Im new to walleye fishing and need all the help i can get!

Discussion in 'Walleye Fishing' started by whiskerchaser, Jul 21, 2006.

  1. whiskerchaser

    whiskerchaser New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    New Mexico
    Ok so I have a 6'6" spinning outfit with 10lb test but I also use jig heads with a little plastic shad. I know i need to reel it in really slow and bounce it but how deep? I will be fishing clayton lake it has awesome walleye fishing one of the best in new mexico and the state record is from there 16lbs. I wanna catch some and need all the tips i can get.
     
  2. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    I have never done it but what I have seen done is bouncing the jig with a minnow on it in the same areas that small mouth would like, i.e. humps flats, points and so on. As for depth that I imagine would change with the temp. This is all I know and I know it wasn't much help sorry.
     

  3. whiskerchaser

    whiskerchaser New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    New Mexico
    Thanks anyway thats ok I cant get a hold of any minnows not real ones anyway they dont carry them in any baitshops :roll_eyes: also theres no smallmouth but I think smally's would be in the same area as largemouths. still open to advice guys thanks.
     
  4. jerseycat9

    jerseycat9 New Member

    Messages:
    2,544
    State:
    Oakwood Georgia
    hey whisker I do some walleye fishing from time to time. I know your bank bound so I will help as much as possible at night fish with crawlers and a spinning rig dont bunch the crawler up though they tend to go more for the natural look, Or rapalas, regular rubber grubs are deadly at times too. Walleyes are probably out of your reach during the day so fish the night time dont worry walleyes are built for hunting in the darkness. Try to fish flats near rip rap banks. Or find out wich shore has been wind swept all day and focus there too.they will prowl the shallows at night. Ive caught them in 2ft of water at times.The best time of year is the colder months so ask ask around at bait shops and find out wether there deep rite now the temps in your area may have them relatively inactive for most of the day.
     
  5. Tip123Q

    Tip123Q New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Indiana
    I always have all my luck at night using either crawlers or berkley grubs
     
  6. SkiMax

    SkiMax New Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    State:
    Rising Sun, IN
    Listen to Jersey cat! He
     
  7. HRCats

    HRCats New Member

    Messages:
    1,081
    State:
    Ohio
    Not sure on the proper way to catch em..but i do know the big cats love em!!
     
  8. SkiMax

    SkiMax New Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    State:
    Rising Sun, IN
    Listen to Jersey cat! He is right on with his advice. I would focus on rip/rap, shallow flats (especially if there is some sort of light vegetation on it), points, wind swept areas, and any humps you can find close to bank.

    To fish the flats I would try a jig or a worm harness with a spinner. I would tip these with a nightcrawler or leech and mark sure, as jersey cat said, that the worm/leech is in a straight line, not wadded up. I would drag these along bottom, or real close to it. with the worm harness try keeping it just a couple inches off bottom. With the jig try lifting it about a foot off bottom and letting it come bank down and hit the bottom. My favorite jigs are Berkley GULP! Power Grubs. I tend to like a chatruese or pink jighead and the same in my jig, but experiment!

    To fish the points I would use a crankbait. Fish this as deep as the rocks and crash your bait off the rocks and make a ton of commotion. To do this you will need a large billed crankbait. I am a huge fan of Rapala and use them almost exclusively. I would try the Shad Rap (my personal favorite for walleyes), the X-Rap (not as large of a bill so it has a greater chance to hang up but it has great action), and the DT series. Each DT will have a number with it like DT-8. This means Dives To 8 Feet. I try to 'match the hatch' with my colors but sometimes a color like hunter orange will elicit the most strikes so play around with this too.

    To fish the points you can try both of these methods and let the fish tell you what they want.

    A quick question, does this lake have a tailwaters area? If so this would be the spot to fish for walleyes this fall. I would fish there over any area on the main lake, but it will probably be crowded so night trips might be necessary here too.

    Hope all this helps!

    Good Luck, tight lines and keep us posted on how those walleye are doing!
     
  9. SkiMax

    SkiMax New Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    State:
    Rising Sun, IN
    Also, go to www.rapala.com and go to their lure section. It is an awesome website. You can click on each lure and it will show you all the color options, what fish to target with the lure, how and where to fish it, and even a video of the lure in action. It's an awesome tool that can save you money by not bying lures that will never make it outa the tackle box!
     
  10. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
    In my experience with bank fishing a longer rod is almost vital! It REALLY helps to put your bait out there where you need to be. I bought a 11'6" steelhead rod (L-power M- action) and use a spinning setup on it and I can chuck a crawler or crayfish yards farther than with a conventional set up. Hope this helps.
    P.S.
    For the Walleyes, I usually find it the best to fish at or near dusk- if your stuck on the bank like I am. HTH
     
  11. fitzytbone1

    fitzytbone1 New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    I have had luck in the NY Finger Lakes in about 4-5 feet of water. We use rapala lures because there are hundreds of mooneyes that come in at night to feed. One thing you might try is taking a 3" silver rapala and putting a split shot about two feet up from that and casting out. This will get the lure off the top and give it a little more action as you're reeling in. It will dive a little more so you can practically put it in front of them if you find a spot that they can hang out. Plus having that extra weight, even though it is just a split shot, you can get a little more distance on your cast. Otherwise I would stick with jigheads and nightcrawlers. Good luck to ya!!!