start making changes. Check out the library, lots of good tips .
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Never be totally content with your jug design. I've been jugging for 25 years, and I made a fairly major change last summer; still in the process of implementing it on all my jugs (mine, daughters, grandkids, guests, etc.). I make my jugs out of 2-liter soda bottles, and one thing I've envied about the foam noodles is the ability to stick the hooks into the foam for better storage. So, I cut a noodle into 1" thick disks, enlarged the center hole so that a jug cap fits snugly into it, then glued the foam disk onto the cap. Now I have a place to stick my hooks when I store my jugs. For storage, I like big plastic bags when I'm on the boat, because when empty, they don't take up any space, but when storing them at home, I like to use the plastic jugholders/racks that the soda-filled jugs are shipped in. But they hold 8 jugs each, and Arkansas allows us to have 20 jugs each. Who wants to have to mess with a rack half full? So, I cut 1/4 of the rack off each end of several racks and attached them to a regular, uncut rack; now I have racks that hold 10 jugs each. Two racks hold a spread for one person. Much easier to keep track of during storage. Another advantage of using the rack for storage is that you can attach, inspect, sharpen, or change the hooks on the jugs without having to remove the jugs from the rack. I can use 10-jug racks to store the jugs that I have painted, but haven't yet put on a name and address as required by state law. Then, if I'm going to be taking along a guest, I can simply grab a couple of those racks, have the guest print name & address on the jug, and go jugging. After the trip, I can simply hit the jug with a little spray paint to cover the name & address and put the jugs back in storage till I need them again.
     
  6. slimer1

    slimer1 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    Missouri
    jtrew, We use mesh laundry bags which are 36"h x 24" wide and have a draw string in them,and can fit 25 of our noodle jugs in each one. We use the larger noodles at 12" to 15" long. They also fold up into a small area.
     
  7. ole whiskers

    ole whiskers Guest

    I use a 2ft swim noodle with pvc pipe through it. Drill a hole in one end of pipe to tie your line too. When the fish takes the bait the noodle will stand straight up. Easy to see at night.
     
  8. Sunday Money

    Sunday Money New Member

    Messages:
    81
    State:
    north carolina

    Slimer sounds like you stole the words outta my mouth. Thats a very good set up. I use a duck decoy bag that is made of mesh, so when you put up a stringer of slimey, stinky, and wet jugs they can dry out pretty quickly and it helps alot with clutter in the boat. We use jugs about 14 inches long and punch a hole in the noodle make our knots around the jug then run the line down the inside of the noodle to one side. This way when a fish takes the hook, the jug will stand up and aware you which jugs have fish. Also helps when the wind blows theyll turn head on into the wind and not blow too fast from where you drop them in the water. Hard to explain thoroughly on here, hopefully you can understand, if not ask more detailed questions, ill be happy to answer the best i can. Definitely check your state laws, here in north carolina we're limited to 70 jugs, one hook per jug, no live bait, and name and address must be labeled on their.
     
  9. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Slimer, what's the diameter of your jugs? The only objection I have to the regular sized foam noodles is that I can't see them from any great distance. I made up a batch of jugs using square pieces of packing foam, and I started having trouble seeing them at less than 100 yards; they just didn't stick high enough above the water for my purposes. I mostly jug the Arkansas River, and having to be able to see jugs 1/2 mile away is not at all unusual. I've heard of some guys using foam noodles that were as big a diameter as my 2-liter jugs, and that would certainly solve the visibility problem, but the ones like that I've seen around here (seldom), were $5-$6 per noodle. That's about what I have in a set of 20 of my jugs. Of course, the cost of line & hooks have to be added to that figure. But that can vary, depending on the type & length of line, and size and type of hooks. Cost of jugs concerns me for several reasons. Despite my best efforts, I do occasionally lose a jug; and when I have a bunch of jugs out in the channel and a barge comes by, I can't always get them all picked up. In that instance, it's not unusual to see the barge plowing along with several jugs caught on the front of the barge; also, I'll find several jugs that have been ruined by the props, and several more that have the juglines so tangled by the prop wash that I have to put on new lines. That's just part of the cost of jugfishing the Arkansas. And I have lots of jugs. A set of 20 for me; a set for my oldest daughter, Gardenhawk; a set for her boyfriend; 2 sets for my grandsons; a set or two for guests; plus spare replacement jugs.
     
  10. tiny b

    tiny b Active Member

    Messages:
    847
    State:
    TX
    Jerry, it's a good thing you don't use whiskey jugs or you would need a liver transplant. We don't fish a river as big as the Arkansas but it sure sounds like you have it going for you. I only fish about 20 to25 jugs .
     
  11. jlingle

    jlingle New Member

    Messages:
    1,036
    State:
    Altus, Okl
    Jtrew, when we have guests come along on our jugfishing trips, we use jugs with duct tape on them. We just put a new piece of duct tape on the jug, where we can put their name & address on it. Next time we go with a different person, they get a new piece of tape. Easier than repainting.
     
  12. kevinmays

    kevinmays New Member

    Messages:
    45
    State:
    tn
    i have fished with just about any jug you can imagine. by far the best results i have had are from these. these are made from the xtra lrg noodles cut in 10inch sections. makes 6 per noodle. pvc is 1 inch dia cut in 20inch sections. also makes 6 per 10 ft piece. no waste at all. if $$$ was no object i still wouldnt make any changes to these.

    i store them in a lrg plast crate from walmart and it holds 50 perfectly

    i have caught fish from 1 lb to 82 lbs. never lost a jug and the 50-80lbers keep it down 20 seconds max. there is a 3/4 dia 5inch steel rod in the middle to tip and flag. perfect deep hook sets on most every fish.

    http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k310/kevinmays/noodle.jpg

    http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k310/kevinmays/noodle2.jpg
     
  13. slimer1

    slimer1 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    Missouri
    jtrew, We don't use the great big noodles ours are about 5" across. We mainly fish on lakes which makes it easier to stay in a good distance to be able to see them. I can see where river jugging is a lot more difficult, to see and stay with them. Also the different colors work in different light conditions. I know some states require the use of white jugs only, and I think that would be tough to see. In my opinion the green, pink and orange ones are the best to use, but also have blue ones as well. Up here the ones we use cost around $3.98. A little tip on names and tags, We cut a piece of inner tube into rubber band pieces and put on the opposite end of the string, this serves 3 purposes, 1 it shows direction of travel when the wind is blowing, 2 we write our names on pieces of plastic and stick them under it, 3 when you wind up your string you can slide your hook under it also and it doesn't tear your noodle up like when you stick your hook in it. Jeff
     
  14. Cdbush28

    Cdbush28 New Member

    Messages:
    58
    State:
    Washington
    The river i fish in southern indiana is very curvy and has lots of log jams. Not Sure if you guys jug rivers like these. I have never tried it but have always wanted to. I just figured i would be fighting my jugs in brush piles all night.
     
  15. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Sounds like a good idea, Jerrod, but I'd be afraid that the tape would come off.

    CB, if the current flows through the log jams, then they'll probably give you fits; otherwise, they may cause an occasional problem, but that's par for the course. I'm always having to get a jug loose from a rock dike, shallow spot, trotline, or retrieve it from a slack water area it's drifted into.