Is this true?????

Discussion in 'Fishing Rod Review' started by LEROYDOZOIS, Jul 14, 2008.

  1. LEROYDOZOIS

    LEROYDOZOIS New Member

    Messages:
    1,542
    State:
    Arizona
    i was always taught to use a longer rod for more casting distance and more fighting power.......

    a guy that went shark fishing told me that you want a smaller rod becasue then the fish doesnt have as much leverage on you......

    he showed me the reels he had in a couple photos and the rods were 5ft long but looked like broom sticks......

    did he confuse himself???? or is he right?????

    he also surffished to thats why im confused.....
     
  2. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    yes! a longer rod will offer you more casting distance, but a shorter rod will give the fisherman more leverage on battling a fish. rod action plays a big part in leverage on the fish battle. hopefully some of the guys on here can explain it with more detail than myself.

    Mark..
     

  3. Coloman

    Coloman New Member

    Messages:
    441
    State:
    Soddy Daisy, Tn
    Most shark fishing is done from a boat, and a long rod is not needed. If you are bank fishing a longer rod will give more distance when casting.
     
  4. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    As long as the fish is on the long end of the lever (rod), and the fisherman is on the short end, the mechanical advantage belongs to the fish. The longer the rod, the greater the advantage.

    The fisherman has no leverage.
     
  5. LEROYDOZOIS

    LEROYDOZOIS New Member

    Messages:
    1,542
    State:
    Arizona
    im looking at a sturdy stick right now to make for my heavy tackle flathead setup its 6'6... im going to put a big saltwater reel on it and 30 lb mono.....
     
  6. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

    Messages:
    10,217
    State:
    Greenup Co. KY
    Try a Daiwa Beef Stick 7' Heavy Action. I have 2 with Abu 6500c3's on them and they'll bring anything in.
    I believe they are only around $20 each. You'll love them!!!:wink::cool2:
     
  7. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,789
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    long rods are called surf rods for a reason they came about cause the guys fishing in the surf needed to cast a lot rurther than a short rod could plus they hold your line up out of the water to keep the tides from washing your line back to shore.
     
  8. willcat

    willcat New Member

    Messages:
    2,463
    State:
    texas
    i have seen alot of shark fishermen use these sturdy short rods cuz they usually use some kind of yak or inflatable boat to get the bait way out there so they dont have to cast!!!! & the big reels for alot of line capacity to fight the fish in...
     
  9. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    SOME POINTS

    1st;
    Right, what the rod does is give the fishermen, range of motion and the ability to store energy in the 'spring' of a rod.

    When a powerful fish, takes a powerful run or surge, he creates a deep curve in the rod; this is stored energy that he will have to battle AFTER he has spent his run- drawing line through the drag.

    The amount of energy stored is the result of the stiffness moreso than length. Thus a stiff rod will load MORE energy into the rod allowing you more control over a large fish.

    IT would be absolutely wrong to say that this stiff rod MUST be small.
    Also keep in mind stiff rods take more force to load. Since loading is often the 'force' that lets you set deep hooksets. A stiff rod will be a problem if you get a light biting fish; be it catfish or walleye.

    STIFF and small stores more energy than limber and long. I believe (correct me IF I'm wrong) that stiffness is called action. Slow actions are stiff and store alot of energy; but took more energy to load. Fast actions bend more easily. Keep in mind too that STIFF rods send MORE energy to the fishermen; so while TOTAL energy that can be stored is higher- the fishermen will feel more force and with smaller fish, may get very little loading.

    2nd;

    The amount of stored energy is not the only reason for the rod. Rods also create range of motion. Try this -take a fishing reel and hold it in your hand. tie the line about a peice of wood. NOW try to move the wood Left (or right), try Lifting the wood. All this is very difficult. you have only one easy motion- to drag it strait in. With a long rod it is so much easier; and the longer the rod- the further to the side you can direct the force.

    Now think-- you've got a big ole catfish on the rod and he makes a beeline towards a tree. You don't have the strength the stop the surge; BUT you can put an appreciable force against his chosen direction. It 'hurts' to go that way. the force is less if he moves to the left and he insteads darts toward deep water at the left. The longer the rod; the further to the side you can put that pressure. You don't STOP the surge but do Daunt him from running into a snag.

