I need help finding shad

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by C2catfish, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. C2catfish

    C2catfish New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Hurst, Texas
    I'm pretty new to netting shad. I need some pointers on where to find em'. It's been pretty frustrating for us out there so far. In four trips to Lake Ray Roberts in N. Texas (a lake that claims to have a good population of gizzard and threadfin shad), we have only netted a few dozen on the first trip.

    I have learned to throw the net pretty good. We have seen no shad flippin' on the surface. Is that because it has finally cooled down here in N. Texas? The ones we see on my LCM-332c are just small balls.

    Am I missing something fundamental here? We went out into deeper water, but only saw smallish balls of shad there too. Where are they?

    I know that there is no better place to ask a question of this sort than this site, but is this the right folder to ask it in?

    I have of course, been beggin' for info in the Texas section.

    Any and all info well be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you brothers,

    C2
     
  2. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    What hours of the day are you trying? I find that early morning and late evening into the night are best for me. I also get into the back of coves and look around. If the water is cooler like it is now maybe try and find a spot where the water is warmer then the rest of the area. Shad is one thing I don't have trouble getting here.
     

  3. THE FISH WHISPER'ER

    THE FISH WHISPER'ER New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    waynesville ,IL
    up here in the fall they move into the shallow coves to suck up the warm sun
     
  4. RIVER-RAT

    RIVER-RAT New Member

    Messages:
    3,128
    State:
    MO / MT
    Shad eat plankton, the plankton gets carried when the wind blows or with the water current, usually to the shore or into the coves. Shad are also a schooling fish, if your catching some, then others are around, just keep throwing the net, if you catch a couple in an area, stay there and just place your net in different locations. Try near the shore then farther from the bank. Chances are, if your only catching 1 or 2 at a time, you're catching the stragglers. The rest of the school is there.

    However, now that the weather is getting colder, they may be heading for deeper warmer water and may be a little more difficult to locate. I think that's why alot of guys start freezing them this time of year, to stock up for winter.
     
  5. tank3544

    tank3544 New Member

    Messages:
    201
    State:
    Fredericksburg, VA
    what crazy said plus what river rat said

    find warmer water, usually in the backs of coves or at the mouth of creeks .. if you're not pulling any shallow the water has cooled enough for them to have moved deep

    generally speaking first thing in the morning is the best time to get them since they normally flip on the surface

    don't get discouraged but until it fully cools down they'll be tough to find .. most fish are on the move this time of year and won't be settled until the water somewhat stabilizes around its coolest temps for the start of winter

    last year bait was easy easy easy, then when it cooled off we went from 15 minutes getting bait to 3 hours .. running around trying to find them .. they where never in the same spot 2 days in a row .. then once winter set in to its average temperatures they were in predictable places and normally only took us half hour to an hour depending on if they were in the same places or not
     
  6. Mathersm

    Mathersm New Member

    Messages:
    230
    State:
    Darbydale, Ohio
    I do best in the morning as well. Most of my netting now comes of the spillways. I have a reservoir nearby that all you have to do is cast the net as close to the bank as possible.
     
  7. C2catfish

    C2catfish New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Hurst, Texas
    Thanks for the info guys. I'll try to put it to good use.

    I have been trying to net shad at dawn. Someone said I should try going out a couple of hours before daylight and put out my fishing lights. I could do this up in a cove. At this point, i'll try anything.........almost.

    C2
     
  8. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    I haven't been out for bait in a couple of weeks, but I last time I couldn't get them to flip on the surface at night even with a spotlight. Finally just started spotting the water directly in front of the boat. They still wouldn't start flipping like they did when it was warm, but I could see them moving just below the surface. Once I saw that, I started netting and did pretty good. You're probably already doing this, but I've noticed I do a heck of a lot better when I kind of cruise the cove with the trolling motor on real slow speed. I have the net loaded and one hand running the trolling motor. I can get closer and once I see them it only takes a minute to get the net in the water.
     
  9. kityhill

    kityhill New Member

    Messages:
    7
    We have just discovered what we think are shad off of our dock on a lake - can anyone tell me what they look like? we used a casting net and then tried to fish with them as bait but they were really small and died almost immediately when we touched them......I have heard of cutting them up as bait, but these looks like minnows on steriods any help way to small to cut up, any help appreciated suddenly the cats don't like our nightcrawlers any more :crying: thanks
    kit katt
     
  10. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    If you have spillways in your area they are great places to get shad..I get probably 80 percent of my shad from spillways..I never have had any luck finding shad after dark either..
     
  11. Rockin' Blues

    Rockin' Blues New Member

    Messages:
    310
    State:
    st.louis mo.
    if you have a good fish finder you can see schools on it