Jug fishing on lake Dardanelle

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by rushryder, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. rushryder

    rushryder New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    Arkansas
    I'm new to this group. I have 3 boys and I'm sorry to say they are not interested in fishing yet. I was thinking they might enjoy jugging only I don't know any good spots on lake dardanelle. We live in Russellville Arkansas. If anyone knows any good spots and don't mind telling me I could sure use some advise. Some good tips on jugging would be awesome too. Thanks
     
  2. Big Sam

    Big Sam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,344
    State:
    Booneville AR
    Name:
    Sam
    :) Welcome to the brotherhood! I jug fish in the spring above the dam toward 22 highway that goes to paris...go under the bridge and set em' back in that cove...caught a lot of nice one's there. Setting my jugs from 3 to 12 ft deep..I see what level there at then set them all where there hitting. Another good spot below the dam at dardnelle is to the right when you launch about 2 miles down on the right is the pipe that dicharges waste water man you can tear them up there..you can see the pipe it's up on the bank above the water line...When ya can't get shad anywhere try there...also nice little pearch hang out there.....Good luck! :D
     

  3. TOPS

    TOPS New Member

    Messages:
    4,099
    State:
    Cabot,Arkansas
    Welcome to the Brotherhood! Glad to see another member join that is close to me I live in London,Arkansas about 2 miles from the hot water out let ramp at the nuclear plant. The hot water outlet is a good place to jug. Our fellow brother Jtrew from Little Rock caught 18 pound blue there last winter. :D
     
  4. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Welcome to the BOC, RR! The trick to getting your boys interested in jugfishing is to let them pull in and net the fish. Just be sure to remind them that you don't want to try to 'horse' the fish in on a jug, because it's often hooked poorly, and a hard pull will pull the hook out. If the cat wants to make a run, let it go and chase the jug down again.
    Back in the 1980s, we lived in Atkins, and I jugged and trotlined the river from Dardanelle to Morrilton a lot during the summer; spring and fall I jugged and trotlined the nuclear plant outlet. Here's the way I rigged my juglines for those spots. Tie a 16p or 20p nail on the end of 100# test nylon line. I use twisted, but some people prefer braided; either will work. 12" above the nail, make a 4" dropper in the line, using a double overhand (surgeons') knot; if you tied this knot correctly, it will form a figure 8 as you slowly tighten it. Make another loop 36" above that loop, then make a third knot 36" above the second knot. Cut the line 6' above the top loop. I said 'cut' the line, but when using twisted line, I use a butane lighter and actually burn the line in two to prevent unraveling. While many people like using sections of foam noodles designed as swimming pool toys, I find them too hard to see on the river, where my jugs get spread out considerably; that problem wouldn't exist if you limit your jugging to coves and backwaters where the jugs stay within a limited area. Two-liter soda jugs seem to be the best compromise for me; anything smaller is too hard to see at a distance, and anything larger is just too bulky. I use a $.97 can of yellow spray paint to paint the outside of the jugs after I remove the plastic wrapper. If I'm careful, I can paint 20 jugs with one can of this paint. After trying several other colors, I settled on yellow as being the most visible and identifiable; black can be seen a long way, but you can't tell it from a stump from 1/2 mile away; white gets lost in the glare; international orange doesn't show up as well in low light. Put 2-3 ounces of small gravel, sinkers, spark plugs, tire weights, or whatever inside the jug. Don't use sand; wet sand doesn't slide well. The purpose of these weights is to keep the jug in a 'flagged' position when you get a bite. The bite causes the jug to tip on its end, the weights slide down into the neck, and the jug stays tipped, letting you know you need to check that jug. Tie the end of the jugline around the neck of the jug and wrap the line around the neck, leaving the loops hanging free; be sure to wrap the line clockwise as you look down on the top of the jug. When you get to the end of the line, remove the cap, drop the nail inside, and put the cap back on. Because the cap tightens by turning it clockwise, it will tighten the line rather than loosening it. I prefer using 5/0 trotline hooks, but 4/0 will work. The big eye lets you put the end of the loop through the eye then bring the hook through the loop to attach the hook without using a knot; the hook can be removed just as easily. Removing the hooks between trips keeps them from tangling and from rusting due to dampness. You can start putting in your jugs below the hwy 7 bridge, but you want to get them in by the first big curve, where the big house sits on the south bank. The pipe is just below that, so you may want to hold back 3 or 4 jugs to make sure you let them go so that they float right by that. I run from one side of the river to the other, setting out jugs; if necessary, I make several trips back and forth. If you float all the way down to Sweden Island, make sure you float several jugs right past the end of the first rock dike above the campground. I've caught a number of fish off the end of the dike, and several 20 pounders along the sandbar below the dike. Best bait is almost always fresh shad of skipjack. The dikes in the area where the Petit Jean enters the Arkansas is also a good spot. Another is a little ways below that where there is a huge sandbar in the middle of the river, which is probably well over 1/2 mile wide at that point. The Corps channel is on the north side, but there's a deep channel of some kind on the south side of the sandbar, and several rows of big wooden pilings. I've caught some big fish there. You'll find that many jugs will float rapidly down the river in the current, but some will get 'marooned' in backwaters, while others hang up on bottom. You will have to watch for these, pick them up, take them to the front of the pack, and drop them back in the water. This is NOT laid-back relaxing fishing! You are constantly running back and forth between the jugs scattered out over half a mile to a mile of river. When you pick up a jug that you plan to drop back in the water, just wrap the jugline around the big part of the jug and gently set it down in the bottom of the boat or on the seat. This will let you stack quite a few up with little danger of tangling.
    Remember:
    1. 20 jugs per person in the boat
    2. kids don't require licenses, but are allowed their own 20 jugs and their own limit of fish
    3. Jugs must be identified; check the regs to see the allowed methods

    Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
     
  5. rushryder

    rushryder New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    Arkansas
    Thanks for all the good advise. I can tell I'm really gonna love this brotherhood. I'll probably wait until the weather warms up a bit for the kids, but I may try it out on my own first to see how things go. I look forward to talking to you guys more. Thanks