I am a little confused about catfish rods?

Discussion in 'Fishing Rod Review' started by Grits, Sep 26, 2007.

  1. Grits

    Grits New Member

    Messages:
    119
    State:
    Arknasas
    Hello Everyone

    I recently bought two Berkley 8' 2 piece catfish bait casting rods. They have a medium heavy action and I believe they are E Glass.

    I also have a couple of All Star 7' medium heavy action graphite casting rods.

    In comparing the two rods, what are the advantages of the Berkley over the All Star? Why are graphite rods not used more for catfishing?

    Thanks,

    Grits
     
  2. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Forgetting all the different hardware.Glass is heavy but tough and strong if made right.Sort of like Oak or Hickory is to wood.I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     

  3. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,711
    State:
    Independen
    There's nothing wrong with a graphite catfish rod, although under extreme conditions, they may not be as durable as e-glass. For heavy current the e-glass rods will probably work better, but in a slow or no current situation the graphite rods will work great. And I have a couple or six of the All Stars myself.
     
  4. Coyote1

    Coyote1 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Missouri
    Brother Roger;
    If I understand things correctly, and sometimes I don't but I'll give it a shot here for ya. :)
    Graphite rods have traditionally been real lightweight rods better suited for smaller species than the 60#+ Lunker Blues that many of us go after.
    Right now, the best bang for the buck, especially if you have not ever used a graphite rod is the Shakespeare Big Water line of rods that are a combination of a glass {T-Glas comes to mind this moment} and graphite.
    The reason all the big name bass, crappie, walleye, folks use them is because of the sensitivity you get with a lightweight all graphite rod. BUT, they cannot take on the above mentioned blue without a great risk of breaking! And don't ever get the tip of one caught in the car door!
    You CAN get an all graphite rod for Large Blue Catfish, but it's going to cost you a BUNCH OF $$$$$$$$ and you probably will not like using it either.
    Since the BOC has been around and getting bigger each day, the rod manufactures are starting to realize that Catfishing IS a True Sport and are designing Rod strictly for Catfishing and not just for the Big Blues either!
    Picking a rod for Catfishing is a very personal matter! If you go to a BOC gathering ask the other Brothers and Sisters if they would let you look at their equipment and ask them WHY they use that particular set-up? I know for sure, they will be GLAD to help you any way they can. But the truth is, A Catfishing Rod, and tackle too, is a matter of what kind of fishing your going to do, {as in from a bank or a boat are just two examples among dozens of others}, where your going to fish at and under what conditions, and what your personally comfortable with using.
    Everyone, Sisters and Brothers, have their reasons for using the equipment they have. What they have might, nor might not, be for you! Or maybe the reel they use is right but you need a different kind of rod response. It's as simple or complicated as you want to make it.
    I usually tell beginners to try at least one Shakespeare Rod because you can get a good one, sometimes two, for under $100 dollars in most cases. The experience you get with that rod might show you that the rod you have is all you need, or it might show you that you need to keep looking. There are many members that use only the Shakespeare rods.
    I can tell you that there is ongoing research, Cabela's is one company as is Loomis, that are getting serious in rods for us "professional":wink: BOC type Catfisherpersons! They will be a bit expensive at first just like everything new is, and as research progresses things will get cheaper and all.
    There is NOTHING wrong with you using the rods you have. Learn everything you can from them and if you find you need more then the rods have taught you that if nothing else!
    I'm apologize for getting so long winded! I hope some of this helps! If I can ever be of assistance to you please do not hesitate to contact me, our just about any of the other Brothers and Sisters because that is what the BOC is all about!
    Just because you are a newcomer does not mean you don't have anything to share either! Don't ever think that! In fact, often, the reverse is true! :big_smile:
    WELCOME ABOARD! We are GLAD to have YOU with us! :big_smile:
    Fraternally,
    One long winded,
    Coyote1
    [[[[[End of a long winded post!:confused2::wink:]]]]]
     
  5. Bacardipr05

    Bacardipr05 New Member

    Messages:
    1,424
    State:
    Pennsylvan
    Well said Brother Coyote everyone has or her own preference. Traditionally E-Glass/Fiberglass rods are more durable. Graphite on the other hand is more sensitive and more stiff/stout. I myself prefer to use a Bass Style rod that is Graphite Composition(glass and graphite but mostly graphite) for catfish. My old fishing buddy always called it "teenie weenie" he is the type that loves to carry 9ft MH or heavy rods. But for channel catting I love this rod because I can feel them pecking more so than he can with his big rods. Then there is the whole weight thing Graphite lighter Eglass heavier. In order to get some stifness(stout) to an all glass rod it is usually heavy and not very sensitive. On the other hand if you are targeting big blues and Flatheads it probably doesnt matter much. Well Grits a whole book can probably be writting on the pro's and con's. Sometimes its a trial and error thing good luck.
     
