I have a slip bobber question

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by KansasKatter, Sep 7, 2006.

  1. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    Ok slip bobber experts, tell me what a bite is like using the slip bobber rig? I mean, do you go by the bobber going under, like a conventional bobber? Or do you still get the rod shake, as if you were fishing on the bottom? I am thinking generally of bank fishing, with very slow current, especially at night. Do I have to light my bobber, or can I watch the rod tip as usual?

    Thanks!
     
  2. dwreel

    dwreel New Member

    Messages:
    554
    State:
    Southern Pines, NC
    Depending on the bobber size or the fish, it could go under. Or it might just take off in whatever direction. If you can feel the fish has got your bait, set the hook.
     

  3. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    You can do all the above Jeff. Watch it go under,light it up at night and see your pole bend when a fish is on. Oh yeah you can use a line out alarm too. The slip float is mainly to suspend your bait. When a cat takes it you will know, what ever way you choose.:big_smile:
     
  4. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

    Messages:
    10,217
    State:
    Greenup Co. KY
    My bobber will usually disappear,even if its on bottom.I use a glow stick(2-3") that I tape on to my bobber so I can see it better.
     
  5. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    One more question, what size bobber are you using with live bait? Usually a 3-4" goldfish, or 4-6" perch.

    Seems like it would need to be fairly large to keep the bait from taking it all over the place, or pulling it under.
     
  6. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

    Messages:
    10,217
    State:
    Greenup Co. KY
    Mine are 9-10" cigar style bobbers.I usually use that size of bait also.If their good and lively they will move it around and take it partially under(depending on amount of weight) but they usually don't take it all the way.Trust me,you'll know when a fish is doing the pulling...I almost always use a slip bobber,I like to be able to change depths up to see where their at.Good Luck with them!!!
     
  7. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    Jeff, slide over to the right side of your screen , one of our sponsors Main Wolf Products Has the best Kat Bobbers that I have ever seen! You cant go wrong with one of them.
     
  8. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    I am no expert but for a big slip bobber I like to use a glow stick and see the bobber run are go under. You would be surprised at how well you can actually see a glowstick at night. You can use your clicker if you like are fish it like a regular bobber. And you can watch your rod tip. I use a bobber at times to suspend my bait are drift it right over the tops of stumps and rocks. See clear as mud. A bobber is very verstile and can be used as many ways as you can think of, so good luck. I hope I cleared that up for you by adding more dirt to the mud, lol
     
  9. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    The bobber goes under most of the time, or they might just run with the bobber. Its is fun fishing this way.
     
  10. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Sometimes, they play with the bait, they'll take it and make the bobber go down, then it will pop back up. It can happen several times before they take it and run or dive with it. If you use Kahles or J hooks, be patient and set the hook once it looks like they'be taken it under for good. With circles, let them set the hook. Once there is a good bend in the rod, you've got 'em. Just start reeling. But, if the bobber keeps moving around, sometimes going under, them moving around again, it may be time to start reeling in with cirlces or set the hook with Kahles and J's. Most likely, there's a fish on the hook, it may be small, but I have reeled in when that happens and there will be a 3 or 4 pound channel cat. The bite is probably the same as when bottom fishing, but I don't think you get the rod shaking you do on the bottom because the float absorbs the shock.