I Got My Garden Started Today

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by kyredneck, Nov 21, 2007.

  1. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    Planted winter onions, that is. Thanksgiving Day is the traditional time to plant them in this area. Barring a severe winter, I should be eating green onions by the end of February, first of March.

    Anyone out there grow them?
     
  2. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Our first snow is coming tomorrow an you're already into a spring garden. No wonder everybody past the age of 60 moves South. You probably got a suntan year around and don't even have to wear coveralls and two pairs of socks. Must be nice.
     

  3. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    Actually John where I live our winters (well, summers too) can go either way, depending on where the jet stream favors at the time. When it meandors to the north of us, our weather tends to come out of the gulf; to the south of us, we get canadian weather. My favorite jet stream position would be south of us May thru November, north of us December thru April. Dream on.

    Anyway, Iowa gardeners could grow winter onions; you'd just have to plant them a little earlier (Sept./Oct. probably), a little deeper, and mulch good.
     
  4. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    Nope here in PA, we got our first snow. Im waiting for a few days of warmer weather so I can turn my gardens over with the leaves mixed in.
     
  5. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    Well then, you're still 'gardenin' aren't you Scott?
     
  6. shuorc

    shuorc New Member

    Messages:
    116
    State:
    fl
    picked green beans yesterday, tomatoes and brocoli today, was worried about frost last week, onions are looking good(hope i got the sweet ones) some good things about Fla but no aspargus or rhubarb and no good apples.--shu
     
  7. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    thanks myron! have you been checked for skin cancer lately? lol.. my tomatoes were frosted out weeks back!! i know fla. has that growing weather!!! rollo
     
  8. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania

    What do you do to get your onions to turn into an onion?? For the life of me I cant get something larger then a "spring onion" which is like a fat scallion. I try yellow & red onions. Ive let em go to flower and I've also cut the flower head when it first shows up and I still cant get them to go to bulb. I have 2 in my garden that are now 2 yrs old that I started from seed from the time I let my 1st onion attempt go to flower by accident. Onions hate me. the look like onions when they're still planted but then turn into that "whatcha talkin about willis" guy when you pull them.
     
  9. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    Scott, in no way am I a pro on onions, I plant shallots and potato onions in the fall and will have a variety of sizes by July. Those 'fat spring scallions' are zactly what we love and eat a lot of.

    I do know that onions are heavy feeders and need lot's of water during the growing 'spurt'. I don't know how dry it was in PA this last summer, but it was very dry here and if ya didn't stay on top of watering, things suffered. My onions were smaller than normal, well, everything suffered this year not only because I'm too lazy to water, but I'm on cistern water here and any water for the garden comes from a shallow well (it went dry mid-July )out front and the rain troughs/barrels around the outbuildings.

    Another thing about onions is that you have to get the type suited for your area; something about the length of day during the growing season.
     
  10. shuorc

    shuorc New Member

    Messages:
    116
    State:
    fl
    had a terrible time with onions 'bulbing', planted 1st Oct and nothing but big plants the 1st of Apr, older gardener said that ground temp had to be 65 degrees and dirt had to be pulled back to the roots. Haven't figured out how the commercial guys put out the 'Fla' sweets in Jan, can't seem to but anything but 'Vidalia' type or Bonnie slips, i've planted both but no good sized ones until Apr.--shu
     
  11. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania

    you mean you have to unearth them down to the root crown?
     
  12. Swampy

    Swampy New Member

    Messages:
    818
    State:
    Fl.
    I don't grow a winter garden. Winter is my break time from working with plants and maint. gardens all year.





    Scott they like rich loose soil and lots of composted matter mixed into the soil,never let the soil get to dry. Treat them more like you would a flowering bulbs rather then veggies and you should get some nice fat boys before to long.
     
  13. Swampy

    Swampy New Member

    Messages:
    818
    State:
    Fl.
    Scott I forgot to tell you to be sure to not plant them to deep and much around them to help maint a more even soil temp around the bulbs.
     
  14. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    Long day onions (for the North) vs. short day onions (for the South).

    http://www.chestnut-sw.com/fastfact/oniontypes.htm " When you are shopping for onion varieties to plant in your vegetable garden, you will often see them listed as either short-day onions or long-day onions. Which ones to grow depend upon where you live.

    http://www.oniongardening.com/ "One important thing to remember about onions is that there are two different classes: long-day and short-day onions. Long-day onions are more appropriate for northern states because they are adapted to longer days. Southern states should use short-day varieties of onions."
     
  15. shuorc

    shuorc New Member

    Messages:
    116
    State:
    fl
    Enjoyed reading about short and long day onions and book marked the site to order the short day ones, never knew they were rated by day length. The choices i had were seeds or one type at the nursery and white sweet or red sweet from Wally World. thanks for the info--shu
     
  16. Swampy

    Swampy New Member

    Messages:
    818
    State:
    Fl.
    They say that because they need to breath/get fresh air around the neck of the bulb. If they are planted deep you will have to pull back the soil in most cases to get air to them. However by NOT planting them deep and using a thick mulch there is no need to pull back the soil.



    This it one of the tricks they use to do that. When they grade them for size the "sets" are staged in different sizes. They sell the large "mature" bulds for the table. Then they have 2-3 sizes of "sets" they will use the larger "sets" as their field "sets". Then they have smaller "sets" that are packed for sell to the home gardener.