  6. Grits

    Grits New Member

    Messages:
    119
    State:
    Arknasas
    Thank you all for the replies. I have two Shakespeare Ugly Stick M-H eitght foot rods that I am trying. As I mentioned above, I am also using my all Star M-H seven footers.

    When I started catching catfish on my farm, it was obvious my tackle was too light. Medium rods with ten to twelve pound test line. The spinning tackle I was using was lighter than that. It is a fifty acre irrigation reservoir that is full of stumps and dead timber. I am a also a gun dealer which gives me access to fishing tackle a wholesale prices. I bought two or four of the M-H All Stars and armed them with Ambassador Record 60 Series reels with twenty pound test line. I feel like I have some twenty pound plus channel catfish in there. I have caught many in the six to eight pound range. I also caught two just above and just under ten pounds ten minutes apart. I have also had my twenty pound mono snapped.

    I plan on fishing the Arkansas River for blues when I get my boat finished. I do feel it is easier to throw live bait with the longer whipper rod. For lack of terminology, the long rod seems to sling the bait with lower acceleration than the quicker graphite rod. I have noticed muskie rods that seem to be a horse. Has anyone used equipment similiar to that?

    As far as my Shakespeare's that I mentioned above, are they suitable for the larger blues?

    Tell me if I am on the right track.

    Thanks,

    Grits
     
  7. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Grits, the Ugly Sticks are composite rods, a combination of grahpite and glass. They are very tough. You MH Ugly's are decent catifishing rods, but won't throw the heavier weights if fishing current. They'll handle just about any catfish you are likely to catch, depending on your ability and the conditions in which you fish, but they won't work as well with heavier lines.

    Ugly Sticks you may want to look at as you improver your tackle are the Tigers and the Big Water rods. Both have the backbone and the ability to handle large fish in heavy structure, as wells take heavier lines and weights. If you need to save a bit, the Ugly Stick Catfish rods are very good too.
     
  8. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Back before there was such a thing as a catfish rod, I used 7.5' graphite flippin' sticks with 6500s. They will handle any channel cat that swims.
     
  9. DemolitionMan

    DemolitionMan New Member

    Messages:
    442
    State:
    Tupelo, Mississippi
    Well, let me throw my 2 cents in.....Graphite is very sensitive to breakage, IMO....I'm rough on my equipment and I always by E-Glass rods....If you're the type of fisherman that's easy on his equipment, go for the graphite if you want it....Graphite has been known to break because a fish "loaded" the rod down and a simple "scratch" was on the rod....That's the reason, I prefer Eglass rods....For reels smaller than the 7000's, I use only Ugly Stik Tiger Lite rods.....I have an 8' custom rod by Blackhorse w/another on the way.....Another rod I like is the "Jim Moyer" rod from catfish connection....Dwight
     
  10. BLKCLOUD

    BLKCLOUD Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Pulaski Tn
    I fished for years with cheaper rods..as my income grew so did my taste in rods.. I love my allstars. but..to be honest..I dont catch any more fish with a 150.00 rod than I do with a 15.00 rod..:wink:
     
  11. coolarrow2

    coolarrow2 New Member

    Messages:
    249
    State:
    Texas
    I agree with the fact that you do not have to spend alot for a catfish rod! I use South Bend catfish specials most but I have a ugly stick catfish rod and a couple of the Sil Star catfish rods too. I boat fish all the time so I buy 7' heavy action rods no matter what brand I get. All work well but I would have to say I like the ugly stick the least due to the soft tip action. I like the e- glass rods with back bone for getting the big fish out of the log jams. Except for the ugly stick all the other rods were under $20.00. I have 8 of the rods and have never broke one yet and I have landed tons of cats on them all. So for 20.00 buck anyone should be able to get a good tough rod for hauling out old Mr Wiskers!
     
  12. Grits

    Grits New Member

    Messages:
    119
    State:
    Arknasas
    Thanks fellows

    I am starting to get the picture. First, I do treat my equipment well so I am not too worried about breakage. It seems like I am well armed for the channel cats I am catching on my farm; however, I may be a little under gunned for river fishing.

    As far as the Tiger and Big Water rods, do ya'll recommend any specific models. Aslo, what size reel and line test would be recommended.

    Do ya'll remember how much fun it is when your learning curve was as steep as mine?

