Jug Fishing

Discussion in 'LOCAL TENNESSEE TALK' started by EarlyBird, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. EarlyBird

    EarlyBird New Member

    Messages:
    16
    State:
    East TN
    I have always used rod and reel to catch cats, but I have been reading about jug fishing. Im having a hard time understanding this method. How do you keep the cats from swimming off with the jug, and wouldn't it be tought to pull a 30+ lb cat up on fishing line. Any in put on tips or ticks, and even the best way to use jugs would be appreciated.
     
  2. rwilley3

    rwilley3 New Member

    Messages:
    1,389
    State:
    Brighton, Tenne
    I used to jug with my dad and I don't care much for it anymore since I pole fish. When we did we had two oil cans(yes that dates me I mean oil came in steel cans) soldered together. Later we went to those baby formula cans since you could get your hand around them. They had a loop one one end and we always used trotline line. We fished here on the MS River and fished lines about 6-10 feet long and floated over the top of sandbars. We usually fished about 30 jugs and they get scattered pretty quick. We always floated along with them and after they were seperated too far or kicking out in the channel or getting in front of barges or whatever we picked them up and did it again. I don't know anything about jugging in lakes. Hope that helps.
     

  3. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    You bet they swim off with the jugs, and they don't have to be a big fish either. But, hunting all your jugs is interesting and exciting also. You can anchor or free float your jugs, or something in between. If you know the wind/current will not move a two pound anchor, you can set the jugs out where ever you want them. The problem is a 2 lb. anchor may not hold for a big cat and he'll take the rig into deep water. You may never see the jug again, especially if two pounds is enough to hold the jug underwater. If you do get a big un, you can try to coax him up from the deep. If he takes off, let him go. He will pull the jug around for a while, then stop to get its breath, more or less. Then you pick the jug up and try to coax him up again. Keep doing this until you can net him. You let him pull the jug for a while and he will calm down. LOL. But I tell you what, if you saw the movie "JAWS" where the stuck him with three barrels and he took off and had water flying over the top of the barrels, wait till you get a feisty catfish on a jug. LOL
     
  4. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Personally, I use 100# twisted nylon cord for my juglines, which is much less likely to cut me than small diameter superbraid. And I have a couple of rules I use when jugfishing: Rule #1 comes from my saltwater fishing days--never wrap your line around anything you really want to keep; rule #2 is that when a fish makes a sudden run, don't try to hold onto the jug or line--let the fish make its run, then chase down the jug again. I've seen the time when we'd have to let the jug go 8 or 10 times before we got the fish to the net. (Cats caught on a jug are often hooked very lightly, and if you pull very hard on the line, you're likely to end up with an empty hook.)
     
  5. EarlyBird

    EarlyBird New Member

    Messages:
    16
    State:
    East TN
    Thanks for the info!! Im going to give it a try, and see what happens.
     
  6. tntitans21399

    tntitans21399 New Member

    Messages:
    82
    State:
    Tennessee
    I've also never jug fished but was curios about it. What did you use for bait and did you use a normal hook or a treble hook?
     
  7. TN-CATFISHER

    TN-CATFISHER New Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Cannon County, Middle TN
    I've only jug fished one local lake that has primarily channel cats. My experience is that channels tend to sit and analyze your bait, peck at it, and make a nice leisurely dinner out of it. If I'm not there to set the hook, I'll usually miss them. When jug fishing there is nothing to set the hook other then the jug itself and the fish must dive down with the bait in order to hook itself, which channels don't tend to do. The result for me is a lot of empty jug line hooks or fish that come off when I start pulling them in.

    If this lake had mainly blue cats or flatheads I think this would be a different story. Those fish grab your bait and run. I imagine the hook up ratio would be nearly 100% with those fish assuming you've got nice sharp hooks.

    This has just been my personal experience. I don't know, maybe I'm doing something wrong, but if it was me, I'd probably take a different approach if I was mainly after channels. There's also trot lines and yo yo's as an option. Yo yo's have a method of setting the hook from what I understand, but I've never tried them. My 2 cents.
     
  8. bwhupp

    bwhupp New Member

    Messages:
    1,680
    State:
    Belleville
    I jug fish frequently and have not had much problems bringing in 10# channels and such. I jug lakes and that usually is not an issue of having monster fish, so those are all new problems fo rme to deal with if I ever choose to go that route.

    I use circle hooks... anywhere from 3/0 to 8/0. I often will put those full baby/small shad on a 3/0 circle and cut off it's tail and cut a hole to its gut pocket. I have had great success with this method at securing channels and taking home a dozen eaters in no time for dinner.
     
  9. TN-CATFISHER

    TN-CATFISHER New Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Cannon County, Middle TN
    Oh yeah, to you Tennessee folks I just thoguht I'd mention that Percy Priest has some fantastic jug from what I've heard. Large flatheads and blues are routinely caught on jugs out of that lake. It's slightly out of my driving radius so I haven't tried it myself yet. Good luck.
     
  10. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I use Big Eye trotline hooks (J-type) because they have a big eye that makes changing out damaged hooks much easier, and because they hold up better than the kahle hooks I tried one season. The kahle hooks worked great, but rusted out after only one season.
    My favorite bait is skipjack, followed by fresh cut shad. I don't like to use the little shad because they rot so quickly, requiring that you change your bait very frequently. I drop my jugs and don't pick them up till I'm ready to go home, unless they flag, or they get hung up on something, requiring me to get them unhung and re-drop them with the main bunch. When I couldn't get skipjack or shad, I've used cured chicken livers, chitlings with added scent, bacon, salt pork, cut bream, etc. Incidentally, when I used the cut bream, I only caught channel cats, even though I normally catch more blues than channels in that location.
     
  11. dickieboy

    dickieboy New Member

    Messages:
    17
    State:
    Cedar Grove, TN
    I use a swim noodle for the float. Put a 1/2" pvc pipe thru noodle so line doesn't cut noodle. main line is #80 dacron. I use a 1/8oz egg above a swivel then a 8-20" 20# leader and a 5/0 circle hook. I have a 2.5" sleeve to post my name/address and to wrap with reflector tape when used at night. They look like this:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. leupy

    leupy New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    Ohio
    I have jug lined and usually use cut bait what ever the cas net brings in, most often I fish rod and reel in the Ohio River.
     
  13. craddock1

    craddock1 Active Member

    Messages:
    962
    State:
    TENNESSEE
    Depends on what i am fishing for. For big cats i use 30" noodles with pvc through it. 600 pound test parachute cord with 12/0 trotline hooks 10 -12 foot main line with 2 oz weight and an 18" drop on a trotline clip. I set the hooks 1 per line from 2 feet to 8 feet. Usually catch more at 2 feet. I use the biggest bream I can catch or fist size or bigger cut skipjack. For 20 pound or smaller i use the same main line with 180 pound nylon drop with 8/0 trotline hooks. Use smaller bait for these baby's. anything 5 pounds or smaller stays on for bait. some of my biggest cats were caught on cats. I fish watts bar mostly where you have deep channels surrounded by flats where the fish feed.
     
  14. EarlyBird

    EarlyBird New Member

    Messages:
    16
    State:
    East TN
    I thank all of you for sharing and giving me some good pointer and some direction on where I need to start. Thanks!!!!
     
  15. catfishbills

    catfishbills New Member

    Messages:
    630
    State:
    Tennessee
    I have seen folks use 2-litre coke bottles for jugs (painted black) and place some reflector tape on them. Tie your line onto the small end of the bottle and when a fish hits it, the bottle stands up (flags a strike). I would use circle hooks for sure on these and set my depths at different levels untill I found the fish. :wink:
     
  16. Coach Currier

    Coach Currier New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    TN
    I have jugged often, I use medium sized treble hooks and as far as bait goes you can use just about anything!!!!!! I get my best results on chicken liver if I am jugging fast water I use either pork or beef liver it is just as bloody but alot tougher... I guess the strangest bait I have used with great success is Ivory soap, LOL I dont know what it is about the soap but I have a real good % of quality fish on it... No real big fish but quality eating size.. When I bait up I use several different baits that way you can see what is thier flavor of the day... When that is found out you can have a real interesting nite!!! Anything from shad to hotdogs, one nite I used raw oyesters they loved it.. Shrimp work well also... I have caught them as large as 40 lbs on jugs.. And have caught as many as 32 in one 24 hour period
     
  17. gottagetabigun

    gottagetabigun New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    OKLAHOMA
    we use wesson oil jugs. i like a jug with a neck on them so you can put a half hitch in it. this sets your depth. we use a 14 oz. sinker (homeade) we set ours on bottom as opposed to floating them. i find we catch bigger fish this way. we use a 7/0 kahle hook and as big a bait,live, bluegill,crappie as we can find. we don't catch as many fish but the ones we do are usually 8-10+. i really don't like using cut bait because you are constantly rebaiting. but we are fishing for bigger fish. mainly flatheads. the earlier poster was right about kahle hooks rusting/dulling. we usually change hooks every year. a lot of folks put up to 5 hooks on a jug. we use one, i would suggest no more than two. when you have 5 hooks on(the fish is almost always on the bottom hook) and you get a fish you pull him up there will be 4 hooks above him swinging around. this can be very dangerous. tried this once and decided the less hooks the better. right or wrong this is the way we do it. we also stay with our jugs. in an hour you would be suprised how far a fish can take a jug. hope this helps.
     
  18. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Good point about the hooks. You really want to be able to hold the jugline above the top hook while someone nets the fish, even if it's on the bottom hook. OR, you can attach your upper hooks in such a way that you can quickly and easily remove them as you pull in your jugline. One of our sponsors makes the EZ trotline clip that will work great for this. I've got my anchored jugs rigged with 75' of line with places to attach droppers every 3'; even if I only have 15'-20' of line out, trying to handle it with droppers permanently attached would be a nightmare, and dangerous to boot.
     
  19. craddock1

    craddock1 Active Member

    Messages:
    962
    State:
    TENNESSEE
    I would stay away from the two liter pop bottles. they are thinner than ever. A big cat can take it deep enoug to burst it. I love the feeling of watching a 30 inch noodle go down out of sight but i know if it is not hung up it will be back up. You an see an orange noodle pretty deep.