Is Your Child Diabetic?

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Cuz, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    I have copied and pasted this from my Airlines Pilots Forum as I felt that someone on here could really use this information. By nature of the number of regular users here on the BOC, the odds are that there are a couple dozen of you that HAVE A CHILD WITH DIABETES GOING UNNOTICED RIGHT NOW.

    Hello all. Sorry to change the soup de jour but wanted to spread the news about this disease thats striking children at an alarming rate. Some reports are indicating one out of every 200 children is in danger of becoming diabetic.

    Had one of my first officers not shared his story of his diabetic daughter with me, I might not have known that MY daughter was diabetic. Because of him, my daughter was spared being in an intensive care unit for however long with Diabetic Ketoacidosis. She gets four shots of insulin a day now, but it sure is better than the story below.

    In the last year alone, there have been TWO more JetBlue Pilots that heard my story and rushed to have their children checked. IN both cases, they came back with Type 1 Diabetes. Best to find out before things get complicated and you find your child in the floor unconscious. Its a very insidious disease, and can dupe even the best of parents.

    Warning Signs
    1. Excessive Thirst
    2. Excessive Urination
    3. Not sleeping well
    4. Tummy aches
    5. flu symptoms.
    6. Weight Loss
    7. Sluggish and Tired.

    Please guys/gals, if you notice these types of things with your children, GO GET THEM CHECKED. Its a very simple blood test. (its a finger prick) if the blood sugars come back abnormally high, they will do another blood test which is called an A1C check. This will let you know if they are diabetic.



    Losing a Child to Sudden Onset Juvenile Diabetes

    By Deborah St.John

    On February 1st, 2009, we lost our daughter to a horrible, insidious illness…sudden onset juvenile diabetes (SOJD), also known as Type 1 Diabetes. The sole purpose for writing this article is to hopefully spare other parents from the needless trauma that our family has suffered from the sheer lack of education about this devastating and increasingly prevalent disease.

    For 6 years our daughter had been the picture of health. She had the normal childhood illnesses…ear infections, sinus infections, stomach viruses and such…nothing out of the ordinary. I was an experienced and, I thought, educated, parent of 4 children. So when our daughter, the next to the youngest, started exhibiting symptoms that very closely mimicked stomach flu- an illness that our 8 year old child had a couple of months earlier- it was no wonder that I didn’t consider that this illness was anything else. Unfortunately, it was…something very sinister and deadly.

    The last week of January, our daughter, Mary Kathryn, had started acting…the best description would be, droopy. She just didn’t seem herself, but aside from drinking more liquids, nothing seemed too out of the ordinary. After all, she was just in kindergarten…a lot of other kids that I know come home from school and seem tired. Preferring to lie on the couch instead of going outside to play…the too, it was January…who wants to go play outside in the cold anyway? So, I didn’t think too much about it.

    The next day the school nurse called to say that Mary Kathryn had come to her office because her tummy was hurting. The nurse checked her temperature, which was fine. I asked her if she thought I should come and get my daughter and she didn’t seem to think that was necessary. I told her about Mary Kathryn drinking more fluids and the nurse asked if we had had her blood glucose levels checked and I said no. I asked if higher fluid intake could relate to a viral type infection and the nurse said yes. I spoke to Mary Kathryn’s teacher and asked her to keep an extra close watch on Mary Kathryn and call me if she thought I needed to come and get her. The next contact that I received from her teacher was that Mary Kathryn seemed find and feeling better.

    On Wednesday of that week, Mary Kathryn got up feeling worse and complained about her tummy hurting. Fearing that she had contracted a stomach virus from school, I kept her home that day. For the most part, she would rest on the couch. She ate some Jello and fruit, apples and grapes, her favorites, and she was drinking a lot of liquids, but she wasn’t running a fever. So I kept waiting for the inevitable trips to the bathroom to help her and got the Lysol disinfectant ready.

    Thursday was a repeat of Wednesday. She never vomited, but she kept complaining that her tummy didn’t feel well. When I got up on Friday, I thought, surely she’s coming around the corner today with this sickness. When she wasn’t any better, I reminded myself that my 8 year old was sick on the couch for 5 days with the stomach flu before he finally got better, so I assumed she was going to be the same way.

    But on Saturday, she was so weak that I sat and held her most of the day. I gave her anything she asked for…Popsicles, coke, apples, Jello, water…all in hopes that it would help her to start feeling better. Amidst all this, there were almost constant trips to the bathroom. By late in the afternoon, I had gotten scared that something else was going on. She was so incredibly weak that I knew that I had to get her to the hospital.

    I arrived at our local hospital emergency room around 6:30 p.m. We didn’t have to wait long to be seen by the triage nurses. They asked what was going on with Mary Kathryn and I told them that she was complaining about her tummy bothering her, and she was weak and her breathing was labored. I also told them that she had started drinking more fluids and going to the bathroom a lot. They exchanged knowing looks and ordered a blood glucose test. When the results came back, they showed that Mary Kathryn had SOJD, Type 1 Diabetes.

    I was shocked…we didn’t have a family history of diabetes. The doctor told me that didn’t matter. Family history of diabetes increases the risk of other family members getting diabetes, but it doesn’t guarantee that you’re home free and can’t get diabetes if there is no history.

    Because of the immediate medical needs of my daughter, she was transferred to a hospital in a neighboring city that had a Pediatric ICU. We arrived at that hospital by 10:30 p.m. I had to wait for an hour while the nurses and doctor got her situated in her room. By the time the doctor was ready to speak to me, my husband had also arrived at the hospital.

    The doctor explained that what was going on with Mary Kathryn at the moment was called Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Because her pancreas had shut down, her body had no way of making insulin, which the body need in order to metabolize sugar in the body so that it can be used to fuel the cells. The only way to flush out the excess glucose is for fluids to bind with the glucose so that is can be flushed from the body. That is why Mary Kathryn’s thirst had increased and also why she needed to use the bathroom more.

    Another side effect of DKA is that the patient can’t drink enough water that the body needs to help flush the glucose out of their system. So the body starts robbing fluids from fat tissues, muscle tissues and even the organs of the body. As it turned out, Mary Kathryn was extremely dehydrated because of her condition.

    I stayed by her bed in the ICU as every intervention, on Mary Kathryn’s behalf was made by the doctors and nurses. I would hold her hand and talk to her. Every time her big brown eyes would open, I would stand up next to her bed and tell her that I loved her. She’d ask, “When can I go home, mommy?” and I’d say “soon”. The last time she opened her eyes, I stood up next to her and whispered in her ear, “Mary Kathryn, I love you” and she said, “I love you too, mommy.” Those were the last words she ever spoke.

    She would later become unresponsive and went into a coma. We found out that because she was so dehydrated and during the process of hydrating her, plus trying to stabilize her blood glucose levels, her brain swelled and herniated, causing brain death.

    From the time I found out that my daughter was a diabetic, until the time she died, was less than 18 hours.

    The medical community readily admits that first-time presentations of patients suffering from sudden onset juvenile diabetes (SOJD) is commonly in a hospital ER setting, to be followed up by a stay in ICU. Most patients live, but there are others, like my daughter that do not.

    You might ask, “Do you blame yourself?” My honest answer would be “yes”. I’ve tried to blame myself every way imaginable. After all, I’m a pretty educated parent, right? But, here’s the sad truth: I can’t even take the morbid pleasure of kicking myself and telling myself I’m an idiot, because some doctors have missed it in their own patients. Some of them have missed it in their own children.

    Well, okay…I concede that I’m not as smart as a medical doctor, but I should have gotten her to the hospital earlier. I am at fault there, right? You might think so, until I found out that patients have shown up at hospitals in worse shape than my daughter, and with higher blood glucose levels than she did, and they lived.
     
  2. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    yea its strange that with all crap they put in our food theise days that we cant pernounce that more people are getting sick these days and the drug companies are making serious bank off of it :angry: makes me sick to think this way but why else do they need to put monodextrohoginized something in our food cause they know well eat it anyway, and what will happen to all the people whos jobs depend on sick people if no ones sick :confused2: makes me wonder???? at least thats my way of dealing with having it. im shure its cureable but who would make money on that RIGHT???
     

  3. CuzICan

    CuzICan New Member

    Messages:
    1,751
    State:
    Fayetteville, A
    Thanks for bringing this valuable information to the forefront....One of my teacher friends at school has an adolescent daughter ( about 8/9) that was just diagnosed last year, and 2 of the kids in the high school have diagnosed in the past 2 years.

    I appreciate so much you bringing this to our attention.
     
  4. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    I had a cousin die with this. She was 14 years old. But she had been on shots for years. But being a kid with it. She did not last that long. It makes me cry to think of all the kids and even adults that go through this each day.
    Guess I need to get mine checked agian. That is about all I do is drink and go to the bathroom.:embarassed::embarassed:
    Pete
     
  5. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    You made my heart sink with the story of your cousin Pete. I'm sure she is riding on the wings of angels.

    If this thread does nothing more than put a little memory mark on someone's mind for down the road, a child just might be diagnosed before an unlucky parent finds there precious child unconscious.

    The symptoms are extremely subtle, and have even duped doctors from time to time. Bottom line, if your child has excessive thirst/urination, tummy problems, and anything from the list above, please go have them checked.
     
  6. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Cus I think this post may just well allow someone to catch this in there child soon enough to save them. If so its the best post you or anyone else has made.
    Thanks again for posting it.
    Pete
     
  7. Mi11er

    Mi11er New Member

    Messages:
    5,117
    State:
    Independence, M
    Thanks for the post. Terrible disease
     
  8. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    thats sad to hear, what happened? and what do you mean by being a kid she didnt last that long? :confused2: its not what they call a terminal disease when maintained. they told me that people with type 1 can live a normal life span. its not fun ill tell you that but i aint givin up:tounge_out:
     
  9. BIGCATFISH64

    BIGCATFISH64 New Member

    Messages:
    525
    State:
    Muncie,Indiana
    Yes, it can be a terrible disease, but can be managed, get your kids checked yearly, I am also a diabetic, and have complications from the disease, such as neuropathy, no it is not life threatening if managed properly, you can live a fullfilling life but let me tell you it's a constant job keeping on top of it.
     
  10. drpepper

    drpepper New Member

    Messages:
    6,133
    State:
    Indiana
    Thank you cuz... my 11 y/o son has everyone of those symptoms.
    I'll make an appointment Monday.
     
  11. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    I'm sorry to hear that Bill. I truly hope its not the case. If your child is really really weak, dont wait until Monday. Try to get him into a clinic or any type of facility that can do a quick blood sugar analysis. Its only a finger stick and the results are immediate. If his sugar levels are abnormally high, they will probably go ahead and admit him and begin insulin treatments.

    Like I said, I'm hoping your son just has the "bug" but if its indeed this sinister disease knocking on the door, the sooner you can get him checked the better off he will be. You dont want him to advance to the stage that you find him unconscious.

    Please call me if you have any questions. I will help out in any way possible.

    Cuz
    314-853-4000