    Lastly, I am going to say one last thing about the leverage argument. Levers were never a very analogy to a fishing pole. Levers sit on a fulcrom. (spelling?) a middle point. the placement of this folcrum decides the mechanical advantage-one way or another. Since a man does not rest his rod (normally) on a middle point- fighting it like a see-saw. there really is no MECHANICAL advanage one way or another IMHO. what most people confuse with leverage is in fact, a spring action. The energy spent 'deforming' the fishing pole is NOT felt by the fishermen. Thus a very big fish can pour a HUGE amount of energy in a long, slow action pole.

    ok. blabby enough. I really like BIG poles. I like their long casts (important when bank fishing), I like the better range of motion; and espacially an up-motion will keep a lot of fish from burying the bait into the river bottom. If you fish with a very stiff rod (you might store maximum power with a real BRUTE) but you do so at the expense of the littlier fish- where there in no stored energy at all. Also KEEP in mind SOME cheap rods- just plain DON'T store energy well. they are stiff TOO! they don't store much energy from a fish- big or little. if they aren't strong (which they normally aren't)- more often that not; they will just BREAK:angry:
     
  10. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    -------------------------------------

    A little net searching; not quite true. action refers to the speed at which the spring loads up and generally WHERE on the pole that the energy is loaded. Fast actions are stored near the tip.

    Power might better refer to how STIFF the pole is. This is the 'medium-heavy' or 'heavy' designation on the fishing pole. This is how much energy can be stored on the rod.


    Still thinking about actions (not too hard ,though) but I doubt you need a fast action. with live bait, the fish isn't going to just suck it in and spit it out like bass or walleye and it will take some really power to drive a heavy large hook through the live bait and into the brutes jaw.
    If I understand it right then, this is definitely a place for a slow action.
     
  11. john catfish young

    john catfish young New Member

    Messages:
    3,070
    State:
    Kentucky
    I recently used a 7' heavy action rod that was as big as the tip of your finger on the end of the rod and I landed a 43 lb Flathead. I wasn't to impressed with this rod. I now use 10 foot medium/heavy rods and recently landed a 67 lb Flathead and let me tell you .......I much prefer the longer rods for fishing from the bank. I will never use the short stiff rods again. As a matter of fact I am thinking about selling all my short rods and going with all long rods. The battle on the longer rods is much more fun. I didn't have any problem getting in the big one with 20 lb test line.:big_smile:
     
  12. wneubauer

    wneubauer New Member

    Messages:
    342
    State:
    McKinney, TX
    I think the shark fishing guys explain why you would want a shorter rod to fight big fish. They are after fish in the 150 lb + range and routinely catch them. If they had to cast the baits they use, they would need a small cannon to get the required distance off shore. They don't since they use kayaks to take their big baits off-shore. They can use any length rod they wish and they use the shorter, tough saltwater rods.

    Fishing on a off-shore boat for big marlin or tuna or whatever, 6-7 ft boat rods are typically used. While the leverage argument for the shorter rod still applies, casting a 12 ft surf rod off a boat would be a chore at best.

    On the bank, if I need distance, I use the 10-12 ft surf rod and a Squidder or Jigmaster for the best distance cast.... unless there is a big tree line right behind me, then I use what works, usually my 7 or 8 ft rods. The shorter the rod and the heavier the action, the more advantage you have over the big fish, or any fish really. A shorter rod is also easier to handle and transport.

    But let's not overthink this. Try out several lengths and types of rods, and use what you like best.:big_smile:

    Good luck!
     
  13. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    http://www.answers.com/topic/lever?cat=technology

    Jason, the fulcrum isn't always in the middle of a lever. This link prolly has more info than anyone wants, but if you scroll down to "Third Class Lever", you'll see a diagram that is analagous to a fishing rod.

    It's worth noting, that as a rod bends, it's length is effectively shortened, reducing (but not eliminating) the mechanical advantage enjoyed by the fish.
     
  14. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    All this info sounds good to me. Yes, the longer pole gets you more distance, but not more leverage. As far as shark fishing goes, what they said previously is correct. When bank fishing for sharks, they take the bait out with a portable boat, sometimes even motorized. There is no way to cast there far, even with a surf rod!
     
  15. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    By now, you've read the straight skinny: long rod, long casts; short rod, more power. Actually, it's not that the rod has more power, it's that you have better leverage and can deliver more power to your line. Here's a little test you can do to illustrate this. Get a long pole of some kind; any kind will do, even a length of pvc. Also get a short pole, preferably no more than a couple of feet long. Tie some cord onto a 1# weight and attach the cord to the end of the long pole; lift the 1# weight with the long pole. Now attach the cord to the end of the short pole and lift the weight. You'll notice that it's much easier with the short pole.
    But for most catfishing, you won't need to worry about having to use an extra short pole. But they are handy in situations where you can't afford to let the fish run even a few feet, or it will get tangled up; such as logjams or other such heavy cover. Years ago, I also heard about some guys below Kentucky Dam using 12" sections of broomsticks with reels clamped on for fishing the fast water below the dam. Personally, I'm not going to anchor in extremely fast water; any fast water I do anchor in will allow me to rig a 'lunch hook' on my anchor so I can chase a big fish in the current, then come back and reconnect to my anchor line. I don't need an extra short rod for that.