    Thanks again,

    Grits
     
  13. catman fl

    catman fl New Member

    Messages:
    60
    State:
    fl
    I like the ugly sticks. as far as the size of the rod the only ones that I use is the big water. I have landed fish up to almost 200 lbs on them using 80 & 100 lb power pro in salt water.they are 7ft 20 to 40 lb rods. also have landed flatheads to 35 lbs. for the money they are one of the best rods I have found.I have custom mad loomis & others.the only ones I take to tourments are the ugly sticks.
     
  14. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    ^^^ I agree.

    There are almost certainly better rods than Uglies out there, but for the money, they are simply unbeatable.
     
  15. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Ugly Stik Tiger M/H one piece rods are my favorites. Biggest fish I've taken on one is 70#, but they still have a limber enough tip you can see when you're getting a bite. I boat fish, so I use 7'. I like them for both the MO river and lakes. Good Luck!

    Branden
     
  16. DemolitionMan

    DemolitionMan New Member

    Messages:
    442
    State:
    Tupelo, Mississippi
    Well, like I said, I have anything under a 7000 Abu on a 7' Ugly Stick Tiger Lite and love em....My 7000iC3's are on Blackhorse Custom rods and the Jim Moyer 7'6" MH....Of course, I swap reels back and forth between the rods...I have even used the baitcasting reels on the Cabela's 11' spinning rod with the 2 1/2lb curve....So, rods is really just a personal choice with the more money you put out, the longer they will last with reasonable care.....Dwight
     
  17. RandyH

    RandyH New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    VA
    graphite i light weight more sensitive when detecting bites and alot more stiffness in the fabrics e-glass and fiberglass are 2 differant types of glass fiberglass rods are older trditional rods that stil do break under loads but not as much as graphite would now e glass is a form of fiberglass but its a fiberglass on steroids alot more flexable if needed alot heavy in weight and alot stronger now if you want to spend the money s-glass is the ticket gives you the weight of lighter fiberglass rods but alot stronger than eglass your other option is grphite composite this is a combo of graphite and fibercomposite glass gives you a softer tip than graphite and the light weight of graphite but this rod is well not the best of both worlds i dont like graphite lets the bass fishermen use them if you catching kitties under 10lbs shot use what ever you want it will work but if your looking for walter 60 70 80 and up use eglass or s glass if not its like taking a bb gun to an elephant hunt lol havefun
     
  18. bluejay

    bluejay Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,507
    State:
    Napoleon, Mo.
    Best explanation I've seen. Thanks!!
     
  19. Crucial

    Crucial New Member

    Messages:
    225
    State:
    Virginia Beach VA
    There is a lot of fact, a lot of truth, a lot of opinion and a lot of myth posted here so far... Good luck sorting out the lot:wink:

    Honestly, there is no reason graphite rods are not used more for cats other than a lot of catfishing tackle and mentality has been borrowed from the ocean fishing community. Composit rod's reign king in the salt, because they see a LOT of action(abuse!)... sometimes as much as 100 fish in a single trip when on a school of yellowtail or bluefin etc... also salt fish are veracious.. just when you think you've got the fish in the boat all h#ll breaks loos and your back to your rod with as little as 5'-8' of line between the tip and the fish in the water... so a rod that will littlerly bend in a U shape is almost a must. Casting out to the fish is not needed and not an issue because the captain can steer the boat to the fish.. so no need for a rod that will sling lead out there... so again the composit and glass rods are ideal..

    Now, how does that relate to catfishing? Well.. if your fishing from a boat in deep water.. it relates very well.. because that big ole' blue could feasibly take a dive straight down into deep water just before you got the bloody cat in the boat... here a glass/ composit rod would be ideal.. just as it would for the ocean.

    If you fish from the bank, the graphite rod's would give you the advantage of casting distance, sensitivity, responsiveness to both you and the fish.. and will be lighter and easier to hold on to (as opposed to sitting in the rod holder on the boat). But that doesn't mean a glass rod won't do the job.

    Fishing rods are tool's and just like you CAN use a pair of lineman's to drive a nail, a hammer will do it better.... so you have to analyze your fishing and stock your "tool box" according to the job your doing.
    I don't do a lot of boat fishing.. in fact I only boat on charters once or twice a year.. so all of my rods are graphite (except for my seeker jig stick for the charters).
    I like longer rods that have casting potential (9' is my shorty), rods with a parabolic to medium fast action so there is enough play in the belly to bend the rod very near in two... with out snapping it.. but enough spine to play even the largest of fish.. all of my catrods are made for the salt water market, but intended to be fished from shore.. i.e. surf rods...

    for what it's worth, there is no such thing as a "catfish" rod or a bass rod or trout rod or ...what ever... the fish doesn't know what kind of rod you have, nor does it care... :roll_eyes: Use what works for you.. what's comfortable in your hands.. what gets your bait to the fish.. everything else is just irrelevant.