I am me, thats all I can be

Discussion in 'LOCAL TENNESSEE TALK' started by SGTREDNECK, Aug 20, 2009.

  1. SGTREDNECK

    SGTREDNECK New Member

    Messages:
    1,522
    State:
    Tennessee
    Fishing started out for me when I was just old enough to walk. My grandparents owned a summer camp in Maine on patten pond. I would go there every summer with them, we would spend the whole summer there and only travel home so that I could dig worms and water the garden or harvest it. So I grew up on the water. My grandfather would take me fishing almost every morning, and evening. He was a very patient man, when teaching me about fishing. We would get up before the sunrise and cook breakfast and he would always let me help with that. And we would always sit there and listen to the radio waiting for the right time. The right time, was when the lake looked like a sheet of glass, no waves at all. I miss those silent mornings, where you could hear nothing but the songs of the loons calling back from one end of the lake to the other. I forgot to tell you my grandparents were raising me at the time. but we would go out and fish for hours at a time, most of the time until we hear the dinner bell. There was this old bell as you walked into the camp, that my grandadad said his dad put there so he could call him back to eat from fishing. As the years went on he taught me alot about fishing. And I would fishing all day long from the dock and walk the pond edge catching pickerel, yellow perch and sun fish. But I grew bored of this and wanted to go out on the pond. And my grandfather was getting older and he started to fish less and less. So when i was 7 or 8 he said take the canoe out. Just listen for the dinner bell. So I took the canoe out and headed straight across the pond. I caught lots of fish and had the time of my life. I only brought one fish home to show him and my grandma. It was a big pickerel. One of them cleaned it and we ate if for supper. Then about a year or so later, i was down at the other end of the pond when a storm came in. The waves were getting big and the wind was blowing hard the wrong way. So i struggled hard and was tring to make it back. I was gaining and them the wind would blow me back. I made it alittle further up the pond and i saw a boat heading my way. He threw me a rope and towed me home. Grandma was not happy, she was yelling at my grandpa saying how you going to let a little boy go out there all alone. He said hes not a little boy hes alttle man. So the man that came to pick me up said my grandson is going to be here tomorrow and he loves to fish. Do you want to come fishing with us. He and my grandpa had known each other for years. So i started to fish with them from time to time. Then Josh and I took out the canoe everyday of that summer. I made a lifelong friend that summer. Then when i was about 10 my grandfather took me out in his v-bottom aluminum boat and taught me how to drive it. We got back from fishing that after noon and I asked if he could teach me to drive it again and he said no. I was kinda bummed, but before i got too distraught he said take her out yourself. Just be care and you know the rest. So from that moment on I fished by myself for most of my fishing trips. I would have other kids from the other camps come and fish with me. They thought I was so cool because I could drive a boat. Now as I think about it fishing has always been a place for me to escape the world and just sit and ponder. A place where I feel free. I dearly miss fishing with my granddad as a child. And I sometimes talk to him while I am fishing or hunting. Even tho he doesn’t respond I already know what he would say. I learned many a lesson while fishing with him. And fishing to me is way to reconnect with him and the others loved ones that I have lost. There is something spiritual about fishing and hunting to me. He taught me to respect nature, and only kill what I am going to eat. Growing up the only catfish I ever caught were horn pout (bullheads). Then when I was 15 I went fishing in the patomic river in MD. I caught two catfish, but there were both huge. Easily over 25 pounds each. And I drug them back to the house and they called em small. And we ate them. Now I live in TN and I love to catch catfish. I will eat them, but I really just like to catch them. And I will run a trot line or two a year. And I will run 10 -15 jugs maybe 10 times a year. And 99% of the fish get let go, because I am not going to eat them. So for someone to say I am not a fisherman because I jug fish or ran a trot line. To me that are taking all the above mentioned away for me and telling me where to stick it. So to the people out there that think I am a bad person because I run jugs or a trot line. It doesn’t matter what you think of me. I have basically given up my life to protect your way of life. And if my way of legal life doesn’t suit you, so be it. I am who I am. And I accept everyone until they give me a valid reason not to. Not just a fishing method. Good luck out there on the water and I hope all of your families are safe and happy. Goodnight
     
  2. Catfish_Scooter

    Catfish_Scooter New Member

    Messages:
    2,055
    State:
    Tennessee
    What a nice heartfelt story Sarge. God Bless you & the soldiers at war.. :wink: That deserves REPS.
     

  3. CatHunterSteve

    CatHunterSteve New Member

    Messages:
    456
    State:
    Snowville, Va
    Thanks for the post Andrew i enjoyed the story and all I got to say is fishon my friend, i would run a line or set jugs with you anytime and we could sit and talk about those who have gone before us, I totally understand that way of thinking! As I said in my PM it is truly an honor to be your friend! Be safe and thanks for being the person you are!
     
  4. catfishfearme

    catfishfearme New Member

    Messages:
    717
    State:
    govecity,ohio
    as u know, u should never try to change who u r,for someone eles,in doing so u lose who u r, thanks for the story :wink:
     
  5. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

    Messages:
    13,546
    Andrew, that was a wonderful story, thank you. But it's just not true, not everyone thinks trot lines and/or jugs are bad. I DO realize that on occasion it may come across that way on the BOC. There HAVE been a few threads pertaining to certain states, which promoted outlawing those means of catching catfish (and in those states it may be necessary, I don't know, I don't live there or experience it, so I don't have a say.) In NC, we have rivers which are overrun by flatheads, and in those cases quite a few legal means of "catching" fish are authorized by the state.

    I live in the western area of NC, and over here we are old school. If you catch it, you eat it, or you return it to the waters it came from.

    I HAVE been influenced by the BOC, and have signed the petitions to protect catfish, in multiple states. I know TOO many folks here who have something to say regarding that not to take heed. I realize I don't know everything. :wink:
     
  6. SGTREDNECK

    SGTREDNECK New Member

    Messages:
    1,522
    State:
    Tennessee
    If I came across as everyone hate trotlines and jugs I am sorry. I didn't mean it that way.
     
  7. lforet2002

    lforet2002 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,534
    State:
    Tennessee
    Great story Andrew..I love nostalgic stories like that..I saw visions of my past with my grandfather and my dad as I read your story..Maybe some time I could share my story too..Thanks a lot for sharing with us..
     
  8. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    Yes, that's a great story, Sgt. Andrew. My grandfather's place was on a creek and we used to fish for bluegills and bullheads. Later we fished a quarry coal mine pond and ran trot lines and fished for channels and crappie using an old wooden rowboat. I'm older than you, but know where you're coming from.:wink: