Is there a single memory from your childhood......

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by KansasKatter, Dec 7, 2006.

  1. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    I was wondering if we all have a single memory from your childhood either from one of your parents, or family member, or friend of the family that made a significant difference in you, and the kind of person you are?

    For me, it happened when I was 9 years old. Growing up we were not poor, but not wealthy by ANY means. But my brother and I always had everything we needed, and some things we just plain wanted, never went without. Not to brag, but since I was very young, I was always a star athlete, especially in baseball, mostly because of the way my Dad pushed me. He was our little league coach from when I was 6 through 13 years old.

    This particular season was a little different. We had a kid in our class named Curtis. Curtis was a great kid, everyone like him, but he was much smaller than the rest of us, and got picked on a little bit by the typical bullies. Curtis's family was POOR, and I do mean POOR, in a monetary way anyhow. He was being raised by his Aunt and two sisters, as his mother was the town loon, another reason to be picked on. Their house had bare wood floors, (not hard wood floors, just the 1x wood planks over the crawlspace) you could see through the cracks between the floorboards. The house was heated by a wood furnace and that is it. Needless to say, Curtis did not get to play ball, due to the expense of equipment, and transportation into town for practices and games. One night I was having a sleepover with a bunch of "the guys" including Curtis. We were playing ball in the yard, and Curtis was pretty good, for a kid that had never played organized anyway. My Dad was watching us out the window, and when we went in for dinner, asked Curtis why he did not play ball. Curtis said it was becuase he did not want to, but it was obviouse, even to a 9 year old, why he did not go out. My Dad talked him into going out, and he agreed.

    This is the thing that I remember most, and I think had the greatest impact on me and the type of person I have become. Keep in mind, my Dad and I were not very close at all, for a number of reasons. The first day of practice Curtis showed up, right on time. Only problem was with his glove. His family did not have the money to buy a "real" glove, so he had a toy glove, made of plastic, the kind you get for small children in a wiffle ball set. Of course being 9 and 10 year old boys, there were the typical laughes and jokes, and Curtis talked of not coming back to the next practice, but Dad kept on him, and he did come back. Little did I know, at the next practice, Dad took Curtis out to the truck before we started. There he traded Curtis gloves, his plastic one, for a brand new, TOP OF THE LINE leather glove, the nicest one on the team....including MINE!!:tounge_out: Curtis's face lit up like a Christmas tree, and he played the rest of the year. That was the only year Curtis played baseball, he did not become the next Willie Mays, or anything like that. But for one summer, he had the chance to be a BOY, and play a game, instead of working the entire summer cutting and stacking wood with his sisters, and gathering eggs, and doing nothing but chores from daylight to dark.

    I saw Curtis for the first time since HS last summer at our 20 year reunion. He went to college on a musical scholership for playing the trumpet, and is now a Sherrif's Deputy. He told me he still has that glove though!:big_smile:

    To this day, every year at Christmas time, I go out and buy a glove, and give it to the Toys for Tots, an organization here in Wichita that collects toys for unfortunate children across Kansas. I have done it since I was in college, when I did not have a pot to piss in, or a window to throw it out of. Nobody in my family even knows I do it, or why. It is just a story to share at Christmas time, hopefully to inspire all of us to give a little extra, especially to the kids. :smile2:
     
  2. richard dunbar

    richard dunbar New Member

    Messages:
    550
    State:
    Washington
    I was thirteen and headed down the wrong path. My nieghbor who I respected very much told me she was very dissapointed in me and if I kept going in the direction I was headed I would never amount to anything. That hurt my feelings real bad and even though I did'nt turn around right away, those words stuck with me my whole life and still do. Now I'm married with 4 kids, a great wife, and have only 5 yrs left before I retire from the Army. I may not have become much, but at least I'm somthing and I'm thankful that she said what she said.
     

  3. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    great example Rich, that is what I am talking about.

    Surely more of you have a similar childhood memory that has had a great deal of effect on your life.
     
  4. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    My dad had his own business; from about the age of 12, I worked in the repair shop on Saturdays and summers. The men who worked for Dad were my friends, and taught me much of what I know about being a man. The one thing that stuck in my mind was how hard they worked, how little they made, and how hard their lives were, compared to mine.

    I've never forgotten that lesson...it made me, more than anything else, who and what I am today.

    Geez, I hope that comes out right...
     
  5. zappaf19

    zappaf19 New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Monticello,IN
    I was dropped off at my foster parents (now my parents) house when I was 2 and a 1/2. All my worldly goods in a carboad box that seemed so big. The lady who dropped me off did not wait to see if anyone answered the door she just drove off. I knocked on the front door several times and it never opened. So I followed the walk around to the back pulling the box behind me and knocked. No answer.
    I started crying and went back to the front door and knocked and knocked and Finaly mom open the door and said you must be Bill.
    I have no clue why I remember that that but I do. This has brought tears to my eyes as I typed it. Tears of happiness.
    